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Asia Part 4: REP-BKK On Bangkok Airways (pics)  
User currently offlineJsnww81 From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2036 posts, RR: 15
Posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 8799 times:

I’m sorry for the delay in posting the next installment of my Asia trip… it’s been a busy few weeks! In any event, after flying from Chicago to Vietnam via NRT, then taking a Vietnam Airlines 777 on a domestic flight to Hanoi, followed by a jog down to Siem Reap on a VN A320, it was time to move on to Bangkok, the last stop on my trip. My friends were continuing on to Krabi, in the southern part of Thailand, but I didn’t have enough vacation time to spare, alas.  Sad

For this trip we booked a simple one-way ticket on Bangkok Airways, using their very simple website. After all of the red tape associated with flying Vietnam Airlines (we had to use a travel agent to book with them since they don’t offer online booking on their US site yet) it was nice to take care of things with a few simple mouse clicks.
Anyhow, on to the interesting stuff!

******************************************************************************************************

Saturday, May 2, 2008
Siem Reap/Angkor International Airport


After four busy days in the Siem Reap area (most of which were spent exploring the massive Angkor complex… we could have used another day or two!) we woke up early to meet our driver for the quick trip to REP. The sun comes up so early in southeast Asia that getting up at 5am really wasn’t as difficult as we expected, and in no time at all we were in the car headed out of town.

A quick plug for our hotel – we stayed at the FCC (Foreign Correspondents’ Club) right in the heart of Siem Reap. The hotel itself is amazing – very modern furnishings, but lots of traditional touches. Room rates were reasonable, the service was excellent and it’s a quick jump over to the ruins. Highly, highly recommended if you’re planning a visit! I’ve got plenty of pictures up on my personal photo site, which you can check out here.

The Siem Reap airport is located east of town, in the middle of the Cambodia countryside. I took a shot as we got closer to the airport:


A few moments later we arrived at the nicely-landscaped airport entrance:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3389.jpg

REP is a relatively small airport, although it’s been expanded quite a bit in the last five years. There’s a small domestic terminal (the airport’s original terminal) and the much larger international terminal, which opened in 2006. We headed for the departures of area of the international terminal:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3392.jpg
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3391.jpg

The building itself is a real showcase – it’s built in the traditional Khmer style but with lots of modern touches. The whole structure is surrounded by tropical landscaping, and many of the lobbies and plazas are open-air. The whole setup reminded me quite a bit of airports in the Hawaiian islands like HNL, OGG and LIH:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3395.jpg

The drop-off lobby is open to the elements and has a few retailers familiar to Westerners, including a Dairy Queen restaurant:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3399.jpg

From the departures roadway we headed into the check-in hall, which was conspicuously quiet:


REP is not a particularly busy airport, although traffic has grown exponentially in the last few years. As this screen shows, much of the traffic consists of shuttles to Bangkok and Ho Chi Minh City, the two largest and closest urban centers. The most distant scheduled flight is Asiana’s service to Busan and Seoul (as you can see, today’s flight to Busan was canceled):
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3398.jpg

The only flight checking in this morning was our PG flight to Bangkok, and there were only two passengers in line ahead of us. I was able to get a window seat towards the front of the plane (I normally like to sit behind the wing, but on the 717 that usually means the engine nacelle blocks part of your view), although my friends wound up several rows behind me.

From there we walked over to the immigration counters to pay the departure tax and head through security:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3386.jpg
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3394.jpg

Another look at the landscaped courtyard between the departure and arrival terminals:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3396.jpg

Security was easy enough, and just a few moments later we found ourselves in the terminal’s cavernous departures hall. Besides the usual smattering of duty free shops and food outlets, there wasn’t too much going on:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3400.jpg

The new terminal at REP has five departure gates, all of which are at ground level (no jetbridges yet, although Phnom Penh has them.) The apron has just been expanded to include more aircraft parking positions as well – a PMT Air MD80 was resting at one of the newly-built positions:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3401.jpg

Before too long our 717 touched down on runway 3 and was pulling onto its stand:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3402.jpg

A few evocative shots of the 717 in the midst of its turnaround:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3406.jpg
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3408.jpg

When all of the passengers from Bangkok had deplaned and the aircraft had been re-provisioned, the check-in agents (who had come through security and were now gate agents!) called the passengers to board. The departure lounge was only about half-full, so they simply opened the doors and started to take boarding passes – no announcements. I think they figured that most of us would get the hint.

