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HA Pilot Trip Report #2 (pics)  
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2572 posts, RR: 53
Posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Humans have a remarkable ability to become accustomed to the extraordinary. Think about people who do amazing jobs every day; doctors delivering babies or probing into the recesses of someone’s skull. Actors standing on a Broadway stage making people believe they are someone else every day (and twice on Sundays). Steelworkers who calmly sit down to eat lunch on an eight-inch wide beam hundreds feet up in the air. Yet to these people, their jobs are all familiar and comfortable. That isn’t to say they don’t feel excitement, as an actor may do as he stands in the wings, seconds before stepping onto the stage. But these actions – a surgeon slicing skin, an actor performing in front of thousands, a steelworker balancing above the void – are things they have practiced and accomplished hundreds if not thousands of times in their lives. They often choose these careers because of the challenge the jobs provide, and the satisfaction they feel when they do a difficult job with finesse and accuracy.

It is something that I have felt too. Stepping into the cockpit of a 767 is something that feels normal, natural, and very familiar. I know the sounds, smells, and sights that await me, even before I get to the airport. Yet I am also keenly aware that for just about everyone else on the plane, it is something unusual, if not amazing and/or frightening to become airborne in a third of a million pounds of metal, glass and plastic. I hear from friends that they are amazed at my job, and ‘just don’t know how I can keep all those buttons and knobs straight’. I know that what I do isn’t ‘ordinary’ by most people’s standards, but for me it has that familiar and comfortable feel.

Two and a half years after returning from furlough, my longstanding wish was granted and (thanks to my seniority and an expanding pilot group) I was able to bid back into the Seattle pilot base for Hawaiian Airlines. So I am once again doing what I started with when I was hired at HA; flying from my home to the islands. It may be extraordinary for some people, but it is just me doing what I love – flying people to and from Hawaii. Here is a trip report of a very ‘ordinary’ couple of days for me.

Day One: SEA-OGG

Our flight from Seattle to Maui leaves at 10:35am, so it’s a very civilized schedule for me. I got up around 7:30, and since it was a weekend, quietly got ready while the family slept. I grabbed a granola bar, banana, and bottle of water on the way out, and ate in the car. It was a cold and very foggy autumn morning in Seattle and I could tell winter wasn’t far off. At the employee lot off the north end of the airport I could hear the aircraft on approach almost overhead, but couldn’t see them through the mist. The fact that they were landing was heartening though, as the fog couldn’t have been too thick. When the visibility gets really low you hear the arrivals pass by less often as some of the aircraft have to either wait it out while hoping for an improvement, or have to divert to an alternate.

Here’s a photo of a Horizon Dash 8 on short final for SEA. Really!

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The short bus ride from the parking lot to the terminal was quiet, as the fog seemed to have a dampening effect on the passengers. Once inside the terminal I made it quickly up to the front of the TSA line, but had to wait a couple of minutes while they got enough people to do individual searches on three people in a row who set off the metal detectors. Meanwhile the X-ray operator kept the belt going and soon all the bags backed up into the detector. That didn’t stop her though and sure enough, bags that were waiting for their owners to come through the metal detector were soon popping off the belt and onto the floor. Finally one of her co-workers noticed and told her to stop. About that time I made it through the detector, collected my bags (which allowed her to force more bags onto the overwhelmed collection area) and took off for the gate. I passed by the rebuilt central concourse on the way out to the ‘B’ gates.

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Even though it’s been open for several years, I still think it is one of the nicer concourses I’ve seen, especially the huge windows with a view of the runways.

I arrived at gate B7 an hour and ten minutes before departure. People were already lined up at the ticket counter. The agent checked my ID against the crew list and let me down the jetway. The Captain was already onboard, a long-time Seattle resident that I had flown with many times before. The cabin crew had arrived just before me and I said hello as I walked aboard. I stowed my bags in the cockpit and said hi to the Captain. We had just flown together three days earlier so there wasn’t much new to talk about before we began our preflight preparations. We were on aircraft N587HA, originally delivered to Hawaiian in 2002, and outfitted with the ‘new look’ 777 style interior.

As I said earlier, flying an airliner may be a mind-boggling job to some, but for me it is familiar and comfortable. I ran through the initial cockpit checks, which ensures that the aircraft is set up safely and minimizes the chance that anyone would get hurt as we bring more systems online in preparation for departure.

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The setup only takes a few minutes, and I kept my uniform coat on because my next step was the exterior inspection. The fog had lifted just a little, and the visibility was creeping upward as I entered the code to go out the jetway door. Our gates are just south of the central terminal, and we have a good view of the bustling Horizon ramp.

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Even though mechanics thoroughly check the aircraft before each ETOPS flight, we still go outside and do our own inspection, more for the fact that it is our own butts that will be riding on the plane and not the mechanics. We’re looking for leaks, dents, and anything out of the ordinary.

Nose gear;


Cockpit area:
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Landing gear (looking for strut leakage, gear pins, tire and brake wear, etc):
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Tail section (with streaks of dew dripping down the rudder):


Engine (looking up the fan duct exit):


After the walkaround it’s back to the cockpit to finish the setup. We got all our flightplan and weather paperwork from the ramp agents, who received it via computer from our dispatch office in Honolulu. Thanks to technology however, we don’t have to enter all that info ourselves. Push a couple buttons on the Flight Management System computer, and it uplinks all our route, takeoff, and performance information via radio data link. Once it’s been loaded we check it against the printed plan, and we’re almost ready to go. Once we make sure the altimeters, speed bugs, and altitude settings are all correct, we run a preflight checklist. Then it’s really just a matter of waiting for the passengers to board and the fueler to bring our fuel slip showing how much he put on the plane.

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I could see that the fog was beginning to burn off a little, although every few minutes a new bank would roll across the airport and drop visibility to a fraction of a mile

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For us, as long as they are reporting visibility of at least 600 feet, we could takeoff legally. I knew it wouldn’t be a problem this morning.

