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Scandinavia Part 2: CPH-HEL On Finnair (pics)  
User currently offlineJsnww81 From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2037 posts, RR: 15
Posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 8215 times:

“Good morning, seven o’clock,” chirped the Danish-accented voice on my wake-up call. After two gloomy days in Copenhagen (read about my outbound trip here) it was time to pack up again for the next leg of my trip, to Helsinki. While I showered and dressed I watched the DR1, the Danish state television network, which hadn’t started showing normal programming yet – just a test pattern of bouncing marbles overlaid with voices chattering away in Danish, which is about as difficult a language as any I’ve ever heard. Nothing is pronounced the way it looks, whole syllables get dropped from words in conversation and sentences run together – a Swedish acquaintance described it to me as “sort of like Swedish, but it’s like they’re talking with their mouths full of potatoes.” Fortunately most Danes speak excellent English, so you don’t have to attempt to speak their language (and embarrass yourself in the process.)

I took the sparkling new Copenhagen Metro – arguably the most modern subway system I’ve ever seen – to Ørestad, where the Danes seem to building a huge new city in the middle of the Amager countryside. There were cranes everywhere, building apartment towers, office buildings and new streets. After a quick look at the massive Field’s shopping complex next to the station (it’s basically an American-style mall, sort of like the Trafford Centre or Bluewater in England) I headed back to the station, where I switched to a DSB regional train for the short hop over Tårnby to the airport.

**********************************************************

Copenhagen Kastrup Airport
Saturday, November 25, 2006


The train drops off at CPH’s Terminal 3, which primarily serves SAS and its partner airlines, so I had to walk back through a series of construction tunnels to Terminal 2. CPH is building a large centralized security checkpoint in between T2 and T3 (I’m not sure why, since queues never seemed bad on any of my visits to CPH.) Terminal 3 is very modern and very Scandinavian (lots of wood, glass and steel):


Terminal 2 is the oldest of Copenhagen’s three terminals, although you’d never guess it – like everything else in Denmark, it shines like brand new, and it’s sleek and modern and full of gorgeous people. It’s a very simple design, with a vast check-in hall and little round skylights to let the sun (a rare concept in Denmark) through. Here’s a look at the check-in hall:


The line for Finnair check-in was already quite long when I arrived, so I joined the much shorter queue for Finnair and oneworld elites. After dropping off my bag and getting a boarding pass, I headed upstairs to security, which is on the mezzanine overlooking the check-in facilities. It was possibly the most civilized security procedure I’ve ever seen… professional and thorough, conducted by pleasant officials instead of TSA agents barking out orders or monotonously repeating instructions.

Inside security the terminal is basically one long shopping center, punctuated by piers leading to each of the gates. There’s lots of skylights and wooden floors, and when combined with the holiday decorations it looked pretty good:


The shopping passage between Piers B and C:


CPH doesn’t have a formal observation deck, but views across the apron were pretty good from the windows lining the terminal. I couldn’t figure out any rhyme or reason to gate assignments, except that Pier C seemed to handle all intercontinental flights and all SAS Dash 800 flights left from bus gates underneath the main terminal. Is there a pattern to where flights are parked?

An Estonian Air 737 was resting at Pier A:
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r54/ccguy17/Second%20Flight/PICT0070.jpg

Two SAS Mad Dogs and a Sterling (former Maersk Air as evidenced by the light blue underbelly) 737 lined up on Pier B:


One of SAS’ MD87s on the opposite side of Pier B:


An SAS A340 and the SAS ‘retrojet’ A319 parked at Pier C, which predominantly handles intercontinental and non-Schengen movements (although my flight from Stockholm would arrive there a few days later):


The huge flight-status board outside security… as at many European airports, gate assignments aren’t posted until about half an hour before boarding, to keep passengers out of the piers and in the shopping areas. They do this at Heathrow and I normally hate it, since there are no views from any of the shopping centers, but at CPH I didn’t mind:


Eventually my Helsinki flight was posted at a gate on Pier A, so I headed down. Above the entrance to each pier is a sign reading “God resje – have a pleasant flight”, which I thought was a nice touch. Pier A is one of the airport’s original piers, although it was extensively rebuilt and renovated in the 1990s:


An Austrian Arrows Fokker 70 in the Star Alliance scheme and Norwegian.no 737 parked at one arm of Pier A:


