Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Do Airplanes Have Keys?  
User currently offlineIslipWN From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 12199 times:

THIS IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST STUPID QUESTIONS EVER ASKED IN THE HISTORY OF AIRLINERS.NET!
Do airplanes have keys that you need to start the engines or anything because I just don't get why they would make a plane where you and just push a button, or just turn a knob and the engines would turn on. I know that I'm probably going to get some mean response or something but that's OK because this is the most stupid question.

Joe Smile/happy/getting dizzy

64 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMD11LuxuryLinr From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1385 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 12147 times:

..Yeah. For the cockpit doors..  Big grin


Caution wake turbulence, you are following a heavy jet.
User currently offlineJeffDCA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 12134 times:

Light piston engine aircraft do have keys to start the engine, but turboprops and jet aircraft engine starts are completed by button pushing.

Cheers,

Jeff


User currently offlineUswyjer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 12125 times:

Actually, that's not stupid of a question at all. I took some flight lessons and the 172 I flew in had a key for the engine; I did training from the left seat so I was using the key Smile
-Jeremy


User currently offlineBurnsie28 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 7531 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 11891 times:

Your typical pax plane, 737, A320, 777 etc do not have keys, not even the DC-9's  Big grin


"Some People Just Know How To Fly"- Best slogan ever, RIP NW 1926-2009
User currently offlineA300 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 473 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 11881 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

All big jets have ceremonial keys that are handed over to the new owner when they cough up the mere USD 140,000,000 required (example is for 747).


Boland Aseman Jayegah Man Ast.
User currently offlineUAXDXer From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 765 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (9 years 11 months 2 weeks ago) and read 11848 times:

Yeah they have keys! On the 737NG, the ignition is right below the turn signal.


It takes a bug to hit a windsheild but it takes guts to stick
User currently offlineBill142 From Australia, joined Aug 2004, 8439 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 11772 times:

I think someone has been watching Seinfeld.

User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3608 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 11709 times:

I just don't get why they would make a plane where you and just push a button, or just turn a knob and the engines would turn on.

Because it's a lot more complicated than that. There's no single button than can turn on an engine in a cold cockpit. It takes a sequence of procedures that is way more complex than any pass code you could ever come up with.

Imagine that rather than having a key to turn on your car, you instead had a panel with buttons on it numbered 1-400. To start your car, you needed to punch in an exact sequence of digits 20 numerals long, and between punching in some of these digits you needed to wait a certain period of time or the next digit wouldn't work. Do you think you could figure out how to do this without having done it before? Now imagine also that instead of a panel with numbers on it, there are five panels with numbers on them, and the numbers are not in sequence but randomly spread about on each panel. Do you think you could figure it out now?

Even if you had the procedure written down, by the time you managed to even find the first button you needed to press you'd have been hauled out of the cockpit in handcuffs.

There is a key to the cockpit door, so there is key security. To actually start a plane, though, you really need to know what you're doing. If somebody not authorized to be in the cockpit manages to both copy the cockpit door key and also memorize the proper procedure for starting the engines, and then actually does it, well I'm not really sure what you can do to prevent that that isn't already being done. It seems so implausible as to be almost impossible.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineFlyboyOz From Australia, joined Nov 2000, 1985 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 11665 times:

Yes...I saw five Boeing people gave a key to the airline's people who bought an aircraft on TV.


The Spirit of AustraliAN - Longreach
User currently onlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9720 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11623 times:

I also remember seeing a documentary about the 777 on Discovery Channel where Boeing officials gave a key to the airline representatives after the contract was officially signed at the Boeing headquarter. This happened when the first aircraft of the type was handed over. I don't know what that key was for, but Boeing handed over a key of some sort.

Regards A388


User currently offlineJamesvf84 From Switzerland, joined Sep 2003, 129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11578 times:

If I am not mistaken I thought the MD-11s from Swissair / Swiss had keys. I saw a couple in the cockpit once (when visits were allowed), my only hesitation is that when I quesioned the pilot about the keys I was not entirely sure that he was not pulling my leg!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

User currently offlineMarbergi From Ireland, joined Aug 2004, 182 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 11574 times:

I'm sure the key you saw on the discovery channel was on a ceremonial/token key, or maybe someone got caught short and it was the key to the executive toilets at Boeing!!!

