TedTAce
Topic Author
Posts: 9098
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Buff Picture OTD Question

Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:37 pm

I was looking @ http://www.airliners.net/open.file/1137263/M/

And I noticed a few things.

The most obvious being the jack stands at the outer ends of the wings. This one is a duh (metal fatigue).

More obscure (to me) is why the flaps down position is better for long term storage (guessing Hydaulic power holds them up).

And Un-imagineable to me are the inboard aileron positions. It seems like they are articulated in opposing manner much the way I would expect if such a deflection were to occur in flight, but the question comes down to this: is there a mechanical linkage that even while powered off (as obviously is the case) that keeps the ailerons opposite? Why does it have such a system? Wouldn't it be easier (less weight/money) to have hydraulic controls set opposite? Or would that just make it a FRED?
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UH60FtRucker
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RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:53 pm

Ted, I really can't provide answers to your questions... but just commenting on that picture, check out that B model in the center, with it's distinctive high tail. With a bird that old, I wonder what the chances are that this particular aircraft was flying over the north pole during the Cuban Missile Crisis?

If you ever get the chance to talk to some of the older B-52 pilots - especially pre-Vietnam, they've got some amazing stories. This picture rocks simply because of the history, and sense of awe, that it conjures up.

-UH60
Your men have to follow your orders. They don't have to go to your funeral.
 
L-188
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Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Mon Nov 13, 2006 3:07 pm

Quoting TedTAce (Thread starter):
The most obvious being the jack stands at the outer ends of the wings. This one is a duh (metal fatigue).

More then likely the outrigger wheels have been removed as spares for the remaining fleet.

Quoting TedTAce (Thread starter):
More obscure (to me) is why the flaps down position is better for long term storage (guessing Hydaulic power holds them up).

They probably bleed down.

Quoting TedTAce (Thread starter):
And Un-imagineable to me are the inboard aileron positions. It seems like they are articulated in opposing manner much the way I would expect if such a deflection were to occur in flight, but the question comes down to this: is there a mechanical linkage that even while powered off (as obviously is the case) that keeps the ailerons opposite? Why does it have such a system? Wouldn't it be easier (less weight/money) to have hydraulic controls set opposite? Or would that just make it a FRED?

This aircraft is from a time where boosted flight controls where still a new concept. I have no doubt there are still cables tying them together.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
474218
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Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2005 12:27 pm

RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:01 am

The B-52's flaps cannot be extended without hydraulic power, so they extend the flaps when the plane is parked (waiting to be dismantled for parts) so the attaching hardware is accessible.
 
Venus6971
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RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:15 am

Plus at the time that was a D-Model in the center. All the D models are gone except a few that survived as static displays. Most hard to get parts have been striped and the fuselages turned into beer cans and razor blades.
I would help you but it is not in the contract
 
SlamClick
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RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:14 am

Quoting TedTAce (Thread starter):
inboard aileron positions. It seems like they are articulated in opposing manner

Don't know a great deal about the B-52 but it is not uncommon for boosted ailerons to be cable-bussed together in such a manner that one will never deflect without getting the appropriate throw from the opposite one. Would not be at all surprised if that were the case here.

The B-52 no doubt incorporated some provisions, like inboard ailerons, that arose from the "aeroelasticity" issues experienced by the B-47.

Aren't they cool though?
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
JakeOrion
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RE: Buff Picture OTD Question

Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:42 am

Isn't the hydraulic fluid pumped out of the aircraft before the axe? Another reason why they might bleed down, maybe...
Every problem has a simple solution; finding the simple solution is the difficult problem.

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