Sponsor Message:
Aviation Trip Reports Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Pilot Report - "Bush Flying" 1 Of 2 (pics)  
User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 15826 times:

Note: I decided to split this report in half, so I don’t make it too long (it is already). I’ve only included my outbound flights. The next report (which I hope you will read) will cover the return flights. Happy Reading… Vio

Hello fellow a.netters,

I wanted to write a report about one of the most memorable trips of my life. So what’s so different about this trip? Well, for starters, I was the pilot in command. No, I’m not flying a 747 to some exotic destination, but rather my “300 nautical miles trip”
I’m not sure how it’s like in other countries, but in Canada, in order to receive a Commercial Pilot License, one of the requirements is that you must complete this trip, which basically requires you to fly at least 300nm radius from your home base. Also, there must be two intermediary stops before you reach your final destination.

I’m currently working on my CPL, at a local school in Calgary, Alberta. The school is actually located at Calgary International Airport (YYC). I’ve started here with my private and I’m hoping to become a flight instructor there and eventually an airline pilot. For now though, I will just concentrate on one step at a time.

The original plan was to fly with my friend (also my instructor) and my colleague from work from Calgary to Las Vegas, but that didn’t materialize, due to unavailability of some and also more importantly lack of funds on my part. As I’m sure you all know, flight training isn’t exactly cheap these days. Having traveled through Canada (East to West), I decided that I should probably explore Northern Alberta/BC. There’s a good chance I may end up working “the bush” so I might as well see how it’s like to fly up there. I’ve planned out my route as follows:

Leg #1 Calgary International (CYYC) – Edmonton City Centre (CYXD)
Leg #2* Edmonton City Centre (CYXD) – Slave Lake, Alberta (CYZH)
Leg #3 Slave Lake, Alberta (CYZH) – Peace River, Alberta (CYPE)
Leg #4 Peace River, Alberta (CYPE) – Fort St. John, BC (CYXJ)
Leg #5 Fort St. John, BC (CYXJ) – Grand Prairie, Alberta (CYQU)
Leg #6 Grand Prairie, Alberta (CYQU) – Edmonton City Centre (CYXD)
Leg #7 Edmonton City Centre (CYXD) – Calgary International (CYYC)

* Leg #2 CYXD – CYZH was not originally planned. Instead it was supposed to be direct to CYPE, but due to thunderstorms, we ended up going there.



Trip Durations: 3 DAYS
Aircraft: Diamond Star (DA40)
Reg: C-FNAC
Pilot: Vio** (a.k.a. Foreigner / fresh of the boater / 3rd World )
Passenger: Trevor (a.k.a. The Dutch Elvis)

**I’d also like to mention the fact that my name is pronounced “Vee-OH” and NOT “Vaio” I am not a laptop. Thanks ?


I added a few outdated photos (the next 3 photos), to better show you "the office" of the DA40 & C-FNAC.
Regards,








Friday June 30th 2006 (day before departure)

Outdated photos to show you the DA-40 C-FNAC

I bought my maps and the new CFS (Canada Flight Supplement) and did some preliminary flight planning, Also I’ve packed my luggage and booked my hotel in Fort St. John. Originally, I was to arrive on Saturday evening in YXJ and stay there for 2 nights, so for $119/night, I booked it at Quality Inn. Thank God for the internet. It can all be done so quickly.

Saturday July 1st 2006 (Canada Day)

My plan was to get to the airport at 8am, and be up in the air by 10. Because I didn’t end up going to bed until midnight, I decided to sleep in. Being rested was more important than leaving early.

Next morning, it didn’t take me long to drive to the airport, as I live fairly close to YYC (5 km). I fueled C-FNAC, did the walk-around, W&B, flight planning and all the other necessary paperwork.

I loaded everything in the airplane, did the pre-flight checks, got my ATIS info, Clearance and in no time, I was cleared for take-off from Runway 07 at 17:55(Z). I was turned Northbound, toward Airdrie, Ab, and at 4500, I was handed over to Calgary Terminal, who cleared me to 5500, then to 6500’.

After being cleared on route, I followed Highway 2 to Red-Deer flying East of it at all times, steering around the Innisfail airport (due to parachuting or sailing activity. I forgot which one). After passing the half way point (around Red Deer), the highway ended up East of my track and I kept my heading until I reached the point where I contacted Edmonton Terminal.