Looking back at the terminal as we walked out to the aircraft:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3412.jpg

Not much action happening at the domestic ramp, except for this lone unmarked 737 classic. Any idea who it belongs to?
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3414.jpg

And finally our 717, which was marked “Siem Reap Air” on one side and “Bangkok Air” on the other:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3410-1.jpg

************************************************************************************************

Bangkok Airways Flight PG924
Siem Reap/Angkor International (REP) – Bangkok Suvarnabhumi (BKK)
Departs REP 9:50am, arrives BKK 10:45am
Flying time: 50 minutes
Boeing 717-200, seat 7F (Economy Class)


Although the tailcone stairs had been lowered, the flight was boarding only through the forward door. Bangkok Air paints each of its aircraft in a slightly different color scheme, although all are bright and colorful:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3415.jpg

As I headed up the stairs, a Vietnam Airlines ATR from Ho Chi Minh City was pulling onto the stand next to us:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3417.jpg

The interior of the cabin was configured all-economy and was done up (in typical airline fashion) with blue seats and cream-colored walls. I took my window seat on the starboard side, while my friends headed several rows back. As I said, the departure lounge had been only about half-full, and for the first few minutes it looked like everyone on the flight would have room to stretch out and enjoy themselves. Just before departure time, however, a huge party of Italian tourists (probably a package tour group) came scrambling aboard, and within minutes the plane was completely full. It was much noisier too – the Italians were seated all over the plane and had no problem shouting across the aisle (or several rows ahead) to their friends. Ah, the joys of international travel…

Waiting for pushback clearance alongside the aforementioned PMT Air MD80:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3419.jpg

The crew consisted of two men and two women – all announcements were done first in Thai and then in English. Prior to pushback, the crew handed out packets with a moist tissue inside, then took their positions for the safety briefing. Our 717 pushed back about ten minutes late (thanks to the Italians’ late arrival) and began its engine startup:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3421.jpg

VN’s ATR unloading passengers and preparing to return to SGN:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3422.jpg

Once the engines were started (since I was sitting so far forward, I could barely hear them) we taxied out past the domestic terminal and the unmarked 737 I had seen earlier:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3425.jpg

Another shot of the domestic building, with the requisite picture of Cambodia’s king and queen displayed prominently near the control tower:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3426.jpg

Although it was only 10am and still sunny, it was humid enough that the sky was already full of puffy, dark-bottomed clouds. Just like Florida in the US, it rains every afternoon in Cambodia, and today looked like it would be no exception! The wind had shifted since our plane landed that morning, and now it looked like we would be departing from runway 21, at the northeast end of the airport complex. REP doesn’t have a parallel taxiway that extends the full runway length, so we turned around using the pad at the runway threshold:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3427.jpg

The captain came overhead and asked the flight attendants to take their seats, although by then the engines were already spooling up for departure. We took off smartly to the southwest, climbing out over the Cambodia countryside:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3429.jpg

I had been hoping we’d depart on runway 3 (to the northeast) since the departure track takes aircraft directly over the Angkor complex. No luck today – although as we turned off the runway heading a minute or so later, I did get a look at the West Baray, one of the ancient reservoirs dug by the Khmer empire to provide water to Angkor:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3431.jpg

During much of our climbout I was struck by how arid and dry the landscape below appeared to be. Angkor is located in a protected area, and is therefore surrounded by plenty of lush forests and jungles. Outside the park boundaries, though, much of the land has been clear-cut for cultivating rice, and there are only sporadic patches of forest left. The land really looked quite dry – our visit was just before the start of the rainy season, so maybe that had something to do with it:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3432.jpg

Before we hit cruising altitude, the crew was handing out snack boxes – with a full load and a short flying time they needed to be quick! I was grateful to get any food at all (especially coming from the US, where you wouldn’t even get this much on a six-hour transcontinental flight) but it wasn’t very good. Apart from a box of orange juice, glazed breakfast roll and sliced papaya and pineapple, there were two meaty substances inside – some sort of swirled ham cake and an odd breaded fish loaf inside. I nibbled at the ham cake but left the fish alone:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3434.jpg

Once I’d finished breakfast, I leafed through the inflight magazine, Fah Thai and had a look at some of the airline information. Bangkok Airways bills itself as “Asia’s Boutique Airline” and has carved out a nice little niche flying to some of Thailand’s lesser-known tourist destinations. The airline actually built the airports at Koh Samui and Sukhothai, and played a pretty large role in developing the tourist trade in both locations. Apart from the Thailand domestic routes, there are also flights to Hong Kong, mainland China and Japan, and a route out to Male in the Maldives. Not a bad little operation!