For this particular flight we were expecting to burn a little over 57,000 pounds of Jet-A fuel. That equates to about 8600 gallons to get us from Seattle to Maui. The flight plan called for us to be fueled to a minimum of just over 75,000 pounds, or 11,200 gallons. The difference was because of the ETOPS rules. To be mercifully short, ETOPS rules call for us to carry enough fuel so that if we lost an engine at the mid-point of the flight we could turn either direction, descend to 10,000 feet, and fly to the nearest airport and still have enough fuel to hold and make an approach. This means that we almost always have to have more fuel onboard than would be required for an overland flight of the same length. If we flew a normal flight today, we would land with over two hours of cruise fuel still onboard.

The boarding went very smoothly, and the agent came up asking if we needed anything else. We were fine, so we said goodbye, and a few minutes later we heard the whirr and thunk of the boarding door closing. That’s our clue to sit up, put on the headsets and buckle in. The first flight attendant came in with the passenger count, then closed the cockpit door behind her.

We have a new flight planning system at Hawaiian that gives us more precise performance information for takeoff. Once we get the final load numbers via the ACARS radio ‘e-mail’ system, we input the current weather (temperature, wind, pressure) and the computers back in Honolulu figure out the most efficient takeoff speeds and flap setting for our weight and conditions. It takes just an extra minute or two after everyone is onboard, but it’s nice to have the most accurate and up-to-date information for our flight. Once that was entered into the computer we were ready to push back.

Like a clock ticking in a familiar room, the calls and procedures to get us going are very familiar, even if they don’t allow much slack time to look around. I called for our clearance to push, and got it. The Captain called for the start checklist which we finished in a few seconds. This helps us make sure that doors are closed, fuel pumps are on, lights are on, and the pressurized air is ready to start the engines. When we got the all-clear from the tug crew as they pushed us back, the Captain turned the start switch on. We watched the air turn the engine, and when it reached the appropriate speed I flipped the switch to turn on the ignition and introduce fuel to the engine. Numbers spooled across the instruments, and when the engine stabilized we started the other one. Then we called the tug crew to disconnect and watched to make sure they pulled the nose gear pin as they walked away. If not, the nose gear wouldn’t retract and it would be a short, embarrassing return to Seattle.

Flaps down to the appropriate setting, and then we called for taxi clearance. On the roll toward the runway we did our taxi check, ensuring that all but the last few items were ready for flight. As we taxied northward toward runway 16L I watched as other planes popped out of the low foggy overcast just seconds before touchdown. An Alaska 737 landed on 16C, and in the foggy air its wingtip vortexes spun and snaked their way to the surface like two writhing, ghostly snakes. As we neared the north end of the runway there were two aircraft ahead of us. A JetBlue E190 and a Skywest CRJ700 in Delta colors. The JetBlue launched, followed a moment later by the Skywest. Then we were cleared into position. The last checklist items were covered; strobe lights on, transponder on, traffic avoidance equipment on. We sat for a moment on the runway, awaiting our turn. The in-runway lights were on, diamond bright near us, fading to a dimmer twinkling gold toward the far end. The blanket of fog had lifted, if just barely. To the south we could see a thin band of brighter light, but it looked like when I was much younger and in bed under some heavy blankets, peeking out through a small hole to see if monsters were in the bedroom.

The tower cleared us for takeoff. It was the Captain’s turn to fly, so he advanced the throttles to near the appropriate setting. At his call I engaged the autothrottles which brought the engines to the exact power setting we’d programmed in the preflight setup. We accelerated down the runway and almost as soon as we rotated were into the clouds.

Positive rate of climb, gear up, and we were on our way. As rapidly as we entered the fog, we exited out the top. It was a bright and sunny morning above with the fog a thin layer of cotton balls hugging the surface of the earth. Ahead and to our left was Mt. Rainier, the bright sunlight reflecting off the sheets of ice that cover its summit.

By 1000 feet we had to turn on the autopilot, because the departure route we were following requires very tight guidance, so it is mandated that we turn on the autopilot for these departures. We climbed southward for a few miles, then over Federal Way we turned right. We leveled off at 9000 feet as a United 757 flew overhead at 10,000, entering a downwind leg for SEA. We told ATC that we had the plane in sight, and they cleared us to climb further. About the time we crossed over the Kitsap peninsula we turned southwestward, toward the coast.

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As the non-flying pilot I was kept very busy in the first few minutes. There’s a lot of paperwork to accomplish, mostly testing navigation systems and other instruments, to ensure we are legal and ready to fly the overwater leg of the trip. We both kept an eye outside too, watching for other traffic.

Our original flightplan called for us to fly south to Newport Oregon, then turn southwestward to our designated track across the ocean. We were over Shelton, Washington when ATC cleared us direct to our gateway fix, about 100 miles offshore from Newport, saving us from having to make the dogleg over Newport itself. As we neared the coast we could see the fog breaking up.

Aberdeen/Hoquiam Washington:
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We crossed the coastline near Astoria Oregon just about the time we leveled off at 36,000 feet. Shortly after that we passed under the contrail of another jet heading from Asia southward, probably toward SFO or LAX.

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Here’s a view of my main flight instruments shortly after we crossed the coastline. On the upper screen it shows that our indicated airspeed is 264 knots, which equates to Mach .795. Our groundspeed is 430 knots. On the lower map screen you’ll see that we’re heading for the gateway waypoint, named Hemlo. The blue and green triangular shaped icons show navaids, with the one ahead and to our left (ONP) being Newport, and the one behind us (AST) is Astoria. The green shading to the left is a representation of terrain. The green color means it is below us. The magenta line is our course, and you can see the waypoint of Hemlo about 160 nm ahead of us. That is where we make the turn to follow the published track across the Pacific to Hawaii.