User currently offlineGeoffm From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 2111 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 11562 times:

Yes, I remember that documentary (very good it was too) and it was most definitely a *ceremonial* key.

I'm just waiting for the first announcement in the terminal: "Flight XXYYY to ZZZ has been cancelled today because the captain lost the cockpit door key down a drain"!

LOL @ UAXDXer

Geoff M.


User currently offlineAcidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 11465 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Well they might not have keys, but maybe they should. This is something for Ralph Nader to work on... Someone could just drive off with a widebody.

Even though there are no keys to start a typical commercial jet, you probably need to get pushed back, need a fuel load, and other things in order to get anywhere anyways!



Ich haben zwei Platzspielen und ein Microphone
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1585 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 11237 times:

Looks like one aircraft has keys - 'Crew Locks itself in Plane'!

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/general_aviation/read.main/1706974/





Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineBeechNut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 723 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 11118 times:

"Light piston engine aircraft do have keys to start the engine, but turboprops and jet aircraft engine starts are completed by button pushing."

Light piston twins do not have keys for engine start; they have keys for doors only. Piston singles have ignition keys that operate the magneto switch (and in later models actuate the starter; some earlier aircraft had a separate starter button or handle, and of course the earliest of all required a hand prop swing to start).

Airliners have keys for the cockpit door only. There are no keys to start the engines.

Mike
C-GTLM


User currently offlineElwood64151 From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 2477 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 10733 times:

Think about it this way: If you required a key to the aircraft, you'd need multiple dozens of copies for each pilot rated to fly it, or have them kept in a safe or other "secure" location at the airport where the aircraft landed.

Why bother with it, when it's so difficult to learn how to start the aircraft, anyway? Keys to vehicles are meant for individual operator security. Since aircraft are operated by more than one individual, it doesn't make sense to have a key.



Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.
User currently offlineFlyPIJets From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 871 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 10230 times:

No question, asked honestly, is a stupid question.

But this did make me think. Can you imagine having a delayed flight at 6 AM because the pilot can't find the keys?

 Smile



DC-8, DC-9, DC-10, F28, 717, 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, IL-62, L-1011, MD-82/83, YS-11, DHC-8, PA-28-161, ERJ 135/145, E-1
User currently offlineStearmanNut From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 352 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 10065 times:

Most light aviation aircraft have regular ignition keys. I remember most ignition switches were standard Briggs and Stratton units, much like one would find on earlier GM and Rambler cars.

As a former repo man, I found that the older GM ignition keys would operate most B&S locks. Many a Cessna and Piper have fallen to my old set of GM keys. So have a lot of Chevy's.



If wishes were horses, a Tail Dragger I would fly...
User currently offlineSLUAviator From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 357 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 9941 times:

Single engine piston poppers have keys to start them and turn the magnetos on. Usually light twins do not have keys. They have switches for the mags and buttons for the starters. I have flown a single that had a key to turn the mags on, and a starter button to actually start the engine.

I don't know if it is true or not, but I have been told that the 777s start by pressing one button and the plane takes care of the rest. How cool is that?



What do I know? I just fly 'em.......
User currently offlineInfiniti757 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 9656 times:

Corporate aircraft have keys for the door.

Elwood64151 wrote:

Think about it this way: If you required a key to the aircraft, you'd need multiple dozens of copies for each pilot rated to fly it, or have them kept in a safe or other "secure" location at the airport where the aircraft landed.

A good friend flies for a major fractional operator. Every pilot is given a key to the plane for the fleet they fly. The one key is good in the doors of all that type of plane. They keep them on their key chain or in their breifcase.

In the corporate world we have good reason to lock the plane at night. It's not so much that any one could steal the plane, but that someone might get inside the plane and vandalize the interior and steal the stores (lots of liquor) while the plane is parked in the middle of nowhere Nebraska. As far as stealing the aircraft goes one need only pull a few breakers and the plane won't start.