I was vectored East of the Edmonton International (CYEG). It was really cool to see, as it was my first time flying near it. I was advised of traffic in my vicinity, a Fokker 100 belonging to Canadian North, flying underneath me. It was quite a site to see. (I really wished I had my camera with me, but I was under the impression that I didn’t bring with me. It turned out that I did in fact have it and never found out until I arrived in Slave Lake.)

Edmonton Terminal handed me over to City Centre Tower, which guided me for a landing on runway 30, where I touched down at 19:05(Z).I taxied to the Esso FBO, where my friend Trevor was waiting for me.

The ESSO staff was very friendly and helping. I recommend that you go there, if you ever end up at YXD. While my aircraft was re-fueled and I went to check the weather updates and plan my next leg, to Peace River, Alberta (CYPE). I’ve called the “Weather Brief office in Edmonton (yes, I also have internet available, but it’s always nice to talk to someone about it). The problem that day, was that thunderstorms were building up around the Peace River area, with reports of TCUs and CBs in the vicinity. We opted instead to go to Slave Lake, as it was mostly clear, with a slight chance of rain-showers during the late afternoon; nothing I can’t handle. Also I called the Quality Inn hotel in Fort St. John to cancel my Saturday night booking.

After I’ve completed our Weight and Balance, secured our luggage (which also included a guitar), we hopped into FNAC and started on our next leg.

Leg #2 Edmonton City Centre (CYXD) – Slave Lake, Alberta (CYZH)

With wheels off from YXD’s runway 30 at 23:50(Z) , Tower directed me to 4000’, then handed me over to Edmonton Terminal, where I was cleared to 6500’, en-route to Slave Lake. We flew pretty much a direct route, flying near St. Alberta, Morinville, Westlock, etc. We averaged about 130 kts for our ground-speed. It’s really nice to have the Garmin 530/430 GPS system, though that sometimes makes you “cheat”. I still tried to use my “wiz-wheel”, that way I keep my skills sharp.

The scenery changed a lot from what I’m used to around Calgary. The land is mostly flat, but there are forests and rivers everywhere. It made me more aware that I’d have to really keep an eye out for potential landing spots in case of an engine failure. At some point, there were so many trees, that the best option was to try to land it along the river-bed. That was the only area which seemed to be clear of obstacles. We had flight following with Edmonton Centre for most of the way, but then radar services was terminated and we were again back to monitoring 126.7, the en-route frequency.

Luckily, there was no need for anything like that. As we got closer to Slave Lake we made radio contact with a helicopter flying at tree-top level, just to our right. He was doing surveillance for Alberta Forestry (that fact may need confirmation). At the same time, we switched to Slave Lake Traffic and a Cessna 206 C-FOOS, was in the right hand circuit for runway 28. He was doing a full stop, so further communication with him was not required. I just listened for his position reports to see when he was clear of the runway. By this time, I was a little ahead of the helicopter, but he was much lower than I was and was heading directly to his landing zone. I told him, I’ll make a west-bound turn and decent, then I will keep visual contact with him until he lands. Reason for this, is that I didn’t want to get into a dicey situation at a new airport, besides, the scenery was amazing. The town of Slave Lake is right on the shore of “Lesser Slave Lake”, and the aerial view is something out of a story-book, especially with the airport near the water. Actually, it’s so close that runway 28 ends in the lake, so one has to be careful. I personally wasn’t too concerned, considering it’s over 5000’ in length, but I can see how it can be a challenge for some of the water bombers stationed there.

From what the Cessna 206 pilot told me, runway 28 was active, with calm winds on the surface, but I still wanted to “check the sock” myself, so I crossed the mid-field at 1500’ AGL and confirmed that the wind was calm. I descended to 1000’ AGL and joined right downwind; then shortly after I touched down on Runway 28, at 01:00(Z). I should’ve mentioned, that a right-hand circuit is usually the case there, that way, you avoid flying over the town.