Thirty miles before reaching the gateway fix, ATC turned us over to Oceanic Control. These are the people, based in Oakland California, who run the ATC operations for a huge swath of the Pacific Ocean. Our normal VHF radios don’t work more than a few hundred miles from land, but we can contact them on our HF radios, although it sounds more like an old 1920’s style radio than the clear communications we’re used to over land. They can’t see us on the radar either, so they rely on us giving them a position report every time we cross over a designated waypoint. We tell them where we are, when we got there, when we’ll get to our next waypoint, our altitude, and the weather conditions. Their computers crunch the numbers and can get a fairly accurate picture of where everyone is, even in the most remote parts of the world.

We cross those waypoints roughly once an hour. The process of collecting the information and radioing it to Oakland oceanic takes maybe three or four minutes. The rest of the time over the Pacific is quiet and uneventful.

After crossing Hemlo and making our report, here is what my instruments looked like. You can see that over the ocean there aren’t any navaids or terrain to show up – merely our course out ahead of us, with our next waypoint off the screen, 382nm ahead.



So this is really what the majority of my career is about. Watching endless miles of ocean pass by as the aircraft takes care of all of us as we hurtle through the freezing stratosphere.

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Before we know it, it’s time to eat. I feel fairly lucky to be a pilot at Hawaiian for many reasons, one of which is because we get the same meals they serve to our first class passengers. Our FC menu is a choice of thee out of six small tasting plates. They offer a variety of hot, cold, vegetable, and appetizer plates. I chose the herbed chicken wing with potato slices and mushroom gravy, a crab & spinach crepe, and an antipasto plate. I was hungry enough that I forgot to take a picture for you. Sorry!

An hour later, it was time for another position report, then back to doing whatever it is we do on these flights between waypoints. I wouldn’t say that we weren’t completely concentrating on monitoring our flight, but it has been known that (once in a while), some illicit reading material (i.e. newspaper or magazines) might show up on the flight deck and somehow end up in a position where we couldn’t avoid noticing what was printed on the pages. Of course, such indiscretions would never occur on one of my flights. Big grin

The Pacific rolled on. Even among airline jobs, this one is particularly easy. One leg a day, mostly daylight flying, and very few storms to worry about. Of course we do have some red-eyes, and flying across the equator and the ever-present Inter-Tropical-Convergence-Zone means we’re always deviating around enormous thunderstorms going to/from Sydney, Tahiti, and Samoa. Our interisland pilot can rack up to ten takeoffs and landings in a day. But the west coast – Hawaii flying is about as easy as it gets.



My position in the cockpit is fairly comfortable too. It seems strange when I have a friend or family member sit in my seat before or after a flight. They look awkward there, and don’t know how to place themselves or what everything means. Yet for me, it is a comfortable as an old sweatshirt. Ahead of me is the control column and primary flight instruments. Below and to the left is one of a duplicate pair of flight control computers (with the green screen). That is where we enter all the performance and route data for the flight. To the lower right (with the red tabs) is my emergency oxygen mask. The black handle above it is the crank to open my side window. Various lighting controls are on the far right edge of the glareshield.

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To my right is where I have a cupholder for my water bottle, and a little cubby-hole for my personal items like phone, logbook, and glasses.

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Waypoint follows waypoint, and our time in the cockpit is broken up into discrete hour-long segments.

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Then, before we can really get bored, we see the first indications of our destination – on the far distant horizon are the peaks of Haleakala on Maui, and Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island.

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The tempo picked up as we near the islands. I got the weather for Maui and set up our instruments for the descent and approach. The weather in Maui was normal: Hot, partly cloudy, with strong gusty tradewinds. We contacted the Honolulu ATC facility on the VHF radio, and once they picked us up on their radar, they gave us a left turn us directly toward Maui.

Our aircraft computer can calculate, using current winds, when we should start our descent so we can do it with maximum efficiency. That means staying up at altitude as long as possible (where we burn less fuel) until we can bring the engines back to idle for the descent. The computer crunches the numbers and shows us on the map where to start down. After getting a clearance from ATC, we did just that. The strong tradewinds were pushing a layer of clouds up the slopes of Haleakala, hiding all but the topmost part of the peak from view. But the airport was visible from a long ways out.

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They call Maui the valley isle for good reason. Two large mountains join the middle to form a flat valley that is close to sea level. Those mountains also work like a giant wind tunnel, forcing the tradewinds between them, and accelerating the air to a sometimes unbelievable speed. The current winds were reported at 23 knots, gusting to 28. As all that fast moving air spills around the edges of Haleakala, it gets tumbled into some occasionally brutal turbulence. There’s just no way around it; when you land at Maui, you’re going to get bounced around.

ATC cleared us onto a right-hand downwind leg and the Captain began slowing the plane and extending the flaps. I’m too busy below 10,000 feet to take any pictures, but here are a couple I took when deadheading into Maui a few months earlier, following approximately the same route.

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It is a huge change from the cold and foggy day we’d left in Seattle, but in my schizophrenic world, it was again as familiar a sight as my own living room.
The controller made us extend our downwind because of inbound traffic coming from HNL. Once they were past it they turned back toward the airport.

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My job as non-flying pilot is to make sure the checklists get done, do anything the Captain asks, and look out for other traffic. We were getting bumped around pretty good as we descended through 3000 feet, and it kept getting worse as we turned onto final. We had large variations in airspeed as we got closer to the ground, although we knew about this from experience and carried some extra speed to compensate. Out of 1000 feet we had full flaps, gear down, and were at the appropriate speed. The tower had launched a Gulfstream jet as we turned final, and then sent one of our own 717’s into the air as we closed in on the airport. The runway at OGG is the shortest one we regularly fly into with the 767’s, at just under 7000 feet. The gusty winds can play havoc with our landings, and we usually just plan on planting it on at the touchdown markers, with little thought to making it smooth. If it works out, great. But with those gusty winds it’s much more a matter of luck than any skill in flying. We crossed the threshold as the Captain wrestled with the controls, and plopped onto the runway at the 1000 foot marker. We braked and slowed to a safe speed with plenty of runway ahead. The tower told us to taxi to the end, and from there we turned back to our gate, up at the far end of the terminal. We blocked in at 1:27pm local, for a total time of 5:55. As we finished the paperwork for the flight, our happy passengers exited into a windy tropical paradise.

