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Software Surprises On Emirates: BKK-DXB Vv On A380  
User currently offlineAirpearl From Malaysia, joined May 2001, 950 posts, RR: 26
Posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 31219 times:




Be forewarned: what you are about to read will either delight or infuriate you.

Some airlines, more than others, evoke strong, emotional responses from members of the A.net family. Let’s face it: we’re all kinda wacky – it’s just degree of wackiness that sets us apart – but certain airlines have that knack of bringing the craziness to a new level. The evidence is liberally sprinkled all over the civil aviation forum, while this forum provides supporters and non-believers alike plenty of fodder to feed their prejudices. Like religious zealots, our unquestioning support needs no rhyme or reason, while hatred, when meted out, overflows with bile aplenty. Sometimes, I think disputes and arguments for no good reason are why we’re here.  

And so we come to Emirates. If you’re looking for an explosive discussion, a thread starting with what do you think of Emirates? has very good prospects of igniting that lethal spark. Not that that’s my intention here. But I recognize Emirates is the sort of airline that, on A.net, you either love or hate: there appears to be no comfortable middle ground.

So, in a way, I am on shaky ground from the word go. There may be some airlines I will readily admit to being partial to – and a few I am not so keen on – but I can quite honestly say that with EK, I am almost entirely neutral about. And to be brutally honest, it’s an airline I wouldn’t prioritize flying given a choice. Don’t get me wrong: I think the carrier’s growth story and innovations are exciting and impressive, while the scale of these developments is unrivalled by any other airline today. Much like debt-ridden Dubai itself, EK’s progress seems to defy conventional logic – a factor that irks a number of A.net members. But EK’s very success coupled with its brash expansionary fervor creates little urgency for me to fly EK: sooner or later, every one of us will have been aboard an Emirates A380… there’s always a more urgent trip to make on another airline. (Still, the ongoing financial crisis engulfing Dubai may well put that assumption to the test these coming months.)

This trip to the emirate in late September therefore came about at an opportune time, and right price – the chance to add to my ‘A380s flown’ list figured high in the decision – while getting aboard Emirates was an almost by-product. From reading the many previous EK trip reports, I am well prepared for an overload of hardware. I am expecting tons of bling and build high hopes for the airline’s ICE system. And of course, flying the A380 is a highlight in itself. Those are what I expect to be the key takeaways from this return flight.

But, as is sometimes the case, what emerged in the end was something completely unexpected. The glitzy hardware was nice enough but unbelievably, it was the software that shone brightest. Please read on, and tell me if you agree.





I am joining the Emirates flight from Bangkok. To get there, I make a short connecting hop from Kuala Lumpur on Thai Airways. Thanks to its usual quirky ways, TG flies one of its shortest international sectors with its longest-range jetliner: the Trents above belong to HS-TLC, one of the airline’s four gorgeous A340-500s. (This is all I will say about the flight, but you can read this trip report from last year – admittedly tad premature as a farewell – to get a feel.) The machine, here minutes from touchdown at Suvarnabhumi, is scheduled later today for the nonstop to LAX.


heading out





The walk from my arrival gate at C9 to the Emirates gate and lounge at concourse E is a bit of a long haul. I had once rushed across the huge airport barely making a 60 minute connection, but today, it’s a leisurely stroll… I have almost seven hours between flights! Perhaps I had been a little bit too prudent in my planning and could have paid some friends a visit in the time, but I really didn’t fancy the trek into town today. After all, airports can generally keep me quite happy for many hours   The Emirates transfer desks are not open so early before the flight, so I take the escalators up one level where prominent banners lead me to the airline’s premium lounge.





A young cleaner, temporarily manning the reception, looks a little startled when I show up at the door. (She was obviously assured that absolutely nobody will show up this early…) On the verge of a small breakdown after seeing me, she smiles uncertainly, lets out a little scream “s’kku na kah,” [wait a moment please] and rushes off in a mild panic to get the lounge agent who is on her lunch break. These quintessentially Thai moments are wonderful and make me suddenly yearn for my Bangkok days. A series of polite apologies breaks out among all of us when the agent appears, and I am promptly let into the lounge as its only guest. A few moments later, the Business Class boarding pass for my DXB flight is handed to me – rather too efficiently I feel – and I am sat here wondering what to do for the next six hours…





The main part of the Emirates Lounge is a spacious, open plan place decked out in the airline’s signature cream-colored leather chairs and sofas. Full length windows line one side of the room, which is not surprising seeing Southeast Asia’s busiest airport is encircled by glass walls, but ironically there’s no particularly good view – which, unfortunately, is also not a surprise for Suvarnabhumi. Here we get only a peek into a work-in-progress garden landside, and the main driveway to the terminal behind it but we’re on the wrong side of the building for a view of the tarmac.





Moving into the inner sanctum of the lounge, you will reach the dining area, separated from the main area by a glassy partition. On first impressions, the place looks a little utilitarian – like the breakfast room of a small tourist class hotel – but based on size (seating for 36 diners) and F&B spread alone, this is certainly one of the more impressive airline facilities I’ve visited. Like the main lounge itself, there is no one here at 3 p.m. The early afternoon flight to Hong Kong left an hour ago, while the next Emirates departure (to SYD and CHC) is not due until 7.50 p.m.





It may be the middle of the afternoon between meals and – apart from one slightly mad guy with his camera – there aren’t any passengers around; but this airline certainly doesn’t skimp on lounge catering. On display around a central service rotunda is a tempting selection of appetizers, sushi, salad, cheese and desserts, more extensive than most airlines.







The hot dishes include a generous selection of fried finger foods, two soup selections, and two other main courses I can’t remember what now. There is also an equally wide selection of bottles-on-demand from the bar that’ll keep many pre-flyers quite happy for hours, I’m sure.  





I usually try to restrict photos I post of airline lounges to a minimum as most of us are here for the flying experience. And in any event, most of my lounge visits are mercifully short, and generally deserve little comment. My stay today is however a little different: it is far longer than usual, and the absence of any other passenger – I am the sole customer for over an hour – allows me the luxury of time, space and privacy. And besides, the food selections do look rather nice, no?







With free wifi and a backlog of work, the hours pass easily enough. For the first two hours, the entire lounge doesn’t house more than five passengers, so I feel comfortable enough to spread out anywhere. There is a windowless business center with the usual amenities but the restaurant is a far more cheerful and comfortable work space, so that’s where I stay most of the time, guarding the food.





Three hours into my stay at around 6 p.m., the passengers on EK418 bound for Sydney and Christchurch start to trickle in, and then later for the Dubai flight too. The thing I notice about EK’s premium passengers (at least those in this lounge) compared with some of the more “traditional” legacy carriers is how less stuffy they are. They’re definitely younger and more casual: for instance, a couple of guys in flip flops aren’t in fact penny saving backpackers, but First Class passengers on the A380! The place doesn’t get crowded by any means, but the luxury of doing anything I want in my “own” space quickly disappears. I decide to stretch my legs a little and escape through the main doors into the airport proper.





Now, much as I like many things Thai, “Suwanaphoom” is not among them. I have many gripes, but the lack of a decent airfield view – despite this being one of the glassiest airports I know – must top that list. There is little sensation of being at one of Asia’s most important aviation hubs as you wander down the central concourse; the excitement of flying has been downgraded to a mere byproduct of duty-free shopping. (Give me the old, crowded Don Mueang any day!) Admittedly, there are unique features – some of them rather attractive too – but the experience is marred by designs that don’t work particularly well for a busy international airport, like the complex maze of levels between check-in and the gate, windows that are perpetually stained and dirty because they are almost impossible to clean, and “moody” low lighting at places like departure gates that’s not practical at all. In fact, practicality in general appears to have been low on the airport architects’ list of priorities.







Some parts of the 2006-opened terminal are decked out industrial style with exposed pipes and fittings and bare concrete – but I’m still unsure whether this was by design or a consequence of the construction running seriously late and over-budget.

Still, there’s no denying Bangkok’s an interesting place to people watch – there are European backpackers sleeping rough along the chilly corridors, stunning Russian models in dangerous stilettos, loud Chinese package tourists on shopping orgies and almost everything else in between – the diversity is simply amazing. I see an army of EK uniforms heading for the gates at about 7 p.m. and guess they’re bound for the Sydney flight. But as I tail them to concourse E (okay, just thought I’d clarify here just in case: this is not some weird fetish of mine… just a guy with too much time on his hands!), I realize they’re the crews operating my flight to Dubai, already at the gate some 2 hours before departure. Now, that’s early!





I get back to the lounge, pack my things and set off leisurely for the gate. By the time I get there (more than an hour before our scheduled 9.25 p.m. departure), almost all Economy passengers have boarded and I am invited to head straight aboard. I so want to catch a picture of my first EK A380, but my attempt is an utter failure: it is pitch black outside and I can just barely make out an outline of the whale jet through the filthy windows. Boy, I really dislike this airport!





Gate E4 is one of the airport’s A380 gates and equipped with three aerobridges, one of which is linked to the upper deck of the plane. The F and J classes are all upstairs, so I follow the signs turning right and up the gentle incline headed for the dedicated premium entrance. As it’s still awhile yet to departure, it’s eerily quiet as I wander alone towards the giant plane – not what I imagined how it’ll be at all when boarding the world’s largest passenger jet.





Bangkok to Dubai
Emirates Airline flight 373 in Business Class
Departs 9.29 pm, Arrives 12.34 am (next day, four minutes late)
A380-861 A6-EDE


“So hi there, you’re early! Do you know where you’re seated?” a steward asks as I step aboard. I reply that my seat 20K must be across the galley, and to the right. “Oh oh, I think we’ve got Mr. Smarty-pants here… he thinks he knows where to go, and doesn’t need our help!” the steward tells a female colleague in jest. I didn’t quite know what sort of welcome to expect on Emirates, but that certainly wasn’t it. Mr. Smarty-pants? Did I hear that right? Talk about risqué greetings in Business Class! I love it.

