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767 Floating Aileron  
User currently offlineCapt.Fantastic From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 737 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3241 times:

Here is a shot of a 767-200's wing while in flight from MIA to ATL - I noticed that the inboard aileron was floating up just very slightly during our cruise. Why is that?


src="http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/groups/g_7548763/__hr_B767200+aileron.jpg>

I zoomed in and got this shot - Can anyone tell me what I am seeing here?

src="http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/groups/g_7548763/B767-200+aileron+close-up.jpg>"



10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCapt.Fantastic From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 737 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 3219 times:

sorry .... the pic did not attach .. Ill try again.

User currently offlineKDTWFlyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 830 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3129 times:

I would guess its because the 767 is experiencing a crosswind component at altitude and that particular aileron is being deflected continuously to compensate for that crosswind.


NW B744 B742 B753 B752 A333 A332 A320 A319 DC10 DC9 ARJ CRJ S340
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3085 times:

It is not uncommon for planes with a few hours on them, and a few heavy checks and hard landings etc. behind them to be slightly out of rig. I was once non-revving on an old 737 and noticed, moving back and forth across the aisle, that both ailerons were up slightly, and one just a fraction of an inch higher than the other. There was no spoiler float going on at the moment.

After the flight I asked the captain about it. He was surprised to learn about the aileron neutral setting but said that that particular airframe had to be trimmed up manually at cruise. He had to punch off the autopilot, then trim the rudder, then the ailerons, then could put the a/p back on and it would fly with the ball in the middle. Without doing this it would not.

This was one of the early 737s that had the spirit level mounted above the ADI in addition to the "ball" beneath it. They had been using both of these instruments in trimming.

I would assume that in a D-check or the like, that the flight control rig settings would be put back to factory specs. Maybe I am wrong about this. But anyway, if they were, and if the plane had a slight wing or tail bend as a result of turbulence or something, then the factory settings might not make it fly straight and true.

I believe that this may, in part, account for the difference in cruise efficiency seen between older examples of the same type.




Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2971 times:

Crosswind doesn't matter except for navigational purposes, as long as you're not trying to land or take off. You simply point your aircraft into the wind until you are going in the intended direction over the ground - without going sideways in any way. It does make sense when you think about it.  Big grin

And I'll chime in with SlamClick. There are many beat-up airframes out there...

Regards,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineRendezvous From New Zealand, joined May 2001, 516 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2963 times:

I was preflighting one of our Cessna 172s last week, I noticed that with the controls centred that the left aileron was down about 1cm and the right one about 1/2cm. Our student pilots aren't /that/ rough on the planes are they?  Laugh out loud

User currently offlineYikes! From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 284 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 2935 times:

Ditto all the above about 30K "smooth" landings and the cumulative effect on airframes and in-flight trim.

Once the outboards are cutout (around 240 KIAS), all control is exercised by the inboards. If it takes a constant deflection of either or both to maintain direction, then that is what the autopilot commands. Sometimes, BOTH inboards are deflected, and sometimes in the same direction!

That, I haven't been able to figure out....

Yikes!


User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2683 times:

Yikes,
yikes!

Sorry. I always wanted to say that.  Smile

What type are you talking about there?

In the pointy-nose world, lots of research has gone into creating FBW systems which will reconfigure their own control laws to cope with severe damage and/or loss of control surfaces. Very interesting, but tends to dive into depths of adaptive neural networks theory and other fields of black magic that I do not wish to explore already in the abstracts. Big grin

Regards,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineCapt.Fantastic From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 737 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2583 times:

Here are the pics:



Here's the close-up of the inboard aileron



User currently offlineCapt.Fantastic From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 737 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2580 times:

In the close-up, you can clearly see what I mean by the aileron floating up just slightly

User currently offlineYikes! From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 284 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (10 years 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2482 times:

Sorry for the delay - B767



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