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More of our planes were parked at OGG, including a 717 and 767, both of which were flying interisland.

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The flight attendants were all HNL based and once the passengers were off, they went to the interisland gates for a short flight home. The Captain and I were staying on Maui, so we packed up our gear and walked out to the curb where our shuttle van was waiting for us. It was certainly a change from Seattle, yet as I’ve said, it was all so familiar – the sights, sounds and smells of a place we’ve been to hundreds of times. The van took us across the ‘valley’ of Maui to our hotel in Kihei. Along the way we saw the old sugar mill,

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and miles upon miles of sugar cane fields.

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Even the hotel is familiar, where the staff greets us by name. I went out for a long walk down to Wailea to stretch muscles unused in six hours of flying, then sat down in front of a TV to watch not only the Seahawks play football, but Tampa win the ALCS. Thank goodness for the ‘previous channel’ button on the remote! By the time the games were over it was late by Seattle standards, and the Captain had already taken off to get some dinner. So I made my way down to a local taco shop and got a burrito with mango BBQ Pork. Ono! (Good in Hawaiian). Then off to sleep as the tropical birds chirped outside my window.

Day Two: OGG-SEA

I woke up in Maui and thought, 'yeah, just another day at the office'. I got up and went for a walk south of our hotel. Even at that early hour, people were up and playing at the beach.

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I continued down the road as more people showed up clutching their beach mats, snorkel gear, and a cup of Starbucks.

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The south coast of Maui is definitely a tourist area, but the views are still spectacular. Across the water from Kihei is the small islet of Molokini (where many snorkel tours go) and the larger, but deserted, island of Kahoolawe – formerly a navy bombing range.

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It warmed up early, and by the time I was back at the hotel it was over 80 degrees. I made a few phone calls, checked my e-mails, and packed my bag. The shuttle van picked us up at 12:50pm, and got us to the airport in plenty of time for a 2:30 scheduled departure. Again we went through the TSA gauntlet (no mashed bags this time) and out to the gate. We met the Captain who'd brought our plane in. He said there were only a few minor mechanical write-ups, such as broken tray tables and inop reading lights. It turned out to be the same plane we'd flown the day before, N587HA, Pakalakala. After we'd left it in Maui, it had flown to Portland, spent the night, then came back to Maui for us to fly it to Seattle.

Once we were let on the plane I did another walkaround inspection while the Captain did the setup of the computer. The inspection only took a few minutes, and back in the cockpit familiarity reared it head again as I brought out the charts I needed, and made my 'nest' for the next few hours. Outside, our other 767 flight into OGG arrived; flight 29 from SEA, the same flight we'd arrived on the day before.

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The computer ran smoothly, our paperwork was waiting for us when we boarded, and soon all we had to do was wait for the passengers to board.

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At places like OGG, it's easy to know when to begin our last-minute preparations as we can easily see into the gate area, and when it empties out we know we're about 10 minutes or less until the door is closed.

Right on schedule the agent told us they were ready, and the boarding door closed. We pushed back at 2:28pm local, two minutes ahead of schedule. Maui's runway is very close to the terminal, and our gates are at the south end of the terminal, directly across from the departure end of the runway. We pushed back and got the engines started, and then had to wait for the safety video to end because as soon as we would start our taxi, we'd be at the hold-short line for Runway 2. We did all the taxi checklist while waiting there, and when the video was done called for clearance to taxi (all 100 feet of it). It was my turn to fly so once we were cleared to go I took hold of the throttles and control wheel as the Captain steered us onto the centerline. We were packed full with passengers, which meant we'd be using close to full power for the takeoff on the short runway. I moved the throttles up, and the Captain engaged the autothrottles. More flaps than normal also reduced our rotation and liftoff speeds. But still, it's a little unnerving to see the end of the runway coming toward us so quickly. Everything was fine though, and we lifted off with plenty of room to spare. I turned northward according to our departure clearance, and in between radio calls I had the Captain retract the flaps in increments.

We were cleared straight up to 35,000 feet, and directly to the gateway for our track back home. This time we were on a more northerly track, to try and pick up more of the westerly wind that we'd been avoiding on the outbound flight.

Familiar sights, familiar sounds. We leveled off, turned off the seatbelt sign, and I relaxed as the Captain went through all the same paperwork I'd filled out the day before. Honolulu ATC turned us loose, and we called Oakland Oceanic as we crossed the gateway fix.

Soon enough, dinner was ready. I had coconut shrimp with mango salsa, a Thai beef skewer with wasabi mashed potatoes, and a cheese & fruit plate. A few clouds right at our altitude caused some bumps, so we requested a climb to 37,000, which was quickly granted.

The waypoints went by as we raced away from the setting sun, and soon night fell upon the middle of the Pacific.

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About an hour before we crossed the gateway on the mainland side of the ocean, Oakland called us and said there were reports ahead of moderate to severe turbulence at our altitude. We requested, and got, a clearance back down to 35,000 feet, and didn't feel anything more than a light hiccup. Shortly after we crossed the gateway and contacted Seattle center, they cleared us direct to Olympia, the initial fix on our arrival to SEA. They told us to keep our speed up as they wanted to keep us ahead of other arriving traffic from the south. If you remember what I said about our descents earlier, we try and plan them to remain at idle power. Therefore, if you want to go downhill at a faster speed, the computer will plan an initial descent point that is later than if you wanted to go downhill slower (i.e., steeper equals faster). We started our descent just as we crossed the coast over Willipa harbor. The sun was all the way down, and lights from the coastal towns were occasionally visible through the broken clouds, ghostly glows that came and went. The winds at our altitude were out of the northwest at 145 knots, or about 167 mph. Those winds were what was causing the reported turbulence at higher altitudes.