Heading down the aisle towards my seat, another flight attendant greets me with a chirpy “Good Morning!” Huh? “Ah good, you’re awake… I’m just testing the passengers,” he says. The good natured – almost too casual – banter is unexpected and so refreshingly unlike the more formal approach adopted by most other airlines in their premium classes that it immediately puts me in a strange but good mood. The style reminds me of the feeling one gets on a very good flight (yes, they do exist…    ) aboard a U.S. carrier, but it certainly wasn’t what I expected from Emirates.





What I did expect is what you see in these photos. There is no doubt about it: Emirates Business Class aboard the A380 is simply an amazing place. There are critics who will pooh-pooh the faux wood for cheapness or dismiss the shiny surfaces as nouveau riche – with some justification, I might add – but surely, no regular reader of this forum will get on this plane and not be amazed. That I can guarantee.

I had already read, and re-read, the series of excellent trip reports by a number of A.net members earlier, documenting in detail the Emirates A380 Business Class, but nothing beats seeing and experiencing it yourself. I thought I might keep the cabin pics to a minimum – you all know what it looks like, right? – but that proves impossible to do: I am on a photo-taking frenzy, and what you see here is just a very small portion of the total. So many apologies in advance for the indulgence, also for these poor quality pics in a weird yellowish light – I blame the mood lighting… hehe!







I find my window seat 20K easily: it’s the second last row (and last window row) in this vast main cabin that occupies the mid-section of the upper deck. I like the way the PTV (which is quite large enough) shows your seat number. The seats are staggered in such a way that everyone gets privacy and aisle access, which is a big plus point for many passengers. There have been complaints of the seat being on the narrow side but it’s a compromise I guess for the airline that’s also trying to provide for every J class passenger a flat bed, mini bar and large side table – which I find most useful of all.





There is already a blanket, pillow, noise-cancelling headphones, couple of soft drink cans, socks and eye-shades at/around each seat. Looking ahead of me, under the PTV is the almost invisible soft pouch that can be described as a seat pocket containing the usual magazines and stuff, and below that, a boxy space to extend your feet into when lying horizontal. The space does look a little ominously terminal from this angle though…  







Above are the entire contents of the literature pouch that include two in-flight magazines (Open Skies is the regular publication, Portfolio is for F & J passengers), a couple of shopping catalogs (no plane models for sale), and a thick, glossy guide to the wonders of entertainment system ICE.

The bells and whistles at and around this seat keep me well occupied as I push and pull everything in sight. Especially as other airlines cut frills everywhere, it’s truly fun to be in a place so rich in gadgets and so clearly decadent. Below you see the sturdy foldable meal tray that slides out from under the side table. Note also the narrow exit from this seat for the aisle – it could be a tad snug for some!







I try to get settled in, but end up as fidgety as a nervous tic. My seat’s not the problem: it is actually rather convivial and has a generous set of windows, but I am unable to sit still. Seeing me restless, lovely Mariana comes over to introduce herself, and agrees to call me by my first rather than last name, which is pretty cool. There are 25 cabin crew members aboard, but tonight’s light load won’t stretch them – and a nice contrast to the totally packed out flight coming over yesterday, she says, with a hint of a French accent.

After Mariana’s gone, I’m up on my walkabout with the camera again. My ceaseless photo-taking isn’t missed by the crew of course. On many airlines, nut jobs like me might get – at best – a reluctant nod, though often it is more like frowns, disapproving looks, or worse. But not on Emirates: photography seems to be positively encouraged. More than once, I am asked if I’d like my photo taken. Thinking I might be shy because I decline the offer, a stewardess says I’m bound to agree if she gets “a group of my colleagues to join you in the photo.” Mariana encourages me to visit the bar at the back of the cabin “you’d get great angles from there”; while another crew member (when I sort of complain, God forbid, about the strange yellowish hue from the mood lighting!) assures me that “we’ll make sure the lighting improves during the service.” White lie or not, I’ll have to say: Wow!





The passengers slowly trickle-in but in this configuration, it’s hard to tell which seats are occupied and which are not because the contraptions are so over-powering. As can be seen above, the aisle units allow much easier access than the window seats but according to seatexpert.com, the legroom here is some nine inches less generous than the window or middle seats (70 inches vs. 79 inches in flat bed mode).





The main J class cabin above seats 58 passengers, while the second cabin below is smaller (but not really cozier), accommodating only 18. The infamous in-flight bar and lounge is located just behind the second cabin as are all the 4 washrooms for Business Class – so it’s a trek down two-thirds of the upper deck length to the loo if you’re seated right at the front. There’s obviously also a lot more traffic and noise at the back end of the plane.





With a relatively light load tonight upstairs, boarding is handled so smoothly that I don’t even notice my fellow passengers getting on. I also don’t know how full (or empty) the cabins are downstairs and strangely feel no great compulsion to find out. In fact, for large parts of the flight, I am kept so contented that I even forget there’s a lower deck filled with dense 10-abreast seating – and I’m sure Emirates are happy to keep it that way.

From the PTV, I can see that we’re almost ready for departure as aerobridges disconnect from the mother ship. We push back in absolute silence a couple of minutes behind schedule, and with a distant purr of the GP7200s, we set course for Dubai with an anticipated flight time of 5 hours 30 minutes. This A380, A6-EDE, is the fifth and, at the time, newest whale-jet in the EK fleet. (The sixth registered A6-EDF has just been delivered this week, while the seventh is due before the end of the year.)





The safety video is long, lavishly produced and run in both Arabic and English. All the live announcements on this flight, however, are done in English only. As part of the spiel about what other languages are spoken by the crew, I hear about half a dozen European languages, Mandarin and Tagalog. But no Arabic and no Thai – very strange indeed for an Arab airline that’s flying between BKK and DXB!







The tail-mounted camera is a fantastic innovation that keeps you riveted right from push back to take off. The airport is not busy this hour for departures, so we pretty much taxi directly onto runway 19R (I think) and set off rapidly. The engines are quiet but they aren’t inaudible; still, I think the take off “sensation” is as much the product of my live video feed as the sound of the engines from outside.





As soon as the seat belt signs come off, Mariana comes round to take meal orders. Menus, which had been distributed earlier, show that dinner is the only meal being served on this sector. I, meanwhile, start to explore ICE which is an indescribably awesome system. To put it another way: there are more movies, TV programs, sports, music and games loaded on this flight than I can ever hope to watch, listen to and play in a decade. No wonder everyone raves about it.

Presented with such a bewildering choice, I am at a loss on where to start. Eventually I see a small plane icon that leads me to safe haven in Airshow, that’s easily still my favorite program aloft.





Service tonight starts with a selection of canapés and, for some reason, two drinks from the bar. The blood red glass on the left is ordered to salute my trip reporter friend living in the UAE, whose signature drink this is  Cheers!





We’ve now left Thai airspace and are climbing over Burma’s southern Tenasserim division with its long Andaman Sea coastline. Many Middle East- and Europe-bound flights from Bangkok head this way, overfly Tavoy on the coast, and then across the Bay of Bengal.





I really do like what’s showing on my PTV right now. It doesn’t matter if you aren’t sat in the cockpit or don’t have a window by your side… the Airshow channel aboard this A380 gives you the illusion you have both.







Back to reality, dinner for me starts with the Arabian mezze of tabouleh, stuffed vine leaves and hoummous. This is followed by a safe, but not particularly spectacular, Asian meal choice of beef in oyster sauce (one of 5 selections that include chicken paprika, curry shrimps, a pasta dish and grilled salmon salad).







The apple fritters in vanilla sauce – a bit on the dry side – is my dessert, followed by coffee and chocolates, after which I am stuffed and frankly, a little tired. It hadn’t been a bad meal at all, though I had somehow expected it to be better.





Service has nonetheless remained top notch throughout, with Mariana maintaining the difficult balance of staying friendly, unobtrusive and attentive with amazing ease. With dinner service completed, she brings an underlay for my seat that forms the mattress for my bed, and makes it super comfy even in the upright position. I think about spending a little time at the in-flight bar, but it is occupied tonight by a slightly loud group of passengers who obviously already know each other, so loitering there feels a tad awkward. We are still over the Bay of Bengal, the mood lighting turning a dim peachy pink, when I decide to turn in for the night. I am out like a light.







When I am next conscious, the Indian subcontinent is already behind us. I had been in a deep sleep for more than an hour and a half, but wake up suddenly feeling dehydrated, and finally finding some use for the “mini bar”. The drinks here may be lukewarm but is good enough if it saves you the hassle of calling for a flight attendant. I take a few gulps of water and soon fall back into slumber again. It is so easy when you have a fully flat bed.  







Birdsong. That’s what wakes me up next. Unless I am very much mistaken, there are birds chirping on this A380. The cabin appears to have brightened considerably into a new violet mood, but there is definitely intermittent chirping from invisible birds too. I am assuming that’s a gentle reminder that we’ll soon be starting our descent into Dubai. And not a sign that I’ve gone, well, cuckoo.





About half an hour to landing, we track the Omani coast heading towards the UAE. The seat belt signs have come on. I hear the noisy group of passengers in the bar – having stayed there for almost the entire flight – make their way back to their seats – in First Class. “Well, Business Class doesn’t look too bad…” one of them says as they pass my seat, en route to their luxurious accommodations up front. Such a shame they had chosen to hardly enjoy First Class at all, I think.





