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How Many Oxygen Masks?  
User currently offlineN1641 From United States of America, joined May 2000, 220 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4371 times:

I went on a flight the other day, bought 3 tickets and had an infant that me and my wife would trade from time to time. During the oxygen mask briefing I thought, is there a 4th one up there? or would we have to share?

4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineXnv From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 142 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4317 times:

Usually in a seat bank of 3 there are 4 oxygen masks so you have one for an infant. You cannot have more bodies than oxygen masks so if there were two people both traveling with infants plus another adult in the row they would have to move someone.

On tehe F28 (at least the ones I've flown on) there are 3 and 3 masks in a 2 and 3 across seating configuration, so infants have to sit on the left hand side otherwise they would not get an oxygen mask.


User currently offlineAirplanepics From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2003, 2732 posts, RR: 41
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 4215 times:

On a 737, there are 4 for every 3 seats.

Simon



Simon - London-Aviation.com
User currently offlineAvioniker From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1109 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 4183 times:

It's purely a function of the operator how many masks are in the PSU above each seat row.

Some airlines have 4 on the left and 3 on the right, some have 4 on both sides and some don't allow lap babies because they only have one mask per seat.

In all cases there must be a program or control in place to ensure that there are no more noses below the PSU than there are masks in it. That way the reservations agents and ticket counter personnel won't inadvertantly seat lap babies under a PSU that can't accomodate them.

The NG Boeings come from the factory with 4 in each PSU unless the operator specifies otherwise.

And just in case you need more trivia:

Title 14: Aeronautics and Space
PART 121—OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS
Subpart K—Instrument and Equipment Requirements

§ 121.333 Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins.
(a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a pressurized cabin, the certificate holder shall furnish oxygen and dispensing equipment to comply with paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section in the event of cabin pressurization failure.

(b) Crewmembers. When operating at flight altitudes above 10,000 feet, the certificate holder shall supply enough oxygen to comply with §121.329, but not less than a two-hour supply for each flight crewmember on flight deck duty. The required two hours supply is that quantity of oxygen necessary for a constant rate of descent from the airplane's maximum certificated operating altitude to 10,000 feet in ten minutes and followed by 110 minutes at 10,000 feet. The oxygen required in the event of cabin pressurization failure by §121.337 may be included in determining the supply required for flight crewmembers on flight deck duty.

(c) Use of oxygen masks by flight crewmembers. (1) When operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, each flight crewmember on flight deck duty must be provided with an oxygen mask so designed that it can be rapidly placed on his face from its ready position, properly secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen upon demand; and so designed that after being placed on the face it does not prevent immediate communication between the flight crewmember and other crewmembers over the airplane intercommunication system. When it is not being used at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the oxygen mask must be kept in condition for ready use and located so as to be within the immediate reach of the flight crewmember while at his duty station.

(2) When operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, one pilot at the controls of the airplane shall at all times wear and use an oxygen mask secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen, in accordance with the following:

(i) The one pilot need not wear and use an oxygen mask at or below the following flight levels if each flight crewmember on flight deck duty has a quick-donning type of oxygen mask that the certificate holder has shown can be placed on the face from its ready position, properly secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen upon demand, with one hand and within five seconds:

(A) For airplanes having a passenger seat configuration of more than 30 seats, excluding any required crewmember seat, or a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds, at or below flight level 410.

(B) For airplanes having a passenger seat configuration of less than 31 seats, excluding any required crewmember seat, and a payload capacity of 7,500 pounds or less, at or below flight level 350.

(ii) Whenever a quick-donning type of oxygen mask is to be used under this section, the certificate holder shall also show that the mask can be put on without disturbing eye glasses and without delaying the flight crewmember from proceeding with his assigned emergency duties. The oxygen mask after being put on must not prevent immediate communication between the flight crewmember and other crewmembers over the airplane intercommunication system.

(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(2) of this section, if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave his station at the controls of the airplane when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use his oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to his duty station.

(4) Before the takeoff of a flight, each flight crewmember shall personally preflight his oxygen equipment to insure that the oxygen mask is functioning, fitted properly, and connected to appropriate supply terminals, and that the oxygen supply and pressure are adequate for use.

(d) Use of portable oxygen equipment by cabin attendants. Each attendant shall, during flight above flight level 250 flight altitude, carry portable oxygen equipment with at least a 15-minute supply of oxygen unless it is shown that enough portable oxygen units with masks or spare outlets and masks are distributed throughout the cabin to insure immediate availability of oxygen to each cabin attendant, regardless of his location at the time of cabin depressurization.

(e) Passenger cabin occupants. When the airplane is operating at flight altitudes above 10,000 feet, the following supply of oxygen must be provided for the use of passenger cabin occupants:

(1) When an airplane certificated to operate at flight altitudes up to and including flight level 250, can at any point along the route to be flown, descend safely to a flight altitude of 14,000 feet or less within four minutes, oxygen must be available at the rate prescribed by this part for a 30-minute period for at least 10 percent of the passenger cabin occupants.

(2) When an airplane is operated at flight altitudes up to and including flight level 250 and cannot descend safely to a flight altitude of 14,000 feet within four minutes, or when an airplane is operated at flight altitudes above flight level 250, oxygen must be available at the rate prescribed by this part for not less than 10 percent of the passenger cabin occupants for the entire flight after cabin depressurization, at cabin pressure altitudes above 10,000 feet up to and including 14,000 feet and, as applicable, to allow compliance with §121.329(c) (2) and (3), except that there must be not less than a 10-minute supply for the passenger cabin occupants.

(3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons might require undiluted oxygen following descent from cabin pressure altitudes above flight level 250, a supply of oxygen in accordance with the requirements of §25.1443(d) must be provided for two percent of the occupants for the entire flight after cabin depressurization at cabin pressure altitudes above 8,000 feet, but in no case to less than one person. An appropriate number of acceptable dispensing units, but in no case less than two, must be provided, with a means for the cabin attendants to use this supply.

(f) Passenger briefing. Before flight is conducted above flight level 250, a crewmember shall instruct the passengers on the necessity of using oxygen in the event of cabin depressurization and shall point out to them the location and demonstrate the use of the oxygen-dispensing equipment.

[Doc. No. 6258, 29 FR 19205, Dec. 31, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 121–11, 30 FR 12466, Sept. 30, 1965; Amdt. 121–132, 41 FR 55475, Dec. 20, 1976; Amdt. 121–262, 62 FR 13256, Mar. 19, 1997; 62 FR 15570, Apr. 1, 1997]




One may educate the ignorance from the unknowing but stupid is forever. Boswell; ca: 1533
User currently offlineWhiskeyflyer From Ireland, joined May 2002, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (10 years 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 4012 times:

with regards to XNV comment regarding the F28 oxygen masks (drop down) a lot of F28s do not have masks (eg SAS) as the aircraft could demonstrate its ability to decend very rapidly in the event of emergency, thanks to those speed brakes (also why F28 only large commercial aircraft going into Baghdad at the moment, speedbrake gets you down quick)

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