We were about halfway down when ATC called back and told us to slow from 310 knots to 280. The Captain and I both sighed. We had to cross Olympia at 17,000 feet as assigned by the arrival procedure. We were on an idle glidepath at 310 knots that would put us over OLY at 17,000 feet. If we slowed to 280 we'd have to raise the nose (the engines were already at idle) to slow down. That wouldn't work as we'd end up too high over OLY, so our only other option was to extend the speed brakes. So I did, but that didn't satisfy ATC either, so they ended up making us turn right and vectored us around for a few minutes to let the other traffic (a Virgin America Airbus) get ahead of us. Finally we were cleared back to OLY to continue the approach.

Seattle had been forecast to have gusty winds, low clouds, and rain. Fortunately the actual conditions were better than that. As we passed over Tacoma and turned north over Puget Sound on our downwind leg. I could see the airport to our right, with just a few scattered clouds over the runways. It had been raining earlier, but had cleared out nicely.

I followed the instructions from ATC, and also slowed the plane as we got lower. They turned us to the east over north Seattle, then southeast to intercept the final approach course for runway 16C over Greenlake at 3000 feet. We were moving in and out of a few clouds, but the weather wasn't bad at all. We turned on the engine anti-ice as we entered the clouds to prevent any buildup of potentially damaging ice. We passed by a beautifully lit-up downtown, which included a spectacular string of blue lights across the top of Qwest field, the home of the Seahawks.

I could see that the aircraft ahead of us (Delta) was slowing early, so I did the same in order not to get too close behind him. If I hadn't, I might have had to make a go-around if they hadn't been able to clear the runway before we were ready to land.

But the spacing worked out well. Just as we passed Boeing Field we broke out of the last layer of clouds and saw the airport ahead. I kept the autopilot on, because if the Delta plane slowed more, or was late getting off the runway, it's much easier doing a go-around with the autopilot than hand flying it. We were about 1000 feet above the airport when I saw them turning off the runway I clicked off the autopilot and autothrottles, and hand flew it the rest of the way. The winds were very steady, and with just a little bit of luck, I kissed the rain-slickened runway for a very smooth touchdown. It doesn't matter what kind of efforts you've made to give everyone a safe, professional flight, it's always the landing that they judge you on. Hopefully, I did well in all those areas.

We turned off about 2/3 down the runway, crossed 16L, and were looking almost directly at our gate B7. A quick turn right, then left again, and ground control cleared us to the gate. I barely had time to finish my after-landing checklist before we gently bobbed to a stop and shut down the engines. We finished at 10:47pm, for a total time of 5:19. It only took a few minutes to finish our paperwork, pack our bags, thank the flight attendants, and head out the door. As the Captain and I walked through the terminal, one of our passengers stopped and thanked us for such a pleasant flight. "It was like we were on rails the whole time. It was great!" he said. It's always nice to hear comments like that from the people who help pay our salaries.

Just another flight? For me, I guess so. That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy it though. I've spent many years going through up and down times in this industry to get where I'm at now. I love the job, and Hawaiian is a great company to work for. I get to do a job I've been working toward for more than half my life. Yes, it is a familiar and comfortable feeling to sit in this cockpit:

http://pic18.picturetrail.com/VOL916/486919/8101425/339753185.jpg

But that doesn't mean I don't love and appreciate what it is I get to do every time I go to work.

HAL


One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
53 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTurkishWings From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1453 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Excellent report. It's always a pleasure to read a pilot report... Thanks for sharing your experiences with us...


Coffee - Tea or Me?
User currently offlineCptRegionalJet From Germany, joined Oct 2007, 123 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Hi HAL,
thank you for a very interesting read with excellent pictures.You sure know how to describe our everyday life to the non aviation people.

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
An hour later, it was time for another position report, then back to doing whatever it is we do on these flights between waypoints. I wouldn’t say that we weren’t completely concentrating on monitoring our flight, but it has been known that (once in a while), some illicit reading material (i.e. newspaper or magazines) might show up on the flight deck and somehow end up in a position where we couldn’t avoid noticing what was printed on the pages. Of course, such indiscretions would never occur on one of my flights.

Mhhh,never happens on our flightdecks either

 Big grin  Big grin  Big grin

Safe Flights,

CptRegionalJet


User currently offlineSalvation From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

THANK YOU for sharing your journey! It's always a pleasure to see "cabin" trip reports, but reports from the "office" are a definite treat! I can relate to the landing experience in OGG...some days it's nice and smooth and others it's hell on earth - all in good fun none the less and what more, with experienced pilots like yourself up front, there's nothing to worry about. Please share more of your journeys if you have time to places with more interesting routing like that of PPG, PPT, SYD, or MNL.

User currently offlineGjunnar From Germany, joined Sep 2001, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Awesome report, excellent writing - thanks so much for sharing.

User currently offlineMidcon385 From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 570 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

HAL,

Thanks for your excellent trip reports! It's always a pleasure to read of your journeys. Hope to see more soon!

Tim



MidContinent Airlines: We Know How To Fly!
User currently offlineDALCE From Netherlands, joined Feb 2007, 1722 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Great report and what a great read!
It is always nice to read report from the 'office upfront' , it must be a very very boring job up there Big grin
Thanks for sharing, I really appreciated it!

Joost ( D-ALCE )



flown: F50,F70,CR1,CR2,CR9,E75,143,AR8,AR1,733,735,736,73G,738,753,744,77W,319,320,321,333,AB6.
User currently offlineRleiro From Venezuela, joined Jan 2006, 499 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Thank you for such a nice trip report and show us a different perspective of air travel.

Saludos,

Roberto.



A proud SVZM Spotter!
User currently offlineANITIX87 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 3309 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 32767 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

One of the best reports I've ever read here.

Fantastic writing and a great insight into what you do!

Some questions that came to mind...

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
Push a couple buttons on the Flight Management System computer, and it uplinks all our route, takeoff, and performance information via radio data link.