As we get closer to Dubai – the city’s lights shimmering in the distance – a passing stewardess reminds me to switch on the tail-mounted camera. “Make sure you have it on… it’s the best seat in the house,” she says. I am not about to disagree:







A smooth landing and a relatively short taxi puts us at the stand in new Terminal 3 – Emirates’ own – almost on the dot. Like in Bangkok, there are three aerobridges here at gate 231, one of which gets attached to the upper deck. It’s been a surprisingly good flight on Emirates – not that I was anticipating a bad one, but I was expecting the shiny hardware to outshine the in-flight service that – based on some reports I’d read – often needs more than a bit of polish. That didn’t happen. Instead, on this gadget-rich A380 flight, “service” was clearly up there vying for attention: the youngish crew displayed a friendly, refreshingly casual style of service I really enjoyed, while still maintaining an admirable level of professionalism. There’s no doubt the combination of top-class hardware with almost unbeatable in-flight service is a winning one – and I am impressed. But is this the real Emirates, or just a one-off? And surely the light loads have had something to do with it? I’m keen to put EK to the test again on my return flight. In the meantime though, this satisfied customer is off to explore EK’s home city.







Welcome to Dubai, which starts the moment you step into DXB Terminal 3. This is such a mesmerizingly glitzy place in the wee hours that I am disoriented. I wonder if this is not the Middle East at all but some ostentatious Vegas hotel, but later discover that it’s totally in character with this brash and bold city: this is the Dubai style.






planes, trains & the world’s tallest building


And what a city it is. Pick up any recent international news report and you’ll probably find it sprinkled with words like megaproject, speculators, excess, bubble, slump, debt, that tell the story of the rise and fall of Dubai. The great unknown beckons for this wonderfully, fantastically over-built metropolis but on the plus side, the city has never had as much publicity as right now, which will do wonders, I am sure, for the tourist trade. So, that’s what I will do here: give economics and politics a wide berth, and instead take you on a whirlwind tour along the new Dubai Metro before the flight back.





The Dubai Metro, a driverless, fully automated metro network, was declared operational in September. The new 52-km Red Line (with some stations still yet to open) runs pretty much from the airport to the Mall of the Emirates and Jebel Ali, via the old city in a generally east-west direction. For the most part, the train runs on elevated tracks, but goes underground around the creek and old city. Notice the vast amount of infrastructure construction still going on around it.





The metro route tracks in part the E11 Sheik Zayed Expressway that goes all the way to Abu Dhabi – less than an hour away from here at the speed the locals drive. Below is a partial view of expat enclave of East Jumeirah, with the rapid transit line and highway heading west from the city.





The elevated metro stations look pretty cool I think, a bit like docking stations on some sci-fi experiment. This is the Financial Centre station, a five minute walk from my hotel.







The interior of the Japanese-made trains are like those you find on most other metro systems. They are air-conditioned, practical and occasionally crowded. The key difference appears to be the existence of a premium “Gold” class compartment on the Dubai version – for those who prefer not to share the mass transit with the heaving masses. Wherever you’re seated though, the Metro has large clear windows and is a great new way to sightsee, which is what most of the “commuters” here appear to be doing.





Close to the western end of the metro line is The Mall of the Emirates (below), a massive shopping heaven that used to be the largest mall in the Middle East. In this land of superlatives, it has now been eclipsed by an even bigger Dubai Mall that breaks a series of other records as well. Still, this place is quite big enough for me and even houses a snowy slope to ski down, if you feel so inclined.





I know I said no economics earlier, but it can’t be ignored. Because all over Dubai, there is no escaping the sight of cranes and half-completed buildings or newly completed shiny towers without occupants. I remember vividly a visit 2 years ago when Dubai was booming and fast development all the rage, my taxi driver from Pakistan points at these projects and says rather perceptively: “there are buildings going up every day, but who is going to live in them?”





One of the highlights of a tour via metro is the view of Burj Dubai, the world’s tallest building, bar none, at 818 meters and 160-storeys. The super-tall structure looks pretty impressive actually. Construction started in September 2004 and on July 21, 2007 overtook Taipei 101 as the world’s tallest building. (It is still not the record holder because the building needs to be completed and occupied: that is slated for 2010.)





At the eastern end of the Red Line, there is an irresistible stop that must be made.  The metro runs alongside the building that housed the old Dubai Airport; while in the distance, the large new Terminal 1 and even newer and bigger Terminal 3 are clearly visible. But the buildings, separated by the control tower, are like terrestrial icebergs because a sizable part of the terminals are invisible – hidden underground, beneath the apron.







The metro station provides a direct connection to the airport via a futuristic looking metal tube. Terminal 3, opened in October 2008, is used exclusively by Emirates and, in true Dubai style, comes equipped with another superlative: this is the world’s largest single airport terminal by floor space.







This is the arrivals concourse and greeting hall at Terminal 3. The sheer scale of this multi-level, high-ceilinged building almost makes you forget the amazing fact that all of this is buried under the sands of Arabia. I start looking for a tarmac viewing gallery but silly me: there wouldn’t be one now, would there?

Equally impressive is the list of EK flight arrivals. World domination appears to be the objective with daily – or usually multiple daily – flights coming in from almost every destination across five continents. Yeah, I know we all know this, but seeing the destinations together on one board really drives home the point.







The only “viewing gallery” is one that overlooks the baggage reclaim. Huge expanses of glass allow greeters a rare glimpse into the cavernous baggage hall that passengers pass through coming into Dubai. Roman columns, shiny tiles, reflective glass and resembling the gambling lobby of a Las Vegas hotel, this is like no baggage reclaim I’d ever seen.

Some airports are super sensitive about what we can or cannot do in an area that also houses customs and immigration officials, so I am very surprised to see this level of openness. For a fleeting moment I wonder if photography is even allowed here, but judging from the lack of policing and signs, I don’t suppose it’s an issue.







The main departures area is equally spacious, though granted midday is a non-peak time for EK flights leaving DXB. There are wide aisles stretching so far down one can’t see the other end, along which are located row upon row of check-in desks – and all handling flights for only one mega global carrier.







Moving “deeper” into the terminal, as one must as a departing passenger, the vast distances even justify moving walkways. Here is the belly of the terminal, far from the main doors and with no natural light while, I imagine, wide-bodies taxi just above. Just like at arrivals, the departure screens show the prolific explosion of routes out of this airport. But EK code-shares are a rarity – the only one shown here is with PR to Manila.







Above are the regular check-in desks, with manageable queues this afternoon. The Middle East strikes me as a place where people-to-people relationships are paramount, so what EK is trying to do at the check-in desks is nothing short of revolutionary. There is more prolific use of technology at this end of the travel experience than I would imagine: all around this vast complex are signs encouraging the use of the self check-in machines.







And it’s definitely not a half-hearted attempt either. The self check-in counters seem to outnumber the manned counters. EK staffers are around to help passengers with the technology but they are surely being courted to try it out. And it does look like it’s catching on.





With that, the Dubai excursion via metro comes to an end. Hope you enjoyed the short detour. And I’m back where I start, at my hotel – the rather nice 321-room Dusit Dubai, where service is top notch and the architecture unique. I sleep quite well here too  








heading back


“Good morning Sir!” A car is at my hotel entrance at 6.10 a.m., three and a half hours before scheduled flight departure. I am headed back to Bangkok today. The airline had called up the evening before to reconfirm the time for the complimentary service and true enough, a “limousine” – more akin to a glorified taxi service from EK’s own ground fleet – is there waiting for me. DXB is one of the closest-to-city major airports – nay, it’s actually in the city – so I get there in no time at all. I am dropped off at the entrance to the First & Business Class check-in, a self-contained channel that runs parallel with the main departures area you’ve already seen.





Apart from shorter queues, the huge “premium” area looks little different from the main hall, and here too, I see many self check-in desks being promoted. Still, I prefer some human interaction and get it today in the form of an efficient but rather surly agent who tags my bag without a word or a smile.

A couple of moving walkways later and past dedicated immigration counters, I get into one of a set of interesting lifts that bring me back above ground to the departures concourse proper.







The lift deposits me here, not in “A World of Luxury” but smack bang into the middle of a busy shopping mall during the Sales: I can’t think of a place I would like to be less. There are just crowds of bleary-eyed people everywhere browsing aimlessly ahead of their next long flight – and a good opportunity for the airport operator to make a quick dirham from the unsuspecting Mancunian couple headed for Perth to visit their grandson, or the souvenir-hunting Chinese engineer en route home from an oil field in the Sudan. But not, I am quite certain, from the Malaysian plane nut travelling on the A380 to Bangkok.





I am not always a fan of airline premium lounges but today, I am glad to be heading upstairs and into the more exclusive enclave of Emirates’ Business Class Lounge. Not that it feels all that more exclusive, mind you. There are even queues getting into the main lounge area, and the crowds make the reception area look more like economy check-in than main premium lounge of a home carrier.





Still, I am “processed” quickly enough and let into the lounge proper. A long, long room: that’s the best way to describe this space that stretches along the upper level of almost half the length of the massive concourse. With the size of the crowds at reception, I am not surprised I can’t find a place to sit at the living room-style accommodations near the front. These may be different passengers from those downstairs, but everyone here appears to be equally jet-lagged and bleary-eyed while some are sprawled out snoring on the leather sofas. Better I move on deeper.







The next area I come across has chairs rather than leather sofas but this is full too, so I push on to the restaurant buffet section where breakfast is being served. The serving counters are long, self-service and hotel-like, dotted with the usual breads, cereals and juices as well as hot dishes like eggs plus Indian, Oriental and Middle Eastern choices. It is quite the impressive spread. The tables here are occupied too, so this nomad pushes on.







So how big is this place? I am almost certain this lounge (seats 1,500 according to an EK brochure) wins some kind of award for sheer size. But I doubt it will win any for ambience. By the time I get to this point (below), I had already passed two similar living room-style lounge areas, two buffet serving areas and accompanying restaurant catering to hundreds of people. Seating is opening up around here but I am now wandering out of curiosity rather than necessity and thinking: does this place have an end to it?