Give me the luxuries in life and I will gladly do without the necessities. (Frank Lloyd Wright)
User currently offlineMTChemNerd757 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 230 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 8066 times:

SLUAviator~ I have heard the same of CRJ-200s....Maybe something like get the APU on, press a button or two and in most cases, the plane does take care of itself.

brad



Fight Terrorism - Ride a Bike!
User currently offlineFLFlyGuy From United States of America, joined May 2004, 244 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 7660 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Back when we were hiring lots of new F/A's, we used to sometimes send a newbie to Operations to "get the key for the plane". Every once in a while you'd find someone dumb enough to do it!


The views expressed are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.
User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3608 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 7583 times:

I don't know if it is true or not, but I have been told that the 777s start by pressing one button and the plane takes care of the rest.

It's not true.

http://www.meriweather.com/777/777_list.html

Check out the initial checklists. Now, that's not all engine-related, but much of it is, and much of it's that not directly engine-related has to be on/off/auto/checked before trying to start the engines (stuff like electrical power, circuit breakers, pack switches, etc.).

Yes, the 777 has an engine "start" switch. All modern airliners have this switch, but it doesn't mean you just press one button in a cold cockpit and the engine starts. You have to have prepared the aircraft to start the engine. Break into a cockpit and turn this knob and absolutely nothing will happen. Even if the airplane's sitting there on battery or APU power and you flip this switch, nothing's going to happen unless the pilot's gone through the full checklist ahead of time.