I assume that you can change your flightplan if you want to, yes? Or do you have to follow the one dispatch gives you? And I assume the FMS has all the SIDs and STARs built into it so you don't have to input all the procedures?

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
and the pressurized air is ready to start the engines.

This is something that was discussed in my thermodynamics lab yesterday, but on a far smaller scale. The engine we are using in lab has a tank of compressed air. Do aircraft have the same thing? Where does the pressurized air come from?

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
and watched to make sure they pulled the nose gear pin as they walked away.

Do they keep the nose pin for your particular 767 or can they use it if, let's say, an AA one comes in? And I assume OGG has a duplicate for when you arrive?? Or, do you take it with you?

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
After getting a clearance from ATC, we did just that.

What is the normal descent rate? I know it varies based on speed, altitude, procedures, and efficiency, but is a 3 degree descent the norm when coming down from cruise as well? Along the same lines, what about ascent procedures? I know these vary as well, but it feels like the climb starts out pretty steep all the way to about 10,000 feet (I'm going to guess 2000fpm) and then slows as you get higher (to around 1000fpm?). Also, what are normal climb and descent IASs?

Again, fantastic report, and sorry for the technical questions!

TIS



www.stellaryear.com: Canon EOS 50D, Canon EOS 5DMkII, Sigma 50mm 1.4, Canon 24-70 2.8L II, Canon 100mm 2.8L, Canon 100-4
User currently offlineDaviation From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

HAL, it's always such a pleasure to read your reports. I printed out all of your older reports, placed them in a binder, and -- I'm not sure if I should say this -- keep it in the bathroom for some enjoyable "library" reading! You once mentioned that you're working on a novel. I'm actually a big deal at a major publisher, so if you have an agent (or need the name of one), I'd be happy to lend a hand.

User currently offlineJetBlueGuy2006 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1665 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

HAL, great report. couple quick question. Is SEA the only mainland base for HA? Also, do the SEA based crews bid for the charter work HA does for professional sports teams?


Home Airport: Capital Region International Airport (KLAN)
User currently offlineUAL757 From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 807 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Wow this is amazing, thank you so much for putting your time into this!

Great read and pictures!


User currently offlineAtrude777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 5702 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

HAL-

An excellent trip report to read! Everytime I fly, I always think and thank the crews when I fly as a passenger because it is you guys along with ATC and Flight Attendants that are what gets us there safely.

Enjoyed the pictures too and looking forward to any others you write up!  Smile

Alex



Good things come to those who wait, better things come to those who go AFTER it!
User currently offlineBlatantEcho From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1922 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Absolutely excellent. Thanks for sharing two days in the life.

We love seeing you HA guys in Portland  Smile



They're not handing trophies out today
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2572 posts, RR: 53
Reply 14, posted (6 years 2 months 23 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Thank you all for your kind comments.

Quoting Salvation (Reply 3):
Please share more of your journeys if you have time to places with more interesting routing like that of PPG, PPT, SYD, or MNL.

My last HA trip report was a HNL-SYD trip: http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/trip_reports/read.main/94689/
Since I'm now based in SEA, my trips are almost exclusively SEA-HNL and SEA-OGG. Once in a while we do get an odd trip somewhere else, and we also do some charters for the Raiders and Seahawks. But it will be a while before I'm doing regular trips to some of those places you listed above. That's OK in my book though - I'd much rather have my current schedule and be based at home than fly to more exotic destinations and have to commute to HNLBig grin

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 8):
I assume that you can change your flightplan if you want to, yes? Or do you have to follow the one dispatch gives you? And I assume the FMS has all the SIDs and STARs built into it so you don't have to input all the procedures?

We could change the flightplan if there were some reason, but the people in dispatch usually know a lot more than we do in the cockpit about weather, winds, traffic & delays. It would require a call to dispatch to have them compute a new flightplan, fuel load, and performance data, then have them send the new plan to the appropriate ATC facilities. In real life, it would take some extraordinary circumstances to have us decide to do that.
Yes, all the arrivals and departures are in the box, so if local ATC does change how we get to or from the airport, it's easy to change.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 8):
The engine we are using in lab has a tank of compressed air. Do aircraft have the same thing? Where does the pressurized air come from?

The APU in the tail of the aircraft provides electrical power and compressed air that runs the air conditioning system, and starts the engines. If the APU is inop, we use an external air cart that pumps compressed air into the ducts for engine start.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 8):
Do they keep the nose pin for your particular 767 or can they use it if, let's say, an AA one comes in? And I assume OGG has a duplicate for when you arrive?? Or, do you take it with you?

I'm not sure, but I think all gear pins are a standard size. If not, there aren't too many varieties. Each type of airplane would have the same pins, no matter which airline. The tugs have their own pins, and keep them when unhooking from a plane. We do have a set of gear pins onboard, but they're rarely used.

Quoting ANITIX87 (Reply 8):
What is the normal descent rate? I know it varies based on speed, altitude, procedures, and efficiency, but is a 3 degree descent the norm when coming down from cruise as well? Along the same lines, what about ascent procedures? I know these vary as well, but it feels like the climb starts out pretty steep all the way to about 10,000 feet (I'm going to guess 2000fpm) and then slows as you get higher (to around 1000fpm?). Also, what are normal climb and descent IASs?

Standard procedures don't usually rely on a specific climb rate. Instead, we keep engine power at a standard climb setting (or idle for descent), and adjust our pitch to obtain our desired airspeed. That airspeed is really our target during climbs and descents, not a specific rate. Yes, the actual angle will be somewhere in the 3 degree range, and I think we can find that number somewhere in the FMS system, but to us, it is trivial information.

For the specifics in climb, we are limited to no more than 250 knots indicated airspeed when below 10,000 feet. Since down low are engines are producing the most power (denser air) and we're trying to maintain a lower airspeed, we do have a steeper climb angle. Once the plane is cleaned up after takeoff and we're at 250 knots, our climb rate (in the 767) can vary hugely depending on our weight. An empty ferry flight? It's pegged somewhere above 6000fpm. Going out of HNL to SYD on a hot day packed full with people and baggage? Maybe a couple thousand fpm if we're lucky.