I have strayed far from the main entrance now. Finding a buffet counter just for kids (fancy that) with pop corn and hot dogs on offer before 7 a.m. is the clearest signal yet that I have come too far – or this place just too massive.

When I finally do decide to sit down, it is in one of the quieter – almost forgotten – seats along a corridor that overlooks the shopping mall in the level below. It is also here in what seems like a back alley of the lounge that other facilities like washrooms, showers, prayer rooms, business centers and children’s play area are to be found.







According to an EK brochure, the themes and styles change as you move through the lounge. Apparently, there are “fire”, “water”, “air” and “earth” themes but I really can’t work out which is which. All I do know is that through an ornate window that looks completely out of place, there’s yet another dining area that serves a decent Indian breakfast.





Wander long enough and you’ll spot things you missed the first time around. Like the hi-tech entertainment area called the E-Zone, close to the entrance, equipped with an impressive Xbox 360 racing simulator, a number of gaming stations and Microsoft Surface computers.







It must be said that most reviewers of this lounge don’t sing praises. On the contrary: they (many of them frequent fliers) complain loudly – about how crowded it is, or how noisy it is, or how confusing the layout is, or how lousy the food is, and about how offensive their fellow J class passengers who sleep on the sofas are. Now, there’s no doubt there are far more “exclusive” lounges elsewhere, but I (admittedly, not a frequent flier) prefer to see this place for what it represents. And I kinda like what I see.

The passenger mix, for instance, is the most diverse and cosmopolitan I have ever encountered. And the continuous stream of boarding calls for Tunis or Houston or Vienna or Wherever is not “noise” as much as evidence of this airline’s vast and ever-growing network. This is also one of the least elitist J class lounges I have been to – reflecting the revolution in fares EK has brought to the world, not just in steerage but up front too. Without EK, how many here would have had to go BA or SQ or AI or AF or JL? It’s not an exaggeration to say that every major (and not so major) airline is on the losing end of a competitive tug-of-war with Emirates. Little surprise then the venom spat out at this gulf carrier: a game changer is never liked.





It is 8.15 a.m. – about an hour and a half before scheduled departure – that EK372 to Bangkok is shown as boarding on the screens. Although I know it’s probably too early for boarding the premium cabins, I decide to leave the lounge for a wander round. Across the main Business lounge entrance is an almost identical, but quieter, one for First. The lounge can seat 800 pax according to EK and, with the place almost identical in size to the J lounge, it must be a lot more spacious in there.







The main boarding gates are down one level from here. But like in a parallel universe, this level of the terminal where the premium lounges are located also has departure gates and boarding access – but only for F & J passengers departing from the five A380-ready stands. Unlike downstairs, this place is pretty deserted. I see my Bangkok-bound A380 being readied outside but the view is mostly obscured by the shield to minimize the glare of a strong Arabian sun.







The notice at gate 231 says the flight’s boarding, but there aren’t any other passengers. The gate agent who has just turned up tells me to come back at about 9 a.m. when they start boarding Business Class. Right next door at 232 is another whalejet departing for Sydney and Auckland as EK412, also leaving soon, but the gate area is similarly devoid of passengers. I guess they’re still all in the lounges.





I do my usual walkabout. The picture below is taken from the upper premium level and overlooks the main departures area of this 26-gate Concourse 2. (Concourse 3 – that will eventually handle 18 A380s simultaneously! – is under construction and slated for a 2011 opening.) The lifts you see on the right link this concourse with the multi-basement floors that house the immigration, customs, baggage reclaim and check-in zones.





This is part of gate 231 and some of my Bangkok-bound fellow passengers as seen from the lower level. It seems as if boarding hasn’t begun for some of the economy passengers either. The empty upper level is the F & J boarding gate you saw above.





I slowly amble back upstairs. Shortly before 9 a.m., I am let into the boarding area which consists of seats for about a dozen passengers. With the A380 J class capacity for 76 passengers and 14 in F, seating is clearly inadequate, but I guess EK don’t intend to have their premium pax waiting around here for long.

In any case, I am one of only two passengers today. Can the loads be so light? I wonder. My fellow traveler is a nice chap, British businessman between flights, who has flown the A380 “oh, many times.” I tell a white lie to sheepishly explain away my photo taking and obvious childish excitement: it’s my first A380 flight, I say.   





A dedicated lift takes us down two levels to where an aerobridge connects to the upper deck of the plane. I see the plane that’s carrying me to Bangkok (A6-EDD, Emirates’ fourth whalejet delivered December 2008) clearly for the first time – actually, this is also the first time I am properly seeing an EK A380! And the novelty hasn’t worn off yet  Elder sister A6-EDB is operating the nonstop down to Sydney from next door.







I wish there could have been clearer shots of the plane as I get closer. Anti-glare has today become the anti-spotter too. Still, it doesn’t put a damper on my enthusiasm: I remain stuck at that phase of maturity where boarding an A380 continues to excite. Yes indeed, what a great beast!





My fellow passenger has gone on ahead, and there are no others following us from behind, so I am pretty much left all alone savoring the moment – as if the only passenger today – walking leisurely towards the giant plane. You can’t imagine how strange and wonderful that feels.







Dubai to Bangkok
Emirates Airline flight 372 in Business Class
Departs 10.18 am, Arrives 7.38 pm (same day, 38 minutes late)
A380-861 A6-EDD


Welcome aboard. What, no Mr. Smarty pants? Maybe I’d been half-expecting the type of greeting I got on the flight over, so when it didn’t happen, this passenger is a tiny bit disappointed. Damn those expectations. It must be said that the cabin crew on this flight are courteous enough, but the instant warmth dispensed by the mainly American and European crews on the BKK-DXB flight is clearly missing here. Today’s bunch, primarily Asian stewardesses in J, look guarded and distant. So much for stereotypes, eh?  





Still, it is nice to be back in this gadget-filled cabin again. And also to see it in natural light for a change; not some strange moody hue. As one of the first to board, I and my camera have full reign of the area without others clogging up the aisles. This, you may recall, is the large mid-section of the upper deck housing most of the Business Class seats – it’s about 40 minutes before scheduled departure and the cabin crew awaits more passengers.







I know all these seats are starting to look the same to you now. But just for the record, the photo above shows the last few rows of the main first J cabin, while the one below is of the smaller second cabin back aft. This is also where I choose to sit today.





My seat 23A is the front window of the second cabin – a “bulkhead” seat of sorts – but in this configuration it isn’t really that different from all the other window seats on this plane. The access to the seat may be a tad bit wider than the rest, but only just. A magazine rack is located just ahead.







Here are more shots of my seat showing the legroom and surrounding amenities. No more explanations are necessary I think, except to say that it’s convivial and private without feeling claustrophobic – easily my favorite configuration in J.







What’s a trip report without some knee-exposure? As you can see, there’s still plenty of space. Invisible in this photo is the shoe storage compartment located underneath the leg rest cushion. The seat is semi-leather and comfortable, but the wireless touch-screen seat controller (below left) appears to be inoperable and controls nothing today. Luckily there’s more than one way to access ICE.







Continues Below

[Edited 2009-12-20 06:25:50 by airpearl]

40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAirpearl From Malaysia, joined May 2001, 950 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 31361 times:

In the meantime, other J class passengers are starting to arrive. And contrary to my earlier wishful thinking, this is looking to be a pretty full flight. When asked, a passing stewardess tells me its chokablock in Y class, while “there are maybe one or two free seats” in J. The healthy load is not so great for me or the crew, but must be a slight relief for EK’s managers and bean counters who’re probably having sleepless nights over where else to send another 50-plus of these huge planes!





Knowing this is my last chance to grab some pics of the cabin, I try to snap what I can get like assorted cabin decorations (above) and one of the last row of the main J cabin just before these seats are occupied (below).





The best seats to take if you’re traveling as a couple are undoubtedly the twin unit in the middle. The way the side tables/mini bars are arranged to each side of the seats make the whole set-up a self-contained unit, and almost resemble the suites you find in First Class on some airlines.





The passengers around me take up their seats so noisily and with so much commotion that I now realize why the crew was so guarded in the first place: it is their dread and apprehension I am sensing. A contingent of rich gulf ladies together with a few male chaperons are sprinkled all around the cabin and are obviously not happy with the arrangement. Even without understanding Arabic, I can make out the body language of an empress dowager asking aloud why her son is seated in another section. Pulling a crew member aside, a younger woman asks for a seat change for her brother (or maybe lover, who knows?) – the fact that every seat in the back J cabin is already occupied is rather irrelevant, it seems. The stewardess is unfailingly courteous in her apology but ‘no’ is obviously an unacceptable answer for the young woman at 22D. She looks around fuming and dissatisfied.

I am sat across the aisle from where an active debate is underway between 22D and the empress dowager who make more than few furtive glances in my direction that I read as: “now, if only we can get rid of this guy… that’ll be the perfect seat.” I feign ignorance even though I’m mentally prepared to switch (if I get another window seat in return), but in the end, nobody approaches me.





The usual pre-departure drinks and towels come round when I notice we’re still at the gate 10 minutes past our scheduled departure time. Our South African captain welcomes us aboard over the PA but doesn’t mention the delay. Next door, a company A340-500 (A6-ERJ) has recently been towed into place to operate the nonstop service to Brisbane and onto Auckland as EK434.





A couple of minutes later, another announcement apologizes for the delay and asks for patience while a security check is carrier out. Apparently, some Sydney-bound passengers had managed to board the wrong A380! Eventually, more than half an hour late, we finally push back in the usual quiet manner and set off just ahead of the Sydney flight.







It’s less busy into the late morning at DXB. We taxi past A6-EDB and then a duo of slimmer distance runners in the team: the long-range A340-313X A6-ERN – a former Singapore Airlines machine – and the ultra long-range B777-21HLR A6-EWB. This is the first time I am seeing a B77L, I think.