Once we were cleared of the active runway, we taxied to what seemed like “General Aircraft” Parking Area, where I shut down, secured the aircraft, closed my flight-plan and completed the required paper work. There didn’t seem to be anyone around, but one of the hangars had its doors open, so we had a quick chat with some really nice pilots/staff, which gave us info as to where to park our aircraft, how to get into town, etc. I also had my log-book stamped and signed, that way I had proof I’ve been there, should Transport Canada ever require it. We parked about 1/3 of the way from the threshold of runway 10. As we landed, on runway 28, we both saw the water bomber base, with its fleet Canadair CL-415 Tankers, so we walked over toward that side to take a closer look. We ended up seeing the pilot of the surveillance chopper, which was also doing some paperwork around it. We briefly talked to him and he expressed his interest on our little Diamond Star. After hanging around for a little longer at the airfield, we called a taxi and rode into town.

We were fortunate to find a hotel room here, because the town seemed to be quite busy with oil-rig workers and tourists for the Canada-Day long weekend. We had dinner at Boston-Pizza. I know, not too exciting, but decent food and atmosphere. Also it was across the street from our hotel, so that was quite convenient. There was a large group of young men and women in the bar area, which we later found out that were mostly pilots and nurses. Apparently, it’s quite common up North, where pilots end up dating nurses. I have to say, they (the ladies) were by far the hottest girls in town… and of course, why would they date the pilots?... I don’t think I have to answer that. Man, I can’t wait to go up North now… LOL.. Later we ended up going to a local bar, but didn’t stay too long. The next morning we had to wake up early and continue our trip…

Sunday July 2nd 2006

Early in the morning, I came to the realization that I had in fact brought my digital camera with me. I was quite disappointed that I’ve missed perhaps some amazing photo opportunities, but not all is lost. I still had a long trip ahead of me.

We packed up, checked out and left the hotel, taking a taxi to the airfield. We arrived there, did a quick review of our flight planning, called Edmonton FSS and filed our flight-plan to Peace River. The weather was beautiful. Warm, clear skies and calm winds. Our VFR flight-plan would take us over the south shore of Lesser Slave Lake, to its West End, then direct North-West to Peace River.

I took my time to enjoy the nice view at the airfield. The main “terminal” was closed, but we had access to it. I also decided to take a few shots of the surroundings.




The Notice sign on the door of the terminal. As you can imagine, I had no problem getting in there.


Our Diamond Star DA40 (C-FNAC) in front of the Slave Lake “Terminal” Notice how calm the wind was. Our luggage is ready to be loaded and secured for the next flight to Peace River, Alberta.


Slave Lake Airport, looking toward the West. Somewhere in the distance, runway 28 ends and Lesser Slave Lake (the body of water) begins.


Looking toward the East, you can see our DA40 being readied for our next flight. Also, local aircraft parked on the ramp. The one on the right is the 205 C-FOOS, which we head the pleasure talking to, a day earlier.


Cessna 206 (C-FOOS). We had the pleasure to talk to her pilot, just a day prior. He was in the circuit when we approached Slave Lake Airport.

After our run-up we taxied to Runway 28 and held short for a landing Cessna Caravan. All the big water bombers were ready to depart. Conair was there too and they were firing up their DC-6 (at least that’s what I think it was).

We took off Runway 28 at 16:30(Z) and headed West-bound along the lakeshore, climbing to 6500’ASL. After us, one bomber after the other was taking off, heading to various fire-fighting locations. A few of them passed underneath of us and I managed to snap a shot of one, with Lesser Slave Lake underneath us.


Conair DC6 Water Bomber passing underneath us, with the lake below.


Flying along the shoreline of Lesser Slave Lake, overlooking the right wing of the DA40


The Dutch Elvis (Trevor) and myself (wearing the blue/white stripe shirt). Check out the reflection on Trevor’s glasses.


Lesser Slave Lake from 6500’

We followed the shoreline of the lake, to its West end and enjoyed one of the most scenic flights I’ve had. The photos, taken with a cheap digital camera doesn’t do justice to what the real eye saw. Just before High Prairie, we turned toward the NW toward Peace River.


Looking Westbound, we’re getting close to the point where Smoky River (closer to us) with Peace River (further ahead) meet.


The town of Peace River is seen in the distance, as we approach the airport (CYPE) from the south.

I contacted Peace River radio and Runway 22 was favored at the time. We joined left base for 22.