Once we're above 10,000 feet, we do lower the nose somewhat, and allow the plane to accelerate - while climbing slowly, at around 1000 to 1500fpm - until we're up to the speed that the plane has calculated as most efficient for the climb. That is normally somewhere between 310 and 340 knots. Then we hold that indicated airspeed until our mach reaches our most efficient climb mach (.78 to .82, depending again on weight and desired economy). Then we hold that indicated mach until reaching our cruise altitude.

Normal airspeeds for descent vary even more. Best economy speed at normal weights is around 290 knots indicated. But if we're late (or if ATC directs) we can do anything up to maximum allowed indicated, 350 knots. Normal descent rates start out at 2000-3000fpm, although if we max out the airspeed the rate could again peg the meter at more than 6000fpm down. As we get lower in the atmosphere and indicated airspeed more closely matches true airspeed, the descent rate decreases.

Quoting Daviation (Reply 9):
You once mentioned that you're working on a novel. I'm actually a big deal at a major publisher, so if you have an agent (or need the name of one), I'd be happy to lend a hand.

Yes, I did, yes, it is finished, and yes, I do need one. PM and/or e-mail is coming your way soon!

Quoting JetBlueGuy2006 (Reply 10):
Is SEA the only mainland base for HA? Also, do the SEA based crews bid for the charter work HA does for professional sports teams?

At the moment yes it is the only mainland base. LAX and SFO closed during our bankruptcy several years ago. But who knows - everything changes over time, and we may someday have more again. Some of the Raiders & Seahawks charters do originate out of SEA, and they're lots of fun!

Thanks again everyone. It makes the work of developing these trip reports well worth the effort.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineBA319-131 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 8589 posts, RR: 54
Reply 15, posted (6 years 2 months 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Thanks HAL,

Really enjoyed your report of life in the front office.

I certainly agree, for you it is just another day, but for us, it's always a special moment every time we step on a plane, well it is for me and I fly lots!

Look forward to more reports from the front office.

Best Wishes

Mark



111,732,3,4,5,7,8,BBJ,741,742,743,744,752,762,763,764,772,77L,773,77W,L15,D10,30,40,AB3,AB6,A312.313,319,320,321,332,333
User currently offlineCmk10 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 513 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (6 years 2 months 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

That night shot you have of the cockpit is amazing, one of the best pictures I've seen. I liked the way you wrote this report, the contrasts between the routine and what to me is an amazing job. I also found it funny that we both take the same breakfast and eat it the car on the way to work but you're going to defy gravity and I'm going to my office to sell electrical supply parts. I look forward to your next report!


"Traveling light is the only way to fly" - Eric Clapton
User currently offlineBoeing764 From Canada, joined Apr 2001, 298 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 2 months 2 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Thanks for another great trip report HAL, I've been looking forward to reading another one from you for a long time.


From Dr. King's America to Nelson Mandela's Africa, the journey of equality moves on.
User currently offlineAirlineBrat From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 657 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I really enjoyed reading your trip report. The pictures were incredible. I have had the privilege to fly HA in 1972, 1983 and last January. HA is an outstanding airline and all the employees I have met are some of the best in the industry. I appreciate your level of detail and ability to explain some of the more technical aspects of aviation in a way that us non-pilots can understand. I learned quite a bit. Especially........

Quoting HAL (Thread starter):
This helps us make sure that doors are closed, fuel pumps are on, lights are on, and the pressurized air is ready to start the engines. ...................the Captain turned the start switch on. We watched the air turn the engine, and when it reached the appropriate speed I flipped the switch to turn on the ignition and introduce fuel to the engine.

I have never noticed the difference in sound between these two stages before. When I was younger, I worked as a brakeman and fireman on the Mount Washington Cog Railway. While working on a coal and steam powered engine, with a little experience you can hear when the engine is going too fast, too slow or just right. Especially when you are going down the steepest grade on the line which is around 37%. If something needs to be adjusted or breaks, you can hear it.

My father and step-mother are retired UA employees and I have been fortunate to fly extensively around the country and now the world. My mother thinks I have flown close to a million miles. I have all my pass and ticket stubs dating back to the early 80's and need to spend several weeks on Flight Memory. My father may have stubs from before then ranging back to 1965.

Thanks again!!



I'm leavin on a jet plane. Don't know when I'll be back again....
User currently offlineBW424 From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Sep 2008, 1436 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (6 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

WOW.Amazing TR!!I felt like I was there the whole time!!Hope to see more from you soon.


It is what we think we know already that prevents us from learning.......
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2572 posts, RR: 53
Reply 20, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 32116 times:



Quoting AirlineBrat (Reply 18):
I worked as a brakeman and fireman on the Mount Washington Cog Railway.



Quoting AirlineBrat (Reply 18):
My father and step-mother are retired UA employees and I have been fortunate to fly extensively around the country and now the world.

Small world! I rode on the Mt. Washington cog railway when my parents took me on a trip through New England when I was a youngster 'way back in 1971. It's still a wonderful memory. And my father was a pilot for UA from 1937 to 1973 - Boeing 247, DC-3, DC-4, DC-6, DC-7, DC-8, and 747. That was a whole world of memories I treasure too. (I just got a slide scanner and hope to post some of his incredible pictures from that era on A.net someday soon too).

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8289 posts, RR: 26
Reply 21, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 31925 times:

HAL, just out of curiosity, how are the controllers out in Hawaii compared to say the PacNW or West Coast? Are they a bit more, laid back, as it were?

If you're going into HNL, would it typically be as published on MAGGI2 or another approach or do they pretty much do strictly radar vectors with all that available space to move you guys through?