It’s a short taxi to the runway and without any queues, we roll on and speed away, climbing gradually to our 39,000 ft cruising altitude. The engines are quiet, of course, but that’s such a given now nobody raves about it on A.net anymore. Our route takes us inland to fly over the north-eastern corner of the UAE before heading out over the mouth of the Straits of Hormuz and into the Gulf of Oman.







A friendly stewardess comes round to take lunch orders almost immediately we are off the ground. After I’ve ordered mine, the crew member proceeds to ask the same of Miss 22D. But she is clearly annoyed at the ‘intrusion’. “We just had something to eat in the lounge… and you’re asking us to eat again?” she says in a hostile tone. “I can’t understand what sort of operation you’re running here.” I don’t know if the stewardess was shocked but I was certainly taken aback. The stewardess explains politely that she needs to get the orders in but 22D is not having any of it. “I’m having my meal later… not now. You can come back later.” Having been told to leave, the stewardess starts to go but she is called back again: 22D has changed her mind, and finally decides to order lunch. As I eavesdrop into this strange conversation, I feel a renewed sense of respect for cabin crew who have to grit their teeth and endure this sort of rudeness on a regular basis. This passenger is obviously moneyed and more familiar with First Class where meals-on-demand are the norm – but it’s hardly license to behave so badly.  snooty 







The seat belt signs come off as we start leveling off, and time I’m off exploring too. The in-flight bar and lounge occupies the space between the second J cabin and the galley and toilet complex at the back of the upper deck. I want to get there before other passengers start filling the lounge and making photography difficult – but as you can see, I am already too late.





In fact, there’s a LOT of activity in this area long before I arrive. In many respects, it feels more like an extended galley with cabin crew rushing to prepare drink orders or set up meal trays or rearrange trolleys. I watch in fascination as all this happens around me, while an English lass, designated ‘bar tender’ flight attendant for this sector, is helped by others in setting up wine and liquor bottles and laying out the snacks – this seemingly simple “facility” does not only take up valuable real estate but is a lot more work than I imagined. She tells me that tending bar on the BKK run is easy, but “not on the London flight… that’s always extra busy!”





I often wonder what it must have been like in the early days of jumbo jets when Pan Am had a dining room, JAL a Japanese “garden” and many other airlines a cocktail lounge on the upper deck of their 747s. An extension of the days of ocean liners, the flying experience must have been a lot more civilized.

On today’s flight, I get a sense of what it might have been like. The existence of a large on-board bar changes the dynamics of flying somewhat: passengers (in J at least) are no longer strapped to their seats, but actually become social animals and explore. Particularly on a daytime service, they walk around a lot more and strike up conversations with strangers, take photographs, graze on canapés and order cocktails from a menu at the bar. For sure, the cabin crew has a tougher time, but the long-held paradigm that one stays put in 23A unless needing to use the loo doesn’t apply any more. And that’s quite an amazing thing.





There’s seating for only six passengers (or 8 at a squeeze) in two sets of sofas by the window, but there is a lot more standing room, which is what most passengers do. Apart from the impressive semi-circular bar, the other focal point – my favorite – is the huge flat screen permanently tuned to Airshow for most of the flight. Many passenger announcements are also made from here (you can see a stewardess doing that in the pic below) while lunch is being prepared just around the corner, so it feels a little like being in the middle of a reality show. By the way, Arabic is spoken on this flight.







You can quite comfortably spend the whole flight – chatting, drinking and snacking at the bar – without ever feeling the need to go back to your seat. There’s even a food menu here. But having already ordered lunch and seeing the meal service about to start, I do return. EK’s J cabin is brightly lit but back at my seat, I notice 22D and her friends are all horizontal and fast asleep already.





Back “home” at 23A, I am again tuned to Airshow which indicates we’re just off Muscat over the Gulf of Oman. The routing pretty much retraces the flight over here – an almost straight line across the India to BKK. There’s still a while to go, which is fine by me: I intend to savor this flight.







Perhaps because of the size of the cabin, lunch service is slow and elusive. It takes a while for the first course to reach me. Gwadar, Pakistan appears on my Airshow screen when my Arabic mezze of stuffed vine leaves, hommous and assorted cheese and greens arrives.







So which of those facts are accurate? The presence of glaring inaccuracies makes you question almost everything you see on the screen. Obviously just a quirk in the ICE system and, I am hoping, nothing to worry about. My main course arrives. I don’t recall why I chose the baked tilapia fish with wild rice – but it tastes pretty much as it sounds: like low-everything health food.







The dessert of blueberry crumble cake is quite tasty and together with coffee, rounds off lunch pretty nicely. Still, the “reporter” in this trip reporter is more intrigued by what is happening across the aisle. The news of the infamous earlier incident at 22D must have spread around the galley like wild fire because nobody wants, or dares, to wake the young woman up for lunch. A stewardess brings a tray to 22D, sees the deeply sleeping passenger, and very wisely goes away. I can’t imagine the horrors in store for someone who interrupts that sleep!  no  I wonder if it’s my imagination but the cabin crew seems far friendlier and more relaxed with most of the affluent gulf contingent asleep. Meanwhile, we have moved into Indian airspace just north of Mumbai.







I know how great ICE is and marvel at the countless movies on offer, but to spend this relatively short flight watching an inconsequential film feels almost a waste of time. I’d rather fire up my laptop, try (or at least pretend) to do some work, while enjoying the view. The monsoon obscures the whole of India, but that too is interesting with a strange calmness above the thick blanket of sometimes dark clouds. The in-seat massage does wonders for me, but not my productivity, as I nod off in front of the computer.







In the moments I am awake, I pull out the camera and experiment with different shots, but not too successfully I am ashamed to say. It is while doing weird stuff like this above that I am spotted by Michelle, one of the stewardesses serving me earlier, who stops by for a chat. It turns out we share the same hometown in Malaysia. She tells me that EK has dedicated A380 crews for each class of service, but I am surprised she’s not a big fan of the plane. “It’s not very service-friendly the way the galleys are positioned… it’s really a long walk from the galley at the back to the front of the Business cabin,” she says. Michelle says I “must” take pictures of the bar when it is lit up at night “the reflection over the glass counter top… that’s really nice.” She also encourages me to take a wander downstairs (oops, I’d almost forgotten there was economy!): “see what you think…”

I walk through the back galley and down the spiral staircase, unhook the rope at the bottom of the stairs and I’ve arrived deep in steerage’s belly.







And, oh dear, what an impression. The sight of a blank wall with a huge ‘Emirates’ logo on it does nothing to endear EK’s A380 economy class to me. Having travelled on both SQ and QF in A380 Y class – where the spaciousness can truly be felt – this almost claustrophobic place is a disappointment. More than half of the middle back cabin is occupied by an enclosed crew rest (both SQ and QF have crew rests below the main cabin), leaving the row of threes on each side feeling a little like narrow tubes. Surely that’s not what flying the A380 is about? (Apparently the crew also doesn’t like these rest areas as they claim cabin noise easily penetrate the thin walls.)





To be fair, the cabin ambience improves as I move further forward, and it does look similar to the other airlines in the front cabins. I am sure the entertainment and perhaps food compensates, or even puts EK at a slight advantage but I can’t shake off that Upstairs, Downstairs sensation that’s more prominent on EK than any other A380 operator to-date. In terms of space and hardware, it’s like a totally different universe upstairs.





Surprisingly though, what doesn’t change is the service. Standing just by the galleys for a while, I see the passenger requests coming in, while the crews dispense genuinely warm and friendly service, that I can only describe as impressive.

They are about to serve pre-landing beverages in Y, so I am kinda in the way, hovering with my camera around door 4L, obstructing trolleys and the like. On any other airline, this nuisance would at best be tolerated, or told politely to please return to his seat, so I’m actually preparing to leave. Instead, cheerful Irene and Alisha – the stewardesses I am obstructing – suddenly go into a “oh,oh, we have a paparazzi on board!” routine.

When I laugh, Irene says: “Hi, come here. Come say hello to Alisha… she’s from Malaysha… she used to work for AirAsha!” Now repeat after me: “Alisha from Malaysha, used to work for AirAsha!” And that’s how they move down the aisles with fun Irene chanting the tune that’s apparently well-known among the A380 crew. Alisha is blushing bright red (appropriate, I guess) by now but takes it in her stride, giggling along the way. What a fun working environment. (Alisha tells me later it’s true: she was with AirAsia before!)







En route back to my seat (and since I had the camera with me) I make the now almost standard toilet photo stop. Not a bad looking facility with a view.




We have another hour and a half to run for Bangkok. The sun’s slowly setting behind us but aboard EK372 at seat 22D, it’s still lunch time. I am back at my seat in time to witness the next episode of ‘The Difficult Passenger’ unfold. She is now awake from her long nap, but upset because a passing stewardess doesn’t know the lunch dish she ordered. “I gave it to you… just go and check,” she says. Two stewardesses (the additional one as reinforcement or witness, or both) return to say they’ve misplaced her selection, and can she tell them again what she wants: this sets 22D off on the ‘what type of operation do you run?’ rant. This goes on for a while, before she finally orders a main course salad. The salad arrives relatively quickly, is tried, then predictably rejected, and replaced with the chicken kebab with rice. By this time, none of the stewardesses previously serving 22D are to be seen – the steward delivering the kebab obviously drew the short straw.

Now, difficult passengers can be found everywhere and every day, and 22D may be an unpleasant but far from nastiest example. Seeing the situation unfold while I contemplate what to write in a trip report makes me appreciate, more than ever, the importance of perspective and attitude. I am certain that had 22D been writing this report, Emirates would have come across as an airline with lousy service and incompetent stewardesses who forget meal orders. And yet, from this observer’s viewpoint, the crew – polite, patient and courteous – performed admirably under very trying circumstances. It’s all about perspective.