One of SAS’ ubiquitous MD80s preparing to push back. SAS uses all three piers in the main building in addition to remote stands and gates at the very small domestic terminal. From what I could gather over the course of my travels, the SAS MD80 and A321 fleet are focused on Copenhagen, while the 737s are based at Stockholm and Oslo. I don’t think I saw any SAS 737s while I was in Copenhagen, but that was just my brief impression:


At the entrance to the gate holdroom our boarding passes were checked, so that when boarding began everyone just got up and went into the jetway. I’d never seen that done before but it seemed to work pretty well. Once you entered the holdroom, you had effectively boarded the aircraft and weren’t allowed to leave, so each holdroom had a small unisex bathroom.

CPH’s high landing fees have kept a lot of low-fare airlines out, so most of the holiday flights to Spain, Portugal, Greece and Italy are operated by more traditional “holiday’ carriers like Sterling and Novair. easyJet are one of the few exceptions – here’s an A320 pushing back for a flight to Luton:


Our Finnair A320 pulling into the gate:


**********************************************************

Finnair Flight AY699
Copenhagen Kastrup (CPH) – Helsinki Vantaa (HEL)
Departs CPH 10:40am, arrives HEL 1:15pm
Airbus A320, seat 16F
Flying time: 1 hour, 35 minutes


This was my first time flying Finnair and on first impression the aircraft was very nice, upholstered in Finnair’s customary dark blue and immaculately clean. The first five or six rows had been separated as business class, with the middle seats intentionally left empty (most European airlines do this on shorthaul flights rather than having a separate cabin as we do in the US.) I was sitting back in coach, but the seats were still quite comfortable and legroom was more than adequate. The flight was about 70 percent full, but the middle seat between me and the aisle remained empty.

As boarding wrapped up the cabin crew – two men and two women – came down the aisles passing out newspapers. In addition to the Finnish-language Helsingin Sanomat and the Danish Jyllands-Posten and Ekstra Bladet they also had the Financial Times in English. There may have been a Swedish newspaper in there as well, but I have a hard time telling Swedish from Danish.

While we loaded the last of our bags and prepared to push, the Austrian Arrows F70 started on its trip to Vienna:


Preparing to push back, with a Spanair 717 on stand next door:


It began to rain as we left the gate and the engines started, and as the drops streaked across the windshield it became impossible to take any more pictures. We crossed runway 12-30 and headed for the threshold of 22R, getting in line behind a Novair A330 and a Cimber Air ATR. As we taxied the LCD monitors dropped down and played the safety video, which played first in Finnish, then in Swedish (a minority language in Finland) and finally in very British-accented English. After the video, a nosewheel camera was switched on for takeoff.

As it was now raining harder, I chose not to attempt a takeoff video (my camera probably would have focused on the raindrops rather than the scenery outside.) We roared off to the southwest, passing the Amager suburbs adjacent to the airport:


Leaving the coast of Amager behind, about to be swallowed up by the clouds:


For several minutes we climbed through the clouds, getting thrown around a bit in the process, and then finally broke out into the sun, which I hadn’t seen for the last three days.

Once we leveled at cruising altitude the captain came overhead to welcome us aboard, repeating his message in Swedish and English. It was interesting to hear him switch seamlessly between all three languages – his English was only slightly accented. He said conditions in Helsinki were similar to Copenhagen – cloudy and foggy, with light rain. So much for a view of Finland during landing!

The LCD monitors remained down throughout the flight, showing an airshow map rather than any inflight programming. After turning over the Øresund, we then flew diagonally across southeastern Sweden, passing over Växjö and Norrköping before turning east just south of Stockholm and starting our descent over the Baltic Sea. I’m sure it was a scenic flight, but from my vantage point it left a lot to be desired:


The cabin crew came down the aisle distributing plastic-wrapped snack boxes, which were a little on the chilly side (they’d clearly been in cold storage until that morning) but definitely a nice touch. Inside was a ham-and-cheese sandwich, a small container of foil-topped mineral water, and a candy bar:


A cabin view as the service continued:


After the snack was cleared away I thumbed through the Bluewings inflight magazine, looking at the route maps and fleet information. Finnair operates a dense domestic route network, with mainline aircraft (mostly A320s and E170s) operating flights to obscure-sounding places like Ivalo, Joensuu and Rovaniemi. The remoteness of Finland’s interior and the lack of motorways makes flying the most sensible option for a lot of trips, apparently. At one point another Finnair aircraft went whipping by, although given the distance I couldn’t tell if it was an A320 or an Embraer.