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2572 posts, RR: 53
Reply 22, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 31546 times:



Quoting Aaron747 (Reply 21):
HAL, just out of curiosity, how are the controllers out in Hawaii compared to say the PacNW or West Coast? Are they a bit more, laid back, as it were?

If you're going into HNL, would it typically be as published on MAGGI2 or another approach or do they pretty much do strictly radar vectors with all that available space to move you guys through?

If you didn't look out the window and couldn't see the islands coming up, you'd never notice the difference in controllers from anywhere else in the US. OK, maybe they don't talk as fast as the tower controllers at JFK or EWR, but they're just as professional as those on the mainland.

Arriving from most places on the mainland we will enter on one of the gateways for the MAGGI arrival. But once in radar contact they'll almost always clear us direct to one of the waypoints further down the arrival, normally BAMBO or MAGGI. If it's a a really busy part of the day - like when the large bank of arrivals comes in around noon - ATC will issue speed restrictions to much of the traffic to keep everyone properly spaced out. Traffic coming in on the southernmost route is usually on the JULLE arrival that comes in over Lanai. On that arrival, the traffic is more likely to stay on it until near the airport. No matter which arrival though, there's very rarely any extensive vectoring, unless the weather is really down and they have to space everyone even farther apart. That usually happens when there's a Kona wind and we're using the LDA approach to the reef runway, 26L.

It may seem like there's a lot of airspace around the islands, but when you've got so many widebodies aiming for the same piece of concrete at the same time, it can get as busy an almost any other airspace in the US.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineSfomb67 From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 417 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 31536 times:

Wow....great trip report. I worked 767's for about 12 years until I retired, and they are still my favorite. You are really lucky to be in this position, although it sounds like you took your lumps getting there. In regards to the N/G pin; you are refering to the steering lock-out pin, aren't you?


Not as easy as originally perceived
User currently offlineAAden From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 835 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 31505 times:

Always a pleasure to read your reports hal


AAden


25 RockyRacoon : Thank you for sharing... Very Enjoyable Report
26 Sfuk : HAL, Top notch!! I love reading trip reports but reading one from a pilots point of view was awesome! I'll be taking my first trip to OGG in Feb and l
27 AAden : HAL, would you mind telling me what the max range for that aircraft is?
28 HAL : Yes, it is the steering bypass pin that they keep on the tug. For those who don't know, the bypass pin keeps the hydraulic system from operating the
29 AAden : Thanks for the info hal, I'm suprised that the 763ER doesn't have a longer range with passengers and cargo. i would have guessed that it would have be
30 SXDFC : Hey HAL Great TR! I enjoy the pictures and the FO views! By the way did you ever get my PM?
31 HAL : For the Seattle based pilot at HA 99% of the flights are either between SEA and HNL or SEA and OGG. Once in a while there's something different throw
32 Christao17 : Beautifully written report; really gives us a peek into your day at the office. Thanks.
33 AustrianZRH : You mean like it would never happen in my office that while waiting for some vacuum equipment to be pumped down the browser would direct itself to an
34 September11 : I agree!
35 ANstar : Wow - Great trip report. Nice to see it from a different perspective. I can't wait to fly Hawaiian from SYD-HNL..... (even better you are now partners
36 HaYnFlyer : Ditto all the nice comments made so far. I read this report for the first time last week and it made me decide to become a (paid) member just so that
37 22886 : Really enjoyed reading your report, great photos too! You gave an excellent insight in to the daily life of a pilot and I hope thats what I will be do
38 Emirates777300 : HAL what another wonderful trip report. Great pictures btw
39 Divemaster08 : Excellent TR! I love the 767s and if i could become a pilot, i wouldnt mind getting to get up front in one of those! I have an interesting question fo
40 UA935 : Great trip report HAL, thoroughly enjoyable read.
41 HAL : In the US, it would be extremely rare (if not impossible) for a major airline to takeoff without a clearance to their destination. As a rule, we are
42 Speedbird2263 : Hey HAL awesome trip report. I mean being from the ''islands'' myself I really felt as If I was there and being a diehard plane driver trying to get f
43 FutureUALpilot : Thanks for the report, you have my dream job! I hope to see many more from you in the future, and I hope someday I'll see you up there.
44 Vio : Excellent report. Your writing is fantastic. I hope to see more reports for you in the future. Regards, Vio Vancouver, Canada
45 EWRkid1990 : What you do is amazing. Thanks for the awesome reports. Haha lucky you gets to sail the skies between some of the most beautiful places on earth for a
46 ThirtyEcho : HAL- Gear Lever question: I noticed that the gear lever is in the down position on the ground, both prior to takeoff and after landing, but is in the
47 HAL : ThirtyEcho, The gear lever does not move by itself. We move it to the 'off' position once airborne to remove the hydraulic pressure from the gear sys
48 Daviation : I just happened to take a peek into the Trip Reports section and saw that this thread had been brought back to life with more replies That's right --
49 FXramper : The site knows your a pilot. Looks like all the others you report on. Thanks for sharing.
50 HAL : I guess I couldn't please 100% of the people here. (Wow, I'm a pilot?!?!) HAL
51 Transpac787 : Who knows, we all may have needed a collective reminder. Same as how we, from time to time, seem to need a collective reminder about 'Uncle Jimbo' be
52 Jayeshrulz : Just Awesome. I have read a pilot TR for the first time in my life and it pushes me near to it every time i see a pilot/airliner. Always Looking for a
53 DL752 : A different perspective! Amazing report and pictures. DL752
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Pakistan Int'l B747-240BM Trip Report (Pics/Video) posted Sun Feb 11 2007 10:03:09 by N178UA
Hawaiian Pilot Trip Report posted Wed Feb 7 2007 22:52:58 by HAL
Pilot Trip Report (SIN-DEL-CPH-BLR-SIN) posted Sat Nov 11 2006 10:31:12 by PhilSquares
Help W/ Link To WN Pilot Trip Report posted Wed Oct 18 2006 16:13:14 by MoPac

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