We’re in the final half hour of the flight and retracing our route back over Tavoy in Burma into Thailand; the tropical night has descended rapidly. Michelle amazingly remembers our earlier conversation and comes back specially to ask if I would like to take a night shot of the lounge area, even offering to turn on the bar lights for me. How can I refuse? I rush aft as the seat belt signs come on and see a few die-hards and the bar tender still there (on her feet since Dubai) – though the shelves are empty with the drinks and snacks having been stored for landing.





It all happens quickly. I am introduced to my new friends – from South Africa, Scotland, Australia, if I recall correctly – am offered a glass of champagne which I gulp down because we are landing in a couple of minutes after all, a few apples and Godiva boxes thrown in “for effect” by Michelle and we have one of the most bizarre and memorable end-of-flight situations I have ever encountered.





last words


What else to say? Two flights on Emirates and despite different circumstances, both flights highly enjoyable with unbeatable hardware, and a fantastic crew that I would rank as among the best. Are two flights enough to form an opinion? Probably not. Could this be fluke? Maybe. But I am now more than willing to fly EK again on the basis of the service alone, and that’s something I never thought I’d say. This airline has truly impressed and surprised me.

Hope you enjoyed the read.

Regards,
airpearl





Previous A380 trip reports:

Qantas A380 Inaugural MEL-LAX-MEL (Oct 2008)
Singapore Airlines A380 SYD-SIN (Nov 2007)


User currently offlineEaa3 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1015 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 31087 times:

Great report. So basically you never have to meet any non- first or business class passengers in Dubai.

User currently offlineJayeshrulz From India, joined Apr 2007, 1028 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 30673 times:

AWESOME!!!!

I must say EK FA's are one of the best in the world.
Esp better than BA or AI or CX!!!!
EK rocks, and so does your trip report!!

btw, are you a non-rev pax?
tks for sharing!



JK



Keep flying, because the sky is no limit!
User currently offlineBurj From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 901 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 30642 times:

WOW! I really enjoyed your trip report...almost feels like I was there!

I love the pictures and the details...for those of use who may never fly to Dubai or on Emirates it was a real treat!

One question, so your flights were to the NEW airport but you took the metro and visited the OLD airport? If so, then Emirates is still using both airports?


User currently offlineAkhmad From Netherlands, joined Sep 2005, 2471 posts, RR: 53
Reply 5, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30474 times:

Wow Airpearl,

Truly amazing! I admire your endless efforts of capturing every single moment of your experiences! If one should ask, what you would expect on board of EK, I would refer your trip report.

Which type of camera were you using?

Quoting Airpearl (Reply 1):
Apparently, some Sydney-bound passengers had managed to board the wrong A380!

OMG, what if Emirates has all of the 45 A380's flying by the time!

Quoting Airpearl (Reply 1):
“now, if only we can get rid of this guy… that’ll be the perfect seat.”



Quoting Airpearl (Reply 1):
After I’ve ordered mine, the crew member proceeds to ask the same of Miss 22D. But she is clearly annoyed at the ‘intrusion’. “We just had something to eat in the lounge… and you’re asking us to eat again?” she says in a hostile tone. “I can’t understand what sort of operation you’re running here.” I don’t know if the stewardess was shocked but I was certainly taken aback. The stewardess explains politely that she needs to get the orders in but 22D is not having any of it. “I’m having my meal later… not now. You can come back later.” Having been told to leave, the stewardess starts to go but she is called back again: 22D has changed her mind, and finally decides to order lunch. As I eavesdrop into this strange conversation, I feel a renewed sense of respect for cabin crew who have to grit their teeth and endure this sort of rudeness on a regular basis. This passenger is obviously moneyed and more familiar with First Class where meals-on-demand are the norm – but it’s hardly license to behave so badly.

Disgusting!  yuck 

Thank you for sharing it. I have had a wonderful read during the cold snowy winter evening in Holland!

Cheers,
Suryo



Friends forever
User currently offlineEconojetter From Malaysia, joined May 2001, 430 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30472 times:

Bravo! This is by far the richest trip report you have produced. So much material, dripping with so much vivid detail, so decadent. Yet so well constructed that I, though not a fan of the type of excess that I have long associated with Emirates and Dubai, found myself falling a little for the airline. The charm of the cabin crew you encountered is undeniable.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
lying horizontal. The space does look a little ominously terminal from this angle though…

Oh my if it isn't the Airpearl trademark "coffin" view...  Wink

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
really do like what’s showing on my PTV right now. It doesn’t matter if you aren’t sat in the cockpit or don’t have a window by your side… the Airshow channel aboard this A380 gives you the illusion you have both.

Wow!

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
And it’s definitely not a half-hearted attempt either. The self check-in counters seem to outnumber the manned counters.

Unlike the elegantly named CUSS kiosks at KUL.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Now, there’s no doubt there are far more “exclusive” lounges elsewhere, but I (admittedly, not a frequent flier) prefer to see this place for what it represents. And I kinda like what I see.

Certainly not the cosiest, but it comes across pretty functional.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
What’s a trip report without some knee-exposure?

Oh... you say it best. Big grin

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
In the moments I am awake, I pull out the camera and experiment with different shots, but not too successfully I am ashamed to say

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s43/airpearl2007/AEK3081.jpg
But you are too modest. Slap on the Emirates logo and the airline's next print ad is good to go. You just need a tagline. I don't have any ideas at the moment; all I can think of when I see the photo is "sky juice." Hehe...

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s43/airpearl2007/AEK3094.jpg
I really dig how this photo captures the moment: the air of familiarity around a bar at closing time. Lights down low. Empty and half-empty glasses. People leaning in. Just talking and talking and maybe slurring a little.


User currently offlineRichcandy From UK - England, joined Aug 2001, 721 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30418 times:

Hi

Great trip report, lots of photos and details.

Thank you

Alex


User currently offlineMickster From Austria, joined Feb 2009, 174 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30313 times:
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That was one awesome report, I can't find enough words to praise you - you can win an award with that!
So, thanks to you, I am now contemplating once again to go to Dubai.


User currently offline9MMAR From Malaysia, joined Jul 2006, 2110 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30291 times:

You truly deserved the Oscar one reader awarded you in one of your previous trip report. What a composition, I am out of praises!

I have flown EK on 4 flights now, but I seem to agree with the majority that the software isn't in the 'World's Best Cabin Crews for 6 years in A Row Whatever' category. Could it be a different software is installed for the entirely new universe upfront/upstair? I guess I have to try it out myself, right?

I am yet to board the A380 - what a sad life I am having nowadays. Envied your newly acquinted British chap Mr. 'Oh Many Times' very much indeed. To think that he didn't even care to record the details in FlightMemory is even more annoying. Alas, he maybe a horse belongs to a different course. And I happened to tell the white lies like you did pretty often too nowadays, that I am a married guy with no children, of course to a different set of question. I guess some parts of my physics have shown its ageing effect.

Being the curious cat that I am, did your 'friend' in the UAE, whom you attibuted with the bloody red coloured drink, has anything to do with the selection of your Thai-inspired accommodation in Dubai?

I have a few more points to ask or comment but they were lost as I scrolled down the massively long write-up. Probably a second reply will emerge as I rediscover them, ok?

Anyhow, to the featured star of the (half of the) report - Miss Empress Dowager 22D - you are a PITA and this one is definitely going into the 'shrine' LOL.


User currently offlineCytz_pilot From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 569 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 30267 times:

Man oh man, if I ever save up enough change to buy a business-class ticket somewhere, I'm going on Emirates! Looks and sounds simply STUNNING!!! Big grin

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
‘what type of operation do you run?’

I pride myself on being pretty diplomatic but I don't know if I could bite my lip with that person. What a [colorful adjective]! The way you write makes it clear that you're the complete opposite of that and, unlike her, you got the most out of the experience. Karma baby, karma!

Thanks so much for sharing your trip.


User currently offlineEkA380 From Egypt, joined Aug 2008, 120 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 30159 times:

OMG, are there words to express the beauty and precision of your trip report : my answer is no there isn't. Everything is so perfectly in place and in order( I am talking about your tr) and truly reading it is an experience that is more enjoyable than the flight itself.
Emirates is also truly a love or hate airline , or maybe respect which I do.
EK's crew are certainly refreshing , but sadly some people get offended by their attitude ....
Moreover your pictures are amazingly crisp and plentiful which is a good thing.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
: sooner or later, every one of us will have been aboard an Emirates A380

 Silly

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
All the live announcements on this flight, however, are done in English only

This is surprising as usually Emirates has along with English , Arabic announcements .Moreover when I went to BKK last year we had announcements in the 3 languages.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
The great unknown beckons for this wonderfully, fantastically over-built metropolis but on the plus side, the city has never had as much publicity as right now, which will do wonders, I am sure, for the tourist trade

Very true , your observations on Dubai seem to go parallel with mine .

Again and again thank you for the amazingly portrayed Trip Report of the such a controversial airline.
PS: I hope I experience Hard and software surprises on my MS flight to ALY on Friday. Btw hope you have a happy new year with even more tr's.
Regards,
Islam



Always go the extra mile , its worth it ;)
User currently offlineAnshuk From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2009, 485 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (4 years 9 months 2 days ago) and read 29883 times:

Wow. Such a good read! Seriously, this kept me very well entertained for the last half [or was it one? :P ] hour or so!  Smile so much content, so much detail. Brilliantly done, Airpearl! Thank you SO much for this wonderful experience. I particularly loved your tour of the airport. Global dominance truly seems to be EK's only goal. But they do have a good J product.

Again, thank you so much!  Smile

Cheers,

Anshuk!  Smile


User currently offlineBA319-131 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 8541 posts, RR: 54
Reply 13, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 29842 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Hi Airpearl.

Really enjoyed your report and pictures, reminds me of my one and only EK Trip, the 380 Inagural from DXB to JFK  Smile

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Talk about risqué greetings in Business Class! I love it.