After about 45 minutes at cruise the nose angled down and we sank toward the cloud cover. Most of the descent was flown in clouds, and we hit a fair amount of turbulence on the way down. Although it was only midday, the sky had taken on a dusklike quality:


After several turns in the gloom (during which I lost any bearing I might have had), the mist trailed away and the Finnish countryside appeared below:


From the air Finland looked pretty sparse – dense pine and birch forests, lakes and narrow roads winding between rocky outcroppings. As the landing gear thumped down I realized that this was the furthest north I’d ever been on the planet. It looked very cold and wet… basically, exactly how I’d imagined it (no snow, sadly.)

After turning off the runway we taxied back round to the west end of the terminal complex. I was seated on the wrong side of the aircraft to have a view of anything, but I could see several Finnair birds out the window, as well as a KLM 737 and a Lufthansa A320 parked at the end of Terminal 2. As we wheeled around to our gate we passed an ATR-72 belonging to Aero, one of Finnair’s domestic subsidiaries:


Pulling into our gate, with Helsinki’s intercontinental wing and Finnair maintenance base in the background:


We deplaned via jetbridge into the HEL’s original terminal, a cavernous building designed by local son Eero Saarien (who also designed the TWA terminal at JFK and the main building at Washington Dulles.) It’s more than 30 years old, but it still looks quite modern:


The terminal at Vantaa felt surprisingly large given the slow activity out the windows – just a few Finnair aircraft arriving and departing. Aircraft were arriving on runway 15 (as we had done) and departures seemed to be alternating between 22L and the much more distant 22R. I’m guessing I arrived at a slow time of day, but after CPH, Vantaa felt like a bit of a ghost town.

I headed to baggage claim, on the lower level of Terminal 2:


I had looked over my options for getting into the city prior to my trip; unlike most European cities, Helsinki doesn’t have an airport rail link, although apparently one is being designed. Most of the lanes on the lower-level terminal roadway are given over to buses, which fan out to the central city and various suburbs like Vantaa and Espoo. Finnair runs its own bus, which goes straight into the city for a reasonable five Euros, so I opted for that.

The drive into the city took about 45 minutes, starting out on motorways (which Helsinki seems to have a lot of) that wind through suburbs and shopping centers and rock walls dynamited to make room for the road. From there we were shunted onto a dual carriageway that wove through blocks of flats and warehouses, and finally made our way into the central city. Compared to Denmark, Finland really looked like the “wild north” – pine trees, rushing streams, craggy black rocks coated in moss. I even saw a few log cabins among the other houses in the suburbs. When I’ve visited other European cities, I’ve always taken a train from the airport, so it was interesting to arrive by road for a change.

That’s it for this section of the report – the next one will cover my flight to Stockholm, and I’ll take a more detailed look at Helsinki Vantaa Airport as well. Keep your eyes peeled in the next few days!

23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAndaman From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 8115 times:

Thanks for the report, good job!
Always interesting to see how visitors see your own corners.

By the way, one reason for the several airports in Northern-Finland (RVN, IVL etc) is tourism, both ski tourism and the 'Santa Business'. December is the time for hundreds of Christmas charters especially from UK.

Happy Holidays!


User currently offlineTancrede From Finland, joined May 2006, 245 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 8005 times:

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
The remoteness of Finland’s interior and the lack of motorways makes flying the most sensible option for a lot of trips, apparently.

And I would say that Finland has a very well care road network, quite rare under there latitudes.
Always nice to read a good report about Finnair. I just has been in one of its aircrafts two days ago, after a terrible ordeal through Paris traffic, making me arrive five min before the official departure time of the plane (it was the evening plane of 19:00). Unfortunately, I had to choose between my luggage or myself, so goodbye all the Christmas presents for my family (had to buy everything again here in Helsinki)


User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 7980 times:

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
here’s an A320 pushing back for a flight to Luton

Another really interesting report but that a/c is an A319. Im a picky sonofabitch I know, lol Big grin


User currently offlineDALelite From Switzerland, joined Jun 2000, 1770 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 7845 times:

Once again, great job done here.

cheers: DALelite



They loved to fly and it showed..
User currently offlineFLIEGER67 From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 5170 posts, RR: 55
Reply 5, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 7830 times:

Hi, James,

great, detailed report and interesting pix.
I was for several times connecting at CPH or HEL.
Good reminders.