Flying left base Rwy 22, just about to turn final. Peace River (both the town and the river) can be seen in the background.


Approach to RWY 22 at CYPE


Trevor was busy taking pictures, while I was flying the plane (as it should be). Here you can see the shadow of our Diamond Star and a heard of Buffalo.


Short final 22. Maybe a little low, but I touched down right on the numbers.


After touching down at 17:35(Z), we taxied passed the terminal building to the small Esso station.

We spent about 1.5 hours there, mostly chatting with other pilots, etc. Before we left, I called Edmonton FSS for weather updates. The weather rep. informed me that storms are building up North of our route, and we had about a 2 – 3 hour window, before we’d encounter some serious weather. At this point, we were ready to leave and the flight to CYXJ (Fort St John) wasn’t going to be a little more than one hour.


C-FNAC rests and cools down, while we hang around the ramp at CYPE (Peace River, Alberta)


A cool helicopter touches down just East of CYPEs ramp.

Once we completed all that had to be done before take-off, I lifted C-FNAC off Runway 04 at exactly 19:20(Z). We made a left turn, heading toward the West, on our way to Forst St. John, BC.


Take-off from runway 04 at CYPE. You can see the terminal building and the Esso Station (right of the terminal, just after the parked twin.)


Peace River Airport sean as we climb up to our cruising altitude.


Flying over Cardinal Lake, just West of CYPE. (View from the left side of the airplane)


Flying over Cardinal Lake, just West of CYPE. (View from the right side of the airplane)


The Peace River, between CYPE and CYXJ


Clouds start to built up as we make our way to Fort St. John

The flight to CYXJ (Fort St. John, BC) was quite bumpy, but that was to be expected considering the weather conditions. As I approached CYXJ, I contacted the airport radio frequency and Runway 20 was favored there. There was no traffic in the pattern at the time, so I made an uneventful landing at 20:30(Z)


Approaching runway 20 at CYXJ


Short final rwy 20 at CYXJ. The airport is now more visible, with the town seen in the background.


In the flare about to touch down on the numbers.


You can see the storm was building up, as we taxied to the ramp


Air Spray’s Water Bomber. Check out the clouds in the background.

After we shut down, we parked at the Shell, but there was nobody there, so we’ve called the ESSO station, and in no time, they brought a truck to us and fueled our plane. I wanted to do this right away, so I wouldn’t waste my time the next morning. With summer weather being what it is, I decided to fly mostly in the morning, and next day, I had to fly all the way to Calgary.


The ESSO truck is fueling C-FNAC at the Shell station (I know, strange). The terminal and control tower can be seen in the background


Air Spray, taxing by us while the DA40 was getting fuel.


Air Canada Jazz CRJ taxing by us after a flight from Vancouver (I’m guessing, someone please confirm). Both the pilots and most of the passengers waved at us, while we tried to look cool and important.


C-FNAC tied down and resting for the night. Some of our luggage is still seen beside the aircraft. Next morning, she’d fly all the way to Calgary.

After we tied down the aircraft (with rope that we had to purchase in Edmonton), we wondered around the terminal, looking for a car to rent. The prices were outrageous (around 50 dollars), with extra charge for each KM. We opted to take a taxi to the town (which is about 8 miles from the airport), however some nice Ramp Workers at AC Jazz, were just getting off their shift, so they offered to take us downtown. Canadians are so nice!

So, this was the half-point of this exciting trip. I hope you’ll read the next report, which is the return to Calgary, via Grand Prairie & Edmonton City Centre Airport. I have lots of photos on the return trip, so pleas come back to read it. I’ll probably get it done in about 2 days.

Please feel free to ask me any questions, as I know I’ve omitted a few things. Also, if I’ve made any errors, please feel free to correct me.


Vio Ludusan


Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline767747 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1916 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 15805 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Great report and pictures!

Quoting Vio (Thread starter):
Both the pilots and most of the passengers waved at us, while we tried to look cool and important.

That's funny! When I was working on my private pilot's license a few years ago and when I would fly to airports such as Islip, Long Island, Westchester County Airport in White Plains, NY, or Albany, I would always try to look important when big airline jets passed by.