We heard from the captain about half an hour into the flight – he said we were approaching the Cambodia-Thailand border and would be starting our descent into Suvarnabhumi shortly. He also said we were being vectored around some thunderstorm cells to the north:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3435.jpg

About 10 minutes later we were clearly descending, over the much lusher landscape of eastern Thailand:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3436.jpg

The crew came through the aisles to pick up snack boxes and waste items as the descent continued. They also made an announcement describing transit procedures at Suvarnabhumi (I’m guessing this was for the benefit of the Italians) and told us our baggage belt number. We made a long turn to the west, flying lower over the long, thin farming parcels northeast of Bangkok:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3439.jpg

Getting a bit closer to civilization… here come a few villages:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3442.jpg

Before long the fringes of Bangkok appeared below – lots of new housing developments sandwiched in with farmland and a few industrial estates:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3445.jpg

The very impressive Bangkok skyline was visible to the west:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3446.jpg

The landing gear thumped down and we made a final corrective turn to line up with Suvarnabhumi’s runway 19R. I was surprised at how built-up the area around the airport is – given that the airport was built from scratch only a few years ago, I expected it to be in a much more rural area. I didn’t expect to see lots of new homes and warehouses sliding by as we came in on final:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3449.jpg

Finally we winged low over the Bangkok-Chonburi Expressway and touched down on 19R. As we rolled out I could see a parallel runway already under construction to the east of ours, which should bring BKK up to three runways. Considering all of the problems Suvarnabhumi had in its first year, it’s good to see that a third runway is already needed.

We had landed at the complete opposite side of the airport from the domestic stands, and made a long, slow taxi across the airport to get there. Right as we were turning off the runway, I spotted an Aeroflot IL-96 lifting off from the parallel 19L, but I wasn’t able to get my camera out in time to catch it. The remaning subjects weren’t quite as an interesting – an Air Asia 737 and a Thai A300 still wearing the old color scheme:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3451.jpg
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3452.jpg

I was sitting on the wrong side of the aircraft as we taxied in and wasn’t able to see any of the action at the terminal building – through the windows on the port side I could see plenty of Thai A300s, 747s and 777s parked at the gates. Eventually we turned onto the domestic apron and I got a nice look at this Orient Thai 747-200, parked at the long-stay apron:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3453.jpg

Another Air Asia 737 resting outside Thai’s maintenance base:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3455.jpg

Pulling onto our stand alongside a company A320:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3457.jpg

I guess PG’s 717s aren’t important to warrant a jetbridge (even though there were plenty of available ones at the terminal) so we deplaned by stairs. No problem for me!
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3458.jpg

***************************************************************************************************

Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport
Arrival


There were two buses waiting at the foot of the airstairs – the Italians were busy squeezing into the one on the left, so I headed for the much emptier bus on the right. Except for the doors, the windows of the bus were completely covered in pixellated advertisements for Bangkok Airways; I made sure to get a spot by one of the doors so I could take pictures. Here’s the domestic wing of the terminal, with a PG ATR on a neighboring stand:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3459.jpg

Once the rest of the passengers (including my two friends) had filled up our bus, it jerked to life and we set out on a long, meandering ride across the BKK aprons. I’m not sure if the driver was confused, or if that’s just normal procedure for domestic flights arriving at Suvarnabhumi, but we wound up driving underneath several of the concourses and turning around at the far end of the complex before heading back to the bus arrival gates at the central terminal building. I didn’t mind, though – more opportunity to take pictures! Here’s one of the bus departure gates at the junction of the A and B concourses:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3462.jpg

A Cathay Pacific 777-200 and Thai 747 in Star Alliance colors parked at Concourse E:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3466.jpg

A newly-painted Air Berlin A330 parked at Concourse D, along the frontage of the main terminal building:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3463.jpg