If you want to see what you missed during your flight, my RIX-report
covered also your route but on an classic SK maddog.

Five Legs, Three Airlines, Tech Plane, STR To RIX (by FLIEGER67 Jun 19 2006 in Trip Reports)?searchid=79337&s=RIX#ID79337

Regards,
Markus (FLIEGER67)



Next: Capital travel on schedule!.
User currently offlineLGAtoIND From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 490 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 7716 times:

Another great report. I really appreciate how you make your reports detailed, yet very interesting.

User currently offlineRCS763AV From Colombia, joined Jun 2004, 4395 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 7558 times:

Excellent report,

I hate to be picky, but the EZjet is an A319, the Austrian Arrows is an F100 and the Spanair is an MD-8?.

Though the read was ver pleasant and the pics were awesome, definately much better than many reports in here which don´t even explain the flight and the pics are terrible.



Les escribo desde el frío de mi verde altiplano.
User currently offlineZRHnerd From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 7418 times:

Great report, again! Didn't you just love Helsinki? I find it to be a lovely city, with a nice nightlife, charming people, and, last but not least, gorgeous ladies  Silly

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
a Swedish acquaintance described it to me as “sort of like Swedish, but it’s like they’re talking with their mouths full of potatoes.

Hahaha, in Finland they told me exactly the same  bigthumbsup 


User currently offlineWhiteBirdFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 7232 times:

Great reports, Parts 1 & 2 !

I look forward to seeing the whole journey. My next vacation plan is for Scandinavia as well. I've spent a lot of time in the Netherlands but never got much farther east. Now I've got some visual incentives to go! Thanks!

Cordially,
WFB


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12251 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (7 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7157 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Another good report.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
little round skylights to let the sun (a rare concept in Denmark) through

 rotfl 

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
SAS Dash 800

Actually, it's called a Dash 8-Q400  Smile (DHC-8-Q400)



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineBA319-131 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 8549 posts, RR: 55
Reply 11, posted (7 years 9 months 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 6929 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Great follow up to part 1.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
An Austrian Arrows Fokker 70 in the Star Alliance scheme

- It's an F100.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
easyJet are one of the few exceptions – here’s an A320 pushing back for a flight to Luton:

- It's actually a 319, perhas to STN? LTN is a 737 base.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
a Spanair 717 on stand next door:

- It's an MD-80.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
We deplaned via jetbridge into the HEL’s original terminal, a cavernous building designed by local son Eero Saarien (who also designed the TWA terminal at JFK and the main building at Washington Dulles.) It’s more than 30 years old, but it still looks quite modern

- Yes, looks great, love HEL.

Rgds

Mark



111,732,3,4,5,7,8,BBJ,741,742,743,744,752,762,763,764,772,77L,773,77W,L15,D10,30,40,AB3,AB6,A312.313,319,320,321,332,333
User currently offlineVonRichtofen From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 4627 posts, RR: 36
Reply 12, posted (7 years 9 months 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 6850 times:

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
ike everything else in Denmark, it shines like brand new, and it’s sleek and modern and full of gorgeous people.

That's Denmark for you Big grin

I can't wait to get my ass back in Scandinavia!

Great report.  Smile

Kris



Word
User currently offlineBMIFlyer From UK - England, joined Feb 2004, 8810 posts, RR: 58
Reply 13, posted (7 years 9 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6791 times:

Cool report.

Great pics too  Smile



Lee



Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own
User currently offlineSomeone83 From Norway, joined Sep 2006, 3401 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6665 times:

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
I couldn’t figure out any rhyme or reason to gate assignments, except that Pier C seemed to handle all intercontinental flights and all SAS Dash 800 flights left from bus gates underneath the main terminal. Is there a pattern to where flights are parked?

Yes there is some kind of pattern, but with A LOT of exeptions. For check-in is T3 SAS and Star Alliance, while T2 is the rest.