User currently offlineJafa39 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 15784 times:

Quoting Vio (Thread starter):
while we tried to look cool and important.

Priceless!!!  Smile

Very good report, it really got me going, I must go to Canada sometime and hire a pilot to fly me around the place.

What are the winters like in this area? Looked nice and sunny in the pics.


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 15773 times:

Jafa39,

Thanks. You should really come to Canada. It's really nice. Flying up North is a totally new experience. Also, winters are quite cold, but summers are very nice. Anywhere between 22 - 30 Celsius. It was quite hot on this trip, hence all the thunderstorms.



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineCabso1 From Canada, joined May 2005, 502 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 15610 times:

Excellent report!!

Quoting Jafa39 (Reply 2):
Very good report, it really got me going, I must go to Canada sometime and hire a pilot to fly me around the place.

As Jafa39 said, your trip report makes me feel envious and makes me wanna fly right now.

How many hours have you clocked up? Can't wait for the second trip!


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 15589 times:

Thank you Cabso1,

I've logged about 11 hours this entire trip (including the return flight). That was on the hobs, not the actual "in the air" time.

My total hours now are around 140, so I'm getting close to my 150 mark, where I can do my Commercial Flight Test.



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineCabso1 From Canada, joined May 2005, 502 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 15455 times:

BTW Vio, do you own the DA40 or did you have it out on lease? If so, how much? (if you don't mind me asking)

User currently offlineCrjflyer35 From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 668 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 15437 times:

Awesome report! I just did my first solo, so this shows me what I have to look forward to in my training, Canada looks gorgeous!


crj



Ok, wait for the RJ to pass, cleared to push tail south Mike, and you're cleared to spin #2 in the push.
User currently offlineNZ747 From New Zealand, joined Dec 2004, 967 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 15428 times:

Nice report, and great pics!

Quoting Vio (Thread starter):
I’m not sure how it’s like in other countries, but in Canada, in order to receive a Commercial Pilot License, one of the requirements is that you must complete this trip, which basically requires you to fly at least 300nm radius from your home base. Also, there must be two intermediary stops before you reach your final destination.

Here in New Zealand we have the exact same requirement. I did my 300nm nav a month and a half ago.

Cheers,
NZ747


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15377 times:

Cabso1,

I'm afraid I don't actually own this aircraft. It's a little over my budget, but at least I get to fly it from time to time. I have to rent it and it's not the cheappest, but not too expensive either considering the performance you get from it.

Just some general info.

Price (in CDN dollars)
$134.00/hour (DRY) $164.00/ hour (WET, meaning with fuel)

Fuel consumption: 8.0 GPH - 10.00 GPH (on average)

GS: 125kts - 130 kts (on average)

These are not straight out of the POH, but just gives you a general idea. If you want exact numbers, I could look it up for you.

NZ747,

It seems like Canada/Australia/New Zealand are quite similar as far as requirements go. I'd love to come there one day and fly. I saw NZ is just stunning.



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineCabso1 From Canada, joined May 2005, 502 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15364 times:

Thanks Vio, for the figures. Must be an interesting bird to fly in!

User currently offlineBWI757 From Israel, joined Dec 2004, 429 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (8 years 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 15326 times:

Very nice to see something different in the trip reports!

BWI757



I live in the US but my heart is in Jerusalem!
User currently offlineMr AirNZ From New Zealand, joined Feb 2002, 851 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (8 years 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 15100 times:

Quoting NZ747 (Reply 8):
Here in New Zealand we have the exact same requirement. I did my 300nm nav a month and a half ago.

It's an ICAO requirement. All CPL applicants in ICAO states are required to complete this Cross Country.


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (8 years 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 14831 times:

Hi all,

Thanks for reading my posts everyone. I know I hinted that I'll do a part 2 of 2 for my return trip, but that hasn't happened due to certain events in Calgary. (*cough* Stampede *cough*)... enough said about that  Smile

I shall do one in the next few days.

Vio



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineGunsontheroof From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3502 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (8 years 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 14638 times:

Beautiful pictures. Looks like a lot of fun!


