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What's a D check and what happens when it does happen?  
User currently offlineAerosvit From Ukraine, joined Feb 2004, 112 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3738 times:

What's a D check and what happens when it does happen? And are there any other checks like that?


Clava Ykraini
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3702 times:

Well....every manufacture and airframe has a different Check program. The 'D' Check is the highest level of check and in most cases, the airframe is stripped of all parts, sections are X-Rayed or extensive NDT tests are performed, indepth inspections are performed, the interior is completely gutted and some structural items are even replaced.


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 25
Reply 2, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3636 times:

In my experience at AS...a D-check was pretty much removal of everything on the a/c. This included structural inspections. Sometimes on a D-check, some things dont get removed. These checks lasts anywhere between 30-60 days. I remember doing a D-Check on N767AS back in 1998 and it was a 60 day check..it was BORING!!!

Disclaimer....I was a Technician Helper with AS at that time, so things that AS are done differently now, I think....



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 3572 times:

A D check would be primarily a structural inspection, usually done every five or six years, though it could be longer (depends on the aircraft type). It involves checking all parts of the aircraft that aren't routinely inspected during C checks. Flaps, spoilers, slats, landing gear, flight controls are all removed to give access to areas normally out of sight. Wing-fuselage fairings are removed, fuel tanks opened, etc, etc.


The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlineAvioniker From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1109 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3484 times:

Once upon a time the D Check was done after the sixth C. This could be anywhere between every six to ten years (ballpark).
There is an E Check as well but on a 747 this would take a minimum of a year and there isn't an operator around with that kind of money any more. It's cheaper to buy a newer airframe than do all the "zero timing" that would be involved.



One may educate the ignorance from the unknowing but stupid is forever. Boswell; ca: 1533
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 11850 posts, RR: 18
Reply 5, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 3415 times:
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When I visited the NZ maintaince hanger in CHC a few weeks ago, there were two QF B733s have a D check done. One of the 733s was resting on stands and I was told that everything inside has been taken out and getting checked. I was not allowed onboard this B733 as it was unsafe. The other B733 that was having a D check done I was allowed to board as it was about 2 weeks into its D check. All the cockpit instruments and seats, engines, half the passenger floor, passenger seats, doors and cargo doors had been removed and were being inspected. I was told that everything is removed from the plane and everything little inch of the plane is inspected. Its basically like looking for a needle in a hay stack.

User currently offlineLAXinYYZ From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 3397 times:

Greetings,
When I lived in California I had friends who worked for Lucas Aviation in Santa Barbara. They talked about their company’s ability to do check on a 747 that only a handful of companies were certified to do. They would tear the 747 down to the point where they would have to put the aircraft in a jig to keep it from shifting and/or collapsing. Would this be the E check or just a D check.



"Don't trust any statistic that you didn't falsify yourself"
User currently offlineImonti From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3252 times:

About 5 years ago I toured SAA maintenance hangers, I got to see a Lufthansa 747 in for a D-Check I think it was a cargo plane. Wow almost all of its paint had been sanded off as well. But what was really interesting was to see the "holes" in the wing and that a guy can clmaber inside with a torch and inspect the entire thing. It was really really cool to see it.

User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3252 times:

Those holes in the wing are fuel tank access doors. Even though you can do some inspection from inside the tank, most of the inspection of the wing structure is done using X-rays and other non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. The sealant on the tank surfaces and fasteners pretty much prohibit any cursory inspection of the underlying structure. By the way, I prefer to use the word flashlight rather than torch when dealing with fuel tanks.

User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3222 times:

The connotation of the word "flash" in a fuel tank is not so great, either  Smile.


The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
User currently offlineDalmd88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2504 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3204 times:

The proper terminology would be 'fuel tank entry approved light'. I prefer the big fluorescent drop light type.

User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13800 posts, RR: 63
Reply 11, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 3185 times:

If I can, I´ll leave the tankdiving to somebody else  Wink/being sarcastic !

Jan


User currently offlineDl1011 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 386 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3130 times:

Tankdiving. One of the few times it pays to be "calorically challenged!"

User currently offline320tech From Turks and Caicos Islands, joined May 2004, 491 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (9 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3117 times:

I beg to differ. If you're not calorically challenged, you may not even have to go in there.  Smile


The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the manufacturer and impossible for the AME.
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