When it comes to the Pier is this the general rule of thumb.
Pier A: This is a quite diversified pier, but a majority is probably non-Star Alliance airliners and the part of is is also non-schengen gates.
Pier B: This is all Schengen gates and a majority of the airlines here is Star pertners (and SAS)
Pier C: This is a non schengen pier exept for a few gates and most intercontinental trafic goes from here (most of the widebody gates are on C) In addition most of the bus gates used for turbo props assigned to Pier C although they lay in the "shopping street" between B and C
Pier D: This is mostly SAS but has only 3 or 4 gates and all of them are combi gates (both Schengen and non-Schengen)

However there are no "reserved" gates and for instance Norwegian operates their Oslo flight both from A and B


User currently offlineSomeone83 From Norway, joined Sep 2006, 3401 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6661 times:

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
From what I could gather over the course of my travels, the SAS MD80 and A321 fleet are focused on Copenhagen, while the 737s are based at Stockholm and Oslo. I don’t think I saw any SAS 737s while I was in Copenhagen, but that was just my brief impression:

SAS is somehow didived into 4 sections or companies; SAS Denmark, SAS Sweden and SAS International (Intercontinental) operates under the SAS name, while SAS "Norway" is called SASBraathens (but this is likely to change)

SAS International operates 7 A343 and 4 A333 and currently are the whole fleet exept 2 333 that operates from ARN, based in CPH
SAS Danmark is based in CPH and uses A319, A321, MD-80 and Dash-8-Q400
SAS Sweden used 737-600/700/800, MD-80 and Dash-8-Q400
SASBraathens uses 737-400/500/600/700/800 and F50


User currently offlineLucky727 From Canada, joined Sep 2003, 602 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 6630 times:

Great report! Nicely written, the kind / level of detail most find entertaining, and the pics are great. You've roused me out of the 'hibernating lurker' state I'd reverted to... thumbsup 

Your itinerary reminds me of the trip I did 3 years ago: YYZ-LHR-OSL-AMS-LHR-YYZ...there's a TR buried somewhere here...

Looking forward to the next installations

L727

[Edited 2007-01-03 02:36:21]


··· [·] oooooooo [·] oooo oo ooooo [·] ooooooooooooooooooo [·]
User currently offlineVio From Canada, joined Feb 2004, 1435 posts, RR: 10
Reply 17, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 6606 times:

Awesome Report. Thank you so much for posting it. I really enjoyed your text as well as the photos. It came in very hand to me, as I will be flying there next week as well, though my trip will be a little longer.

Calgary - Seattle (Alaska 737)
Seattle - Copenhagen (Scandinavian A340)
Copenhagen - Helsinki (MD80)

Also, I purchased a separate trip the same day on Aero Airlines (Finnair) from Helsinki to Turku on their ATRs.

I can't wait to visit Copenhagen. I've never been there. Helsinki is a nice airport. I've been there a few times in 1999.

I have a question:

I won't have much time in Denmark, about 3.5 hours, but I would like to know if that's enough time to go see a bit of the city. I'll have my bags checked, etc, however, I'm concerned about the ease of movement from the airport to the city centre. Also, how long are the security check lines? Would 3.5 hours between flights be enough? Keep in mind the flight I'm connecting to is to the USA (Seattle). Would that make a difference? (Security check in etc)...

Thank you,

Vio



Superior decisions reduce the need for superior skills.
User currently offlineHimmelstormer From Denmark, joined Mar 2005, 143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (7 years 9 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 6593 times:

Quoting Vio (Reply 17):
have a question:

I won't have much time in Denmark, about 3.5 hours, but I would like to know if that's enough time to go see a bit of the city. I'll have my bags checked, etc, however, I'm concerned about the ease of movement from the airport to the city centre. Also, how long are the security check lines? Would 3.5 hours between flights be enough? Keep in mind the flight I'm connecting to is to the USA (Seattle). Would that make a difference? (Security check in etc)...

Thank you,

Vio

It's a very short train ride from CPH to Copenhagen Central Station - about 15 minutes. From the station you're about a 5-minte walk from "Strøget"(the main pedestrian shopping street where one of the pictures from the report is taken from). You'll pass The Town Hall Square(Rådhuspladsen) on your way, and Nyhavn(New Harbour) is a 20-minute walk from the station. So it is possible but of course you won't have a lot of time. Anyway, I hope you make it and enjoy your trip.