Next Flight: 9/17 BFI-BFI
User currently offlineBMIFlyer From UK - England, joined Feb 2004, 8810 posts, RR: 58
Reply 15, posted (8 years 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 14623 times:

Fantastic read, cheers Big grin

Looking forward to part 2 already  Wink


Lee



Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own
User currently offlineCOIAH756CA From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 506 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (7 years 12 months 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 14174 times:

Great pics and report. I also love that Diamond. If I had the cash, I would definitely get one.

I had cousins in Wisconsin back when I was a teen (60's).. One was 23 (pilot)and their family had a great new Baron. We would take it all over Manitoba when I visited. Canada is a great place. I thank them for hockey, my lifelong passion.



Long live Denver-STAPLETON. RIP the old and best KDEN
User currently offlineCptSpeaking From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 639 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (7 years 12 months 18 hours ago) and read 13880 times:

Quoting 767747 (Reply 1):
That's funny! When I was working on my private pilot's license a few years ago and when I would fly to airports such as Islip, Long Island, Westchester County Airport in White Plains, NY, or Albany, I would always try to look important when big airline jets passed by.

Ditto on that!! It's sweet when you pull up someplace and hop out looking all cool, especially in the DA40 with the canopy, right up until the point where some dude rolls up in a G-V and struts across the ramp in a suit. Then it sucks.  biggrin 

Quoting COIAH756CA (Reply 16):
I also love that Diamond.

Absolutely! They are soooo much fun to fly, especially with the G1000...it makes life so easy!

Quoting COIAH756CA (Reply 16):
I thank them for hockey, my lifelong passion.

Amen! Aviation and hockey, the perfect combination. GO CANES!! Stanley Cup CHAMPS!!!  Smile

Your CptSpeaking



...and don't call me Shirley!!
User currently offlineOutlier From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 12 months 17 hours ago) and read 13874 times:

You guys in over there in Canada sure have a funny definition of 'bush flying'
 Smile


Nice report.


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 13751 times:

Outlier,

That's why I've put "Bush flying" in quotation marks. (Sort of a "selling feature". You have 2 sec. to catch someone's eye. I didn't lie, did I?)

Yeah, it's "up North" from most major Canadian cities, hence most people think it's in the bush. Alaska/Yukon/North West Terr./Nunavut is a whole different ball game.

Thanks for the remark though.

Vio



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineOutlier From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 13560 times:

Quoting Vio (Reply 19):
That's why I've put "Bush flying" in quotation marks

Well I was hoping to challenge you a bit, and see if on your next trip you had floats on that Diamond!


User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1401 posts, RR: 10
Reply 21, posted (7 years 11 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 13128 times:

Hey all...

I know it has been a while since I promised Part 2 of 2... Well, here it is...

Enjoy....

Pilot Report - "Bush Flying" 2 Of 2 (LOTS Of PICS) (by Vio Sep 4 2006 in Trip Reports)

Vio



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Pilot Report - "Bush Flying" 1 Of 2 (pics)
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Trip reports only! Other topics here
  • If criticizing an airline, express yourself in a dignified manner.
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Pilot Report - "Bush Flying" 1 Of 2 (pics) posted Fri Jul 14 2006 00:27:21 by Vio
Pilot Report - G.A. (Calgary–Bragg Creek) 40+ Pics posted Thu Oct 12 2006 04:08:08 by Vio
Pilot Report LGW-FAO-LGW (no Pics) posted Sun Feb 12 2006 22:46:08 by ZB330
Fun And Frustration Of Flying Russia +pics posted Sun Mar 7 2004 09:08:03 by Aussie_
PHX-ATL-PHX On US (Tons Of Pics!) posted Mon Nov 13 2006 20:29:28 by Treebeard787
Pilot Report: Dog Fight W/ P-51 In A C152 posted Wed Nov 1 2006 22:08:45 by ZBBYLW
USA - Hungary/Germany DL/4U/LH Lots Of Pics posted Tue Oct 24 2006 08:57:00 by Phxtravelboy
Trip To Norway: SEA-ORD-EWR-OSL With Tons Of Pics! posted Fri Sep 29 2006 22:31:04 by Thepilot
New York City With BA (Lots Of Pics) Part 4 posted Sun Sep 24 2006 10:36:22 by BAW076
New York City With BA (Lots Of Pics) Part 3 posted Sun Sep 24 2006 10:25:01 by BAW076

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format