- Hmm, must be getting old, I don't find that impressive or funny.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
My seat 23A is the front window of the second cabin

- I've sat there but on EDA, great seat - IMO!

Cheers

Mark



111,732,3,4,5,7,8,BBJ,741,742,743,744,752,762,763,764,772,77L,773,77W,L15,D10,30,40,AB3,AB6,A312.313,319,320,321,332,333
User currently offlineJetBlast From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 1231 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 29807 times:

I think this report garners an A.net Fantastic TR award. Extremely well-done and beautifully presented!


Speedbird Concorde One
User currently offlineMH017 From Netherlands, joined Apr 2005, 1690 posts, RR: 30
Reply 15, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 29789 times:

Absolutely stunning pictures and well written text: very enjoyable to read...

I've been a long-time supporter of the airline operating to the West of DXB (for reasons of having had a horrible flight with EK before), but I've to admit EK's Lounge offerings and Business-Class is one of the best in the world (thanks to your report)...

Keep-on sharing, please !!!



don't throw away tomorrow !
User currently offlineT8KE0FF From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 418 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 29758 times:

What a fantastic TR!! I loved every word of it.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Birdsong. That’s what wakes me up next. Unless I am very much mistaken, there are birds chirping on this A380. The cabin appears to have brightened considerably into a new violet mood, but there is definitely intermittent chirping from invisible birds too. I am assuming that’s a gentle reminder that we’ll soon be starting our descent into Dubai. And not a sign that I’ve gone, well, cuckoo.

I thought this was weird too when I was on board, at first I thought I was crazy until my mom realized it too.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
The lift deposits me here, not in “A World of Luxury” but smack bang into the middle of a busy shopping mall during the Sales: I can’t think of a place I would like to be less. There are just crowds of bleary-eyed people everywhere browsing aimlessly ahead of their next long flight – and a good opportunity for the airport operator to make a quick dirham from the unsuspecting Mancunian couple headed for Perth to visit their grandson, or the souvenir-hunting Chinese engineer en route home from an oil field in the Sudan. But not, I am quite certain, from the Malaysian plane nut travelling on the A380 to Bangkok.

I really do NOT like the new T3. There are no where near enough toilets for the traffic they have through there, its crowded and its such a dull place.



RJ85 E145 E195 A319 A320 A330 A340 A380 B737 B747 B757 B767 B777 B787 DH4
User currently offlineAirpearl From Malaysia, joined May 2001, 950 posts, RR: 26
Reply 17, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 29222 times:

Hey guys, thanks for the comments and taking the time to read this. Many thanks too for your kind words. I did this report in parts and knew it'd be a "bit" long but didn't realize it was such a monstrosity until I finished and loaded! Apologies there.

Quoting Eaa3 (Reply 2):
So basically you never have to meet any non- first or business class passengers in Dubai.

Never thought of it that way Eaa3, but yes, almost... the lifts get you to the main departures concourse though - so there's still a little need to rub shoulders with the proletariat.

Quoting Jayeshrulz (Reply 3):
btw, are you a non-rev pax?

No, but I do envy them so! Thanks for comments Jayeshurlz.

Quoting Burj (Reply 4):
One question, so your flights were to the NEW airport but you took the metro and visited the OLD airport? If so, then Emirates is still using both airports?

Burj, I realize I may have given the wrong impression. I was visiting the new airport but the old one was just in the foreground - I am not sure what they use it for now. Emirates use Terminal 3 of the new airport, but some flights utilize Terminal 1 gates too.

Quoting Akhmad (Reply 5):
Which type of camera were you using?

Hi Suryo, I had two cameras with me; one was a point and shoot Canon Ixus for the discreet moments, and my starting to look a bit tired Nikon D80 with a Tokina SD 12-24mm F4 lense.

Quoting Akhmad (Reply 5):
during the cold snowy winter evening in Holland!

Keep warm! I am headed for Europe soon, so I'm not sure whether that's a great thing to hear... flight delays I fear.

Quoting Econojetter (Reply 6):
Oh my if it isn't the Airpearl trademark "coffin" view...

You just do it once and it becomes 'trademark'?... hahaha

Quoting Econojetter (Reply 6):
talking and talking and maybe slurring a little.

Yeah, that convivial bar feel - never thought I'd see it on a plane. Thanks for the comments Econojetter.

Quoting Eaa3 (Reply 2):
Great trip report



Quoting Mickster (Reply 8):
That was one awesome report



Quoting JetBlast (Reply 14):
Extremely well-done and beautifully presented!

Thanks so much guys.

Quoting 9MMAR (Reply 9):
Could it be a different software is installed for the entirely new universe upfront/upstair? I guess I have to try it out myself, right?

Hi 9MMAR, thanks for your kind words. Yes you should try it out - it's easy enough where you're based, no?

Quoting 9MMAR (Reply 9):
Being the curious cat that I am, did your 'friend' in the UAE, whom you attibuted with the bloody red coloured drink, has anything to do with the selection of your Thai-inspired accommodation in Dubai?

No, there were quite a number of hotel accommodation offers going in DXB - Dusit was having a great deal on at the time.

Quoting Cytz_pilot (Reply 10):
you got the most out of the experience. Karma baby, karma

Hi Cytz_pilot, you're probably right there .. haha. Rich she may be, but 22D seemed so miserable, and intent on making everyone else feel the same.

Quoting EkA380 (Reply 11):
This is surprising as usually Emirates has along with English , Arabic announcements .Moreover when I went to BKK last year we had announcements in the 3 languages.

Hi Islam, this was strange. I thought they'd have Arabic at least. Maybe the fact that Eid was the following day had something to do with it? All the Arabic speakers may have taken leave.

Quoting EkA380 (Reply 11):
hope you have a happy new year with even more tr's.

And to you too!

Quoting Anshuk (Reply 12):
Global dominance truly seems to be EK's only goal.

Thanks Anshuk for your comments. It's a bit scary, huh?

Quoting BA319-131 (Reply 13):
reminds me of my one and only EK Trip, the 380 Inagural from DXB to JFK

Hey Mark... the first EK A380 TR was a point of reference for me!

Quoting BA319-131 (Reply 13):
I've sat there but on EDA, great seat

I agree  Smile

Quoting MH017 (Reply 15):
I've to admit EK's Lounge offerings and Business-Class is one of the best in the world (thanks to your report)

Hi MH017, the A380 is impressive. But I would think twice before flying J class on some of their other planes - they seem to have so many versions.

Quoting T8KE0FF (Reply 16):
I really do NOT like the new T3. There are no where near enough toilets for the traffic they have through there, its crowded and its such a dull place.

T8KE0FF, yeah, most of the main concourse of T3 didn't impress me either. I expected better. The baggage hall is pretty nice though.


User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4755 posts, RR: 26
Reply 18, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 29215 times:

Excellent photos! You know when a cabin crew offers you photo taking opportunities, you should NEVER EVER refuse. How dare you... I would have been there in spirit to slap you across your face to wake up.

Hahahahaha... Well I also liked the non-aviation related pics you took of Dubai. I have always wanted to visit but something is holding me back. I am curious about the allure of that emirate, but at the same time, do i really need to be visiting another gleaming, modern metropolis? I am more inclined to revel in some dirt and grime.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Surprisingly though, what doesn’t change is the service. Standing just by the galleys for a while, I see the passenger requests coming in, while the crews dispense genuinely warm and friendly service, that I can only describe as impressive.

You are lucky then... EK's new service protocols emphasised a lot on the A380 crew before trickling down to the rest of the fleet. My expereince with them (on the 777) was a mixed bag of nuts having BOTH the cold and warm front lambasting my way.

Nice TR to end the year!

Hope to meet up with you sooner than later.

Ryan



Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineNZ107 From New Zealand, joined Jul 2005, 6429 posts, RR: 38
Reply 19, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 29132 times:

Hi Airpearl,

Fantastic and extremely well written TR. Thanks for sharing what seems like a great experience! Pictures were excellent as well.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
A series of polite apologies breaks out among all of us when the agent appears, and I am promptly let into the lounge as its only guest. A few moments later, the Business Class boarding pass for my DXB flight is handed to me – rather too efficiently I feel – and I am sat here wondering what to do for the next six hours…

That must feel awesome having the entire lounge to yourself.. The offerings looked great.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
What I did expect is what you see in these photos. There is no doubt about it: Emirates Business Class aboard the A380 is simply an amazing place. There are critics who will pooh-pooh the faux wood for cheapness or dismiss the shiny surfaces as nouveau riche – with some justification, I might add – but surely, no regular reader of this forum will get on this plane and not be amazed. That I can guarantee.

I had already read, and re-read, the series of excellent trip reports by a number of A.net members earlier, documenting in detail the Emirates A380 Business Class, but nothing beats seeing and experiencing it yourself. I thought I might keep the cabin pics to a minimum – you all know what it looks like, right? – but that proves impossible to do: I am on a photo-taking frenzy, and what you see here is just a very small portion of the total.

Indeed. I certainly wouldn't be able to stop taking photos.. And I'll eventually get to the upper deck!

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
The space does look a little ominously terminal from this angle though…

Very interesting angle though, I must say. One that would seem to be overlooked by many but in itself is very detailed and revealing!

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
a couple of shopping catalogs (no plane models for sale),

Are you sure..?

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
My ceaseless photo-taking isn’t missed by the crew of course. On many airlines, nut jobs like me might get – at best – a reluctant nod, though often it is more like frowns, disapproving looks, or worse. But not on Emirates: photography seems to be positively encouraged. More than once, I am asked if I’d like my photo taken

Exactly what I experienced on my first flight on the A380. I was really surprised that on embarking the plane, the FAs all said "take as many photos as you like". It's certainly a great chance for EK to get free advertising and to show others what it is like onboard. I guess other airlines are too protective.. But I don't see why they would be protective as not many cabins top the EK one.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Birdsong. That’s what wakes me up next. Unless I am very much mistaken, there are birds chirping on this A380. The cabin appears to have brightened considerably into a new violet mood, but there is definitely intermittent chirping from invisible birds too. I am assuming that’s a gentle reminder that we’ll soon be starting our descent into Dubai. And not a sign that I’ve gone, well, cuckoo.