… and a closer look:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3467.jpg

Finally we shuddered to a halt in front of the arrival gates, and everyone surged through the sliding doors into the terminal. I’ve seen plenty of pictures of Suvarnabhumi, both on this site and elsewhere, and I have to join the rest of the crowd in saying the terminal is a bit of a disappointment. It’s an interesting design, but the building itself is dark and very sterile feeling, with lots of exposed concrete, tinted glass and long, unbroken stretches of terrazzo flooring. I’ll write more about BKK in the next installment of my report, but suffice to say it’s not in the same league, architecturally speaking, as other new terminals like Madrid, Hong Kong or Kuala Lumpur.

The long, cold arrivals concourse is on the lower level. Feels like being inside a parking garage!
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3468.jpg

Another shot of the arrivals concourse. A few potted plants and King Power Duty Free kiosks don’t do much to relieve the endless gray expanse:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3472.jpg

The most interesting feature of the arrivals hall were the large digital boards displaying each flight’s carousel number and location:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/DSC03006.jpg

… but you have to read them quickly, since they’re constantly switching back and forth between English and Thai:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/DSC03008.jpg

Here’s a nicer touch – a traditional Thai warrior statue outside the entrance to immigration:


Baggage claim is even worse – although there plenty of carousels (and big ones at that, so everyone has a place to stand) the ceiling is low and the room is dimly lit. More concrete columns add to the drudgery:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3474.jpg

The AOT (Airports of Thailand) has done their best to spruce up the place with flowers and some murals on the far walls:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3473.jpg

It’s only when you finally come through customs and emerge in the meeter/greeter lobby that you finally see some natural light, since that area is at the bottom of a multi-story “canyon” that extends up to the departures area. We came through Door B, and as you can see, there was plenty of action at Suvarnabhumi that time of day:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/rep%20bkk/PICT3476.jpg

There were taxi drivers everywhere, all trying to convince us to come with us (although I understand the drivers at Suvarnabhumi aren’t nearly as aggressive as they were at Don Mueang, thanks to the government cracking down a bit.) We shrugged them off and headed outside to the official taxi rank, where smartly-dressed officials directed us to a taxi, handed the driver our hotel’s address and told us what we could expect to pay.

The outside of the main terminal – pretty impressive, even if the interior isn’t:


********************************************************************************************************

That’s it for part four of the report. Bangkok was the last stop on my trip and was a bit of a culture shock after spending a week and half roaming through Vietnam and Cambodia – by comparison, it’s a bustling city filled with skyscrapers, elevated expressways, billboards and smartly dressed residents. Still, it’s a fascinating place and I thoroughly enjoyed my three days there.

The next installment of the report will cover my trip home – a BKK-HKG-LAX-ORD routing on Cathay Pacific and American. Stay tuned until then!

4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTriple7man From Thailand, joined May 2005, 743 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 8516 times:
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Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
That’s it for part four of the report. Bangkok was the last stop on my trip and was a bit of a culture shock after spending a week and half roaming through Vietnam and Cambodia – by comparison, it’s a bustling city filled with skyscrapers, elevated expressways, billboards and smartly dressed residents. Still, it’s a fascinating place and I thoroughly enjoyed my three days there.

Suvarnabhumi is an interesting airport, but it's not the greatest one for plane spotting. The city was like you described it, and even in the late night hours is very much alive.

I will look forward to your next TR



Have you kissed a 777 today?
User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4755 posts, RR: 26
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 8477 times:

Another great installment of what seemed to be an epic-like journey!

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
After all of the red tape associated with flying Vietnam Airlines (we had to use a travel agent to book with them since they don%u2019t offer online booking on their US site yet) it was nice to take care of things with a few simple mouse clicks.
Anyhow, on to the interesting stuff!

This I do not get. I had the same experience as it was so damn difficult to deal with Vietnam Airlines outside of Vietnam! Their website is absolutely useless showing webpage after webpage of information like a highschool powerpoint presentation.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
There%u2019s a small domestic terminal (the airport%u2019s original terminal) and the much larger international terminal, which opened in 2006. We headed for the departures of area of the international terminal:

I have to say, REP looks more like an airy lobby of a resort than an airport! It looks awesome though, I must say. But a tad remote and quiet looking.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
The most distant scheduled flight is Asiana%u2019s service to Busan and Seoul (as you can see, today%u2019s flight to Busan was canceled):

This has to be a charter flight, no?

