sunbird
Posts: 278
Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2002 12:10 am

Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Sun Jul 14, 2002 12:33 am

Cause I was on my way spotting and saw what I thought was a English Electric Canberra landing here @ 5 Wing Goose Bay in Canada........what a beauty of an aircraft, when I went on the air base to get a shot of it I couldnt find it I assume it went into one of the RAF's hangers
 
2912n
Posts: 1978
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2001 2:12 pm

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Sun Jul 14, 2002 1:32 am

Yes, the Canberra still flies. It has been used extensively in Afghanistan. In the high altitude recon mode I believe.
 
FlagshipAZ
Posts: 3192
Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2001 12:40 am

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Sun Jul 14, 2002 1:37 am

Per my issue of 2002 Aviation Week Aerospace Source Book, the Royal Air Force has seven BAE Systems Canberras'...the PR.9 & T.4 versions.
Hope that helps. Regards.
"Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." --Ben Franklin
 
 
Guest

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Tue Jul 16, 2002 5:00 am

Subsequent to the discussion in the previous thread referred to by GDB, I read in AFM magazine that the RAF Canberra PR.9s had been deployed over Somalia to seek for possible Al-Queda bases - that's most likely what that one photographed in Egypt was doing in that part of the world.

FlagshipAZ, don't want to be picky, but your source is wrong in calling them BAE Systems Canberras - that manufacturer has only been around for the last few years - the PR.9s were built by BAC (British Aircraft Corporation), the successor to English Electric. While BAE Systems is in turn a "successor" of BAC, one can't change the name of the manufacturer retrospectively (do you hear that, all you "Boeing F-15" fans  Big grin)

 
LY744
Posts: 5185
Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2001 11:55 pm

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Tue Jul 16, 2002 7:19 am

The difference is that Boeing now continues manufacturing the F-15 (as LM is doing with the ex-General Dynamics F-16).

LY744.
Pacifism only works if EVERYBODY practices it
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Tue Jul 16, 2002 5:09 pm

I personally am surprised that Boeing hasn't issued a service bulletian for all of those MD products who have those wheel covers embossed with the letters MDC on them.

I can picture them issuing an AD requiring them to be switched to ones that say Boeing or BAC

Seriously though, all of the sales promo's for those old MD aircraft now say they are "Boeing"
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
broke
Posts: 1299
Joined: Wed Apr 24, 2002 8:04 pm

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Tue Jul 16, 2002 9:19 pm

If there ever a need to keep at least one or two of an aircraft type flying, it has to be the Canberra. The airplane first flew in the late '40's and a few are still doing the job that nothing else seems to be able to do, yet. It is one of the real classics of aviation. Hopefully, a foundation will be established to take care of a couple of these wonderful airplanes. Considering some of the warbirds that are flying these days, maintaining a couple of Canberras shouldn't be nearly as expensive.
 
GDB
Posts: 12653
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Wed Jul 17, 2002 12:29 am

I recently saw a new photo of a Canberra PR.9A, (not on the web), the aircraft was deployed over the Mid-East or N.Africa, with additional aerials under the aircraft, don't know the purpose of them-a real time data-link maybe? Be useful for the sort of fleeting targets they'd be looking for.
 
Guest

RE: Does The UK A/F Still Fly The English Electric?

Thu Jul 18, 2002 10:24 pm

The Indian Air Force still uses the Canberra . The No 2 Target towing Sqn is using it presently . I believe that the a/c is still used for photo recon in some areas.

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