There's a reason why the checklists are in the order that they are on that site - that's the order you have to go through them in. You see the engine start checklist is very short but the initial preparation checklist is very, very long and without going through it you're not even gonna get a sputter when you click that start switch on.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
25 UAL747DEN : I got a funny one for ya, like people have mentioned Boeing have silver keys that are given to the airline along with their new plane. When the 747 wa
26 PA110 : One of my swiss friends got hired as an F/A for Swissair, back in the late 80's. The issue of aircraft keys came up as part of her hazing. The day of
27 Post contains links and images UK_Dispatcher : View Large View MediumPhoto © Airsnaps When these a/c arrive on stand, the captain has to come down and unlock the hold doors, and locks them up
28 Ckfred : I know that the DC-3 had a key to lock and unlock the exit door at the rear of the cabin. I read that after DL restored its DC-3, one of the retired e
29 HAWK21M : Are all the latest jets having Keys to the Cockpit doors. Considering the Terrorist threat.If so where is it stored during flight.As it should be in t
30 Jonty : I did wonder about these keys, I know its stupid but when you hear that they are getting the key you just start to wonder
31 HAWK21M : Similiar to getting the "Key to the city" kind of ceremony. regds MEL
32 9VSRH : No...... but I'm pretty sure all the new airbuses are fitted with keypads at the flight deck door......but they definately have keypads on the QF A33
33 ZKSUJ : Seriously, the PA 28 series does
34 Post contains images Noelg : Don't you just press Ctrl+E? Noel.
35 AvionicMech : I think you will find that almost every large commercial aircraft in the UK and probably the US has this installed. I certainly know that here at BY
36 Post contains images UAcsOKC : No, the stairs can be raised by popping the panel and holding the handle in the down position until it locks down. They do however have an aerodynami
37 CosmicCruiser : I believe it's called the D.B. Cooper switch.
38 AirWillie6475 : How do they open the jet door for first flight? How do they lock the plane at the end of the day?
39 Post contains images FLY2HMO : Cessna 172 keys are as cheap and as flimsy as my fire safe's key, and they are exactly the same size!!!
40 HAWK21M : Thats where Security comes in.The doors are closed by Mx & sealed [taped] by Security unless there is a Security guard near the Entrance at all times
41 242 : Assuming the aircraft is on APU power already and bleed air is properly configured, it's just a matter of the Autostart button, two knobs, and two sw
42 Litz : Cooper Vane, actually ... Physically it's a small little wing attached to the underside of the stairs - when the plane is in flight, the little wing
43 HAWK21M : Whats this about. regds MEL
44 Post contains images Bond007 : You'll find it under the doormat if nobody is around I know it's uncommon (or unheard of) in American cars, but remember even cars don't even have ke
45 PPGMD : Different mind sets, as the Russians when they designed the aircraft were probably afraid of defectors.
46 DALMD88 : Not all aircraft take 200 movements to start. Metros were pretty easy. Unlock the cabin door with the key. All civilian Metros have the same key BTW.
47 Post contains images IslipWN : Wow, now that I see this thread that I started back in August, I feel REALLY, REALLY, REALLY stupid. I can't believe that I ever asked such a stupid q
48 Post contains links and images MD11Engineer : Most older Russian airliners had keys for the cabin and cargo doors. At Interflug in SXF in the old East german times, there was always a small booth
49 OzLAME : I remember an accident report from the early '80s where a guy who had 'had a few' managed to both start, take-off and land a Cessna in outback Queens
50 Sunking737 : Hey SY does as we just had the locks changed because someone lost their key. Thank god we only have 7 airplanes so we got a bargain from the local loc
51 Post contains links Lekohawk : http://www.crimelibrary.com/criminal_mind/scams/DB_Cooper/
52 HAWK21M : What did happen to the Guy.Did he have a parachute.Was the loot found. Whats the details. The link is still not stating the same. Didn't something sim
53 MD11Engineer : Hawk, AFAIK, Cooper left the 727 over an extremely inhospitable, mountainous area of the US and was never heard of again. He might as well be dead. Th
54 Jetstar : The Lockheed JetStar has 3 external key locks, all operated by the same key. The main entrance plug type door has a key lock, this prevents the door h
55 HAWK21M : So till date there has not been a survived Highjacker that used a parachute to escape......Something to dampen their Enthusiasm. regds MEL
56 Lekohawk : Untrue... if you navigate through the rest of the link I posted, you'll see the rest of the DB Cooper story (which I presume you missed the first tim
57 HAWK21M : Amazing.Another Mystery. Why would anyone want to Jump out with money unless the plan does not involving using the money.The only thing would be if t
58 TEBguy : I overheard the following story from a pilot, although i cannot assure it's truth, i'll relay it here for everyones entertainment: Apperently this occ
59 MD11Engineer : Sounds like a hoax. You´ll never have both pilots leaving their stations at the samwe time. This would actually be against law. Jan
60 TEBguy : this i was well aware of. But i figured i'd pass that little story along for everyone's amusement.
61 Post contains images Lowrider : New flight attendants and rampers on thier first day have frequently been sent to find the keys for the airplane, along with a spool of flight line an
62 Post contains images Bohica : Having worked in Operations for many years, I had many new hires come running into Ops looking for above mentioned items as well as items such as sev
63 Post contains images HAWK21M : Out here its called "Ragging" regds MEL
64 Post contains images IslipWN : Now I don't want to work for an airline anymore!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Do Airplanes Have Keys?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Why Do Airports Have Both 3 And 4 Letter Codes? posted Wed Oct 11 2006 00:28:23 by AirPacific747
When Do Airplanes Begin Approach? posted Sun Jun 11 2006 10:35:03 by VictorTango
Bragging Time!: How Many Ratings Do You Have? posted Mon Jan 30 2006 00:24:13 by FLY2HMO
Do Airliners Have A Key? posted Fri Jan 27 2006 00:17:00 by TheSonntag
Do We Have A Problem With Maitenance posted Thu Dec 22 2005 04:25:12 by Ualflyer
Don't Airplanes Have Washer Fluid? Photo posted Sat Dec 3 2005 01:15:06 by Airfoilsguy
Do Airliners Have Creep Marks? posted Thu Nov 10 2005 23:07:02 by Jamesbuk
Do Airliners Have Wing Spar? posted Thu Apr 29 2004 03:54:38 by A380900
How Often Do Airplanes Get New Painting posted Wed Apr 21 2004 05:36:46 by A380900
Do Airplanes Land "themselves" posted Sat Feb 28 2004 22:22:58 by Aking8488

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format