User currently offlineJsnww81 From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2037 posts, RR: 15
Reply 19, posted (7 years 9 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6552 times:

Quoting Vio (Reply 17):
I won't have much time in Denmark, about 3.5 hours, but I would like to know if that's enough time to go see a bit of the city. I'll have my bags checked, etc, however, I'm concerned about the ease of movement from the airport to the city centre. Also, how long are the security check lines? Would 3.5 hours between flights be enough? Keep in mind the flight I'm connecting to is to the USA (Seattle). Would that make a difference? (Security check in etc)...

As Himmelstormer said, you *probably* will be able to do it. The train ride to København H (what they call the main train station) is very, very short, although I usually transferred to the Metro at Ørestad, which takes a little bit longer but drops you off right at Kongens Nytorv, the main square next to the Nyhavn canal and Strøget. If you go to København H, you're on the other side of the city, but the downtown area is pretty compact and very easy to walk around... if you use Strøget you can cross the entire city in about 25 minutes.

Check-in lines at CPH were pretty long for some airlines - I was always using the premier line so it never took me more than 5 minutes. As for the security lines at CPH, I never had any trouble. I was using the Terminal 2 checkpoint. If you're flying SAS you'll probably use the T3 checkpoint instead. So you could probably go to the city and back, but you won't have a ton of time.


User currently offline767747 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1943 posts, RR: 24
Reply 20, posted (7 years 9 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6520 times:
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Nice report! I traveled through Copenhagen back in '02 and thought the airport was very nice.

767747


User currently offlineHimmelstormer From Denmark, joined Mar 2005, 143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (7 years 9 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 6447 times:

I forgot to say in my previous post that really enjoyed the report. It's also interesting to hear about other people's experiences with both CPH and Copenhagen.

For me flyvergrillen is a very unique place as well. In the summer the staff work their socks off, because so many people go there to get a hot dog or an ice cream while checking out planes. Sometimes you'll hear people referring to SAS' Airbus A343s as DC-10s, or Boeing 767s as jumbo jets. Always brings a smile to my face. My little nephew used to have an obsession with Maersk because he once flew with them to Venice. Next time we go out there, I'll have to tell him that they are no longer around, which will be hard for him to accept. Anyway, great report!


User currently offlineUpperDeck79 From Finland, joined Feb 2005, 1139 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 6303 times:

Again, nice report, but I still have to say something...

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
as at many European airports, gate assignments aren't posted until about half an hour before boarding, to keep passengers out of the piers and in the shopping areas

The operational reason is gate utilisation: to fit as many flights onto jetbridges as possible. And because you don't want to have a lot of changed gate assignments, they only announce them when they are sure the previous plane is able to leave on time. Airlines don't own the gates like in the States.

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
The first five or six rows had been separated as business class, with the middle seats intentionally left empty (most European airlines do this on shorthaul flights rather than having a separate cabin as we do in the US

It's not just leaving the seat empty, they widen the seats which are used to a 3+2 layout. You can see how the aisle has moved a bit and the middle seat which is not used is too slim to fit anyone:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Serge Bailleul - AirTeamImages



Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
As we wheeled around to our gate we passed an ATR-72 belonging to Aero, one of Finnair's domestic subsidiaries

Aero is AY's subsidiary but based in Estonia, not Finland. It flies both Finnish domestic routes and international flights (HEL-TLL, HEL-RIX).

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
The terminal at Vantaa felt surprisingly large given the slow activity out the windows – just a few Finnair aircraft arriving and departing.

You should be there when all the Europe-Asia connecting pax are there between 3-6 p.m.! Big grin

Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
local son Eero Saarien (who also designed the TWA terminal at JFK and the main building at Washington Dulles

"Saarinen" for those who want to google it.  Wink



AY and ANA rock!
User currently offlineAndaman From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (7 years 8 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6264 times:

Quoting UpperDeck79 (Reply 22):
Quoting Jsnww81 (Thread starter):
local son Eero Saarien (who also designed the TWA terminal at JFK and the main building at Washington Dulles



Quoting UpperDeck79 (Reply 22):

"Saarinen" for those who want to google it.

Come on... Finnish names can be difficult.
But, the first original terminal from 1969 wasn't designed by Eero Saarinen who died 1961, but architects Ström & Tuomisto, but anyway...


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