Haha, it'd be nice to experience this too.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Finding a buffet counter just for kids

I can't believe that! This place does sound huge. If you start talking about a separate area for kids food, it seems nearly over the top.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
And the novelty hasn’t worn off yet Elder sister A6-EDB is operating the nonstop down to Sydney from next door.

The novelty won't wear off especially if I were to fly in J!

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
And, oh dear, what an impression. The sight of a blank wall with a huge ‘Emirates’ logo on it does nothing to endear EK’s A380 economy class to me. Having travelled on both SQ and QF in A380 Y class – where the spaciousness can truly be felt – this almost claustrophobic place is a disappointment. More than half of the middle back cabin is occupied by an enclosed crew rest (both SQ and QF have crew rests below the main cabin), leaving the row of threes on each side feeling a little like narrow tubes. Surely that’s not what flying the A380 is about? (Apparently the crew also doesn’t like these rest areas as they claim cabin noise easily penetrate the thin walls.)

My thoughts exactly after I had decided to sit down that end and was ready to go in my seat. I took advice from another A.Netter who said it was a really nice cabin back there! Maybe if it's not full.. It certainly didn't feel that great. I'll eventually get to this TR.. I bet it is noisy for the cabin crew too.

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Seeing the situation unfold while I contemplate what to write in a trip report makes me appreciate, more than ever, the importance of perspective and attitude. I am certain that had 22D been writing this report, Emirates would have come across as an airline with lousy service and incompetent stewardesses who forget meal orders. And yet, from this observer’s viewpoint, the crew – polite, patient and courteous – performed admirably under very trying circumstances. It’s all about perspective.

Glad it didn't seem to affect the service you received onboard!

Quoting Airpearl (Thread starter):
Michelle amazingly remembers our earlier conversation and comes back specially to ask if I would like to take a night shot of the lounge area, even offering to turn on the bar lights for me

That's wonderful. I really need to give this upper deck a go. I have a feeling it should be soon as I've continuously made my way to the back of the plane on my 3 EK A380 flights!


Thanks again for this superb report, very much enjoyed.

Regards,
Nicholas



It's all about the destination AND the journey.
User currently offlineCaleb1 From United States of America, joined Nov 2008, 364 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 29050 times:
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Roni would be VERY proud of this report. Excellent on all levels!!!!

User currently offlineSQ772 From Singapore, joined Nov 2001, 1792 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 28617 times:

Thanks for the amazing TR....one of the longest TR I've come across too! I started reading it at about 11.30am, went for a nice leisurely lunch, got back, signed off on some proposals in between your EK lounge trek and Passenger 22D, and only just finished reading the rest of this report! ... yes it's a slow day in the office.

Your flights are one of the very few on A.net that sings praises about EK's service. Most people pick on EK the same way they do with SQ. I guess to them, it's almost 'cool' to be able to spot the kinks in an otherwise world class product. You are right, it's all about perspective, and it's truly heartening to see how the crew have gone beyond expectations on both your flights.

I've only flown EK twice, both short haul. That was more than 6 years ago, and I still recall writing something here on A.net about how they managed to put SQ to shame on that short hop across the gulf.

As for passenger 22D, well, would she have reacted differently if she was served by a steward instead? Or is it a requirement that all Arab women should always be served by stewardesses? I've dealt with a good number of female Arab passengers in my previous job, and they usually appear shy, subdued when I talk to them... however, once I hand them over to my female colleagues, they immediately turn into your so-called Empress Dowagers...



There's always a better way to fly...
User currently offlineAkhmad From Netherlands, joined Sep 2005, 2471 posts, RR: 53
Reply 22, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 28617 times:



Quoting Airpearl (Reply 17):
Hi Suryo, I had two cameras with me; one was a point and shoot Canon Ixus for the discreet moments

That's so funny. My partner and I have got each of us Canon Ixus as well.

Quoting Airpearl (Reply 17):
Keep warm! I am headed for Europe soon, so I'm not sure whether that's a great thing to hear... flight delays I fear.

Where will you be arriving? AMS, DUS and BRU have been experiencing severe delays. However the intercontinental flights to and from AMS for instance have been less affected than the intra-European ones.

Cheers,
Suryo



Friends forever
User currently offlineSATexan From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 28497 times:

Fantastic! This is by far the best TR I have read on A.Net (or anywhere) till date.

User currently offlineAirpearl From Malaysia, joined May 2001, 950 posts, RR: 26
Reply 24, posted (4 years 9 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 27955 times:

Hey guys, thanks for your nice words. Glad you enjoyed the report.

Quoting Ryanair!!! (Reply 18):
My expereince with them (on the 777) was a mixed bag of nuts having BOTH the cold and warm front lambasting my way.

And so I recall! I would think the mix of nationalities, cultures, plus "baggage" the crew bring with them from whichever airline they came from plays a big role. Still, I feel a distinct EK culture (informal friendly, a bit QF- or VS-like) seems to be developing if the 2 flights I was on are any indication.

Quoting Ryanair!!! (Reply 18):
Hope to meet up with you sooner than later.

The A.netters HUB of SE Asia? Of course... hehehe... next time I am in Singapore for more than 6 hours Ryan, I'll sure be in touch.

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 19):
I'll eventually get to the upper deck!

I hope you do Nicholas... you'll love it. It has to be tried at least once I think.

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 19):
Are you sure..?

Oh damn, you mean they do? I flipped through the magazines and didn't see them.

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 19):
Exactly what I experienced on my first flight on the A380. I was really surprised that on embarking the plane, the FAs all said "take as many photos as you like". It's certainly a great chance for EK to get free advertising and to show others what it is like onboard.

My thoughts precisely - but still, the fact that they actively promote photography onboard is new and refreshing to me.

Quoting NZ107 (Reply 19):
Maybe if it's not full.. It certainly didn't feel that great. I'll eventually get to this TR..

I'd been in similar sections aboard a 747 (on KLM) and not being able to see windows across on the other side made it feel extremely uncomfortable and claustrophobic - and usually I don't mind cozy spaces. Do write the TR please  Smile

Quoting SATexan (Reply 23):
Fantastic!



Quoting Caleb1 (Reply 20):
Excellent on all levels

Thanks guys.

Quoting SQ772 (Reply 21):
one of the longest TR I've come across

Hi SQ772, yeah sorry, I didn't mean it to be - but thinking about it again, entirely appropriate for Dubai and Emirates... haha

Quoting SQ772 (Reply 21):
As for passenger 22D, well, would she have reacted differently if she was served by a steward instead? Or is it a requirement that all Arab women should always be served by stewardesses? I've dealt with a good number of female Arab passengers in my previous job, and they usually appear shy, subdued when I talk to them... however, once I hand them over to my female colleagues, they immediately turn into your so-called Empress Dowagers...

I think 22D was served by the stewardesses because the crew complement for that section was entirely female. But you're right. Once the steward - who's Arabic speaking but generally helping at the bar on this flight - started serving her, the complaints disappeared.

Quoting Akhmad (Reply 22):
Where will you be arriving?

Yes, I'd been seeing it in the news... I'll be travelling thru CDG and LHR by the end of the week. Hope the weather improves by then.


25 NZ107 : I swear I saw it last time I checked.. However I didn't pick one of them up and didn't even bother flicking through it on the final flight. But on th
26 Flightsimboy : Awesome report. I have to read it again all over later. However I just wanted to point out, that I myself was all ooh and aahs while in Dubai last mon
27 Borax : Fantastic! Second to last is a very intimate photograph!
28 Ronerone : Congratulations on one one of the best trip reports on the forum! I am SO shrining this! Your TR, for the 1+ hour i spent on carefully reading it, mad
29 Bedo : This could be because on one of your trip reports in Bangkok you were at the Dusit Thani. I belive that you said that Dusit was one of your favorite
30 StarAlliance38 : Excellent Excellent Trip Report! The introduction was very thought-provoking and your opinions about your changing situations are interesting! It's go
31 Globetraveller : I rarely have time to read entire trip reports anymore, let alone comment on them. Still, this masterpiece definitely deserves a small comment. Thank
32 Haynflyer : Wow, The exterior shots of the DBX terminal reminded me so much of the BKK terminal. I wonder if they were designed by the same architect? The way the
33 Nethkt : This is just a perfect trip report. I really appreciate your work here I definitely want to fly Emirates A380 soon. They are doing promotion on BKK-DX
34 DavidYYC : Amazing. Damn! You beat me to it! I have a very similar trip to write a report on YYZ-DXB return. Had I not been so lazy and tardy, I would got it in
35 Tk747 : Thankyou for your effort in writing this trip report, one of the best reports i've ever read .
36 PlunaCRJ : Congratulations on this TR! It was really a pleasure to read. The bad thing about it is that I am now feeling an irresistible urge to go to DXB via EK
37 Airpearl : Hey guys, thanks again for the too kind words. It's a bloody long report so if you managed to read it thru' to the end, you too deserve some sort of a
38 PlaneHunter : Hi Airpearl, another excellent report with countless amazing pictures! Good to see you enjoyed flying Emirates. Yes! How on earth is that possible? Pr
39 Airpearl : Hi PH, thanks for the comments. Glad you enjoyed the pics. You know all these A380s... they all look the same Seriously though, that's quite the secur
40 Ojas : Hi airpearl, Fantastic TR once again! How true. I was so disappointed with Suvarnabhoomi, totally opposite of what I was expecting from a terminal bui
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