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
The interior of the cabin was configured all-economy and was done up (in typical airline fashion) with blue seats and cream-colored walls.

Some interior shots of the aircraft would be good.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
Once the engines were started (since I was sitting so far forward, I could barely hear them) we taxied out past the domestic terminal and the unmarked 737 I had seen earlier:

Isn't the 717 amazing up front? I have had the pleasure of flying the DC9 and MD80 and all occassions I was seated up front. I could barely even hear the engines even as the aircraft powered up for take off! BUT walk a few rows back towards the toilets and you will start to feel sorry for those passengers seated there, a normal conversation isn't possible.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
Apart from a box of orange juice, glazed breakfast roll and sliced papaya and pineapple, there were two meaty substances inside – some sort of swirled ham cake and an odd breaded fish loaf inside. I nibbled at the ham cake but left the fish alone:

Come one, it is not THAT bad! BKK catering is one of the best in this region and they are pretty much on par (some say even better) with other fantastic catering stations like HKG and SIN.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
I was surprised at how built-up the area around the airport is – given that the airport was built from scratch only a few years ago, I expected it to be in a much more rural area. I didn’t expect to see lots of new homes and warehouses sliding by as we came in on final:

The area around Bangkok is indeed very dense. Bangkok itself is made up of several "provinces" that have expanded to join into one whole gigantic metropolis. This urban area that you saw on approach to Suvarnabhumi extends towards Chonburi and Pattaya some 100kms south! If you have read my SIN-BKK report on TR (Part One), I took a pic of Chonburi along the coast and those developements of urban areas continued right up till touchdown in Suvarnabhumi.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
As we rolled out I could see a parallel runway already under construction to the east of ours, which should bring BKK up to three runways. Considering all of the problems Suvarnabhumi had in its first year, it’s good to see that a third runway is already needed.

Indeed, Suvarnabhuni hit it's capacity limit the day it opened. This just comes to show how badly needed a new airport was. If only it was properly planned otherwise the opening fiasco would not have happened. But they seem to be trotting along fine now although the normal Thai on the street would still bitch nonstop about why the airport is lousy and the government corrupt. However, given the circumstances, it is stilla VAST improvement from Don Muang.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
There were taxi drivers everywhere, all trying to convince us to come with us (although I understand the drivers at Suvarnabhumi aren’t nearly as aggressive as they were at Don Mueang, thanks to the government cracking down a bit.) We shrugged them off and headed outside to the official taxi rank, where smartly-dressed officials directed us to a taxi, handed the driver our hotel’s address and told us what we could expect to pay.

I have to applaud the authorities for clamping down on wayward drivers. Leaving the airport is not a problem. However, they cannot control the bad sheeps from appearing if you are going TO the airport from your hotel. I will be interested to see how this problem will be tackled.



Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineDCA-ROCguy From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 4506 posts, RR: 33
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 7978 times:

Thanks for another fascinating trip report.

It's always good to see an airport designed to really incorporate a local flavor, yet still function well as an airport. Someday I'll get to one of these tropical airports that has actual tropical landscaping! I don't think I could have passed up the opportunity to say I'd had a DQ Blizzard in Cambodia.  Smile

I'm surprised that a new "grand style" major international airport like Suvarnabhumi has such dingy arrival and transit areas. If you're going to spend that much money to build massive glass-barrel ceilings, it seems to me it shouldn't be to difficult to let a little light into the baggage areas, and not have transit areas look like a parking garage. Bare concrete and exposed ductwork generally isn't the most attractive look.

What surprises me about the 717 is how quiet it is in the *back.* As you know I fly on lots of them running back and forth between BWI and ROC, and I've been seated next to the engines a number of times. The engine whine is more of a whoosh, and conversation is possible.

Jim



Need a new airline paint scheme? Better call Saul! (Bass that is)
User currently offlineDebonair From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 2429 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7745 times:



Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
except for this lone unmarked 737 classic. Any idea who it belongs to?

It's soo easy, just l@@k in the database!  duck   duck 


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bld. '79 ex CP Air, Canadian Airlines, Cayman Airwaysm, Aviateca, Phoenix Aviation and Kam Air - and now PMT AIR.


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