oly720man
Topic Author
Posts: 5740
Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 7:13 am

RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Thu Apr 22, 2010 5:27 pm

Interesting news.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8637978.stm

Training flights on RAF Typhoons in Lincolnshire have been suspended after ash deposits were found in one aircraft's engines.

The fleet is being checked at its base in Coningsby, Lincolnshire.
wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
 
User avatar
kc135topboom
Posts: 10997
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2005 2:26 am

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:01 pm

Volcanic ash and jet engines just don't mix well. Bad things can likely happen to the motors. That can ruin your day.
 
TGIF
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 1:01 pm

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Sat Apr 24, 2010 8:10 am

The Finnish air force has also found ash in the engines of 5 of its Hornets. It really surprises me that the air forces aren't more careful with its expensive equipment since it is, as KC135 says, a well known fact that aircraft in general and jet engines in particular don't get along with volcanic ash.
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13916
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:25 am

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:41 am

Also military low bypass engines are more sensitive to volcanic ash than commercial high bypass engines. The reason is that the fan and spinner on the high bypass engines act like a centrifuge to push the heavier dust particles into the bypass stream where they can´t cause much damage (they are from house designed to do this e.g. with rain droplets, hail graikns and snow flakes). On military engines much more goes stright into the primary airflow.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
opso1
Posts: 430
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:34 am

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Thu Apr 29, 2010 9:37 am

There has been (not very much) media coverage about the suspension of training flights on RAF Typhoons in Lincolnshire with claims that ash deposits were found in the engines of four aircraft, but the Royal Air Force wanted to raise the Typhoon's profile again so posted this on their official website on 23rd April...

"RAF engineers have confirmed there has been no damage to any of the Typhoon aircraft or engines following precautionary investigation of volcanic ash deposits. This is because there were no airshows or flypasts taking place at the time of the volcanic eruptions.

Typhoon flying at RAF Coningsby recommenced at 0800hrs this morning following the checks, where they continued practising doing fast flypasts and loops.

The Typhoon is presently of little operational use, and has been deployed on quick alert to be rapidly launched to react to air defence threats by aggressive looping and 'mean looking flypasts'.

Luckily there was no call for this during the volcanic ash threat, as it would have cost defence £7.6bn to replace Tranche 1,2 and 3 and fund an uplift of OF4, 5 and 6 officers to staff the replacements.

The Typhoon was deemed totally inadequate to replace the Harrier in theatre in 2009, as Service Chiefs were forced to choose the Tornado instead. It was decided that 'a very agressive loop' was not enough firepower to deny the Taliban and protect coalition forces.

Typhoon (or Eurofighter) crews have been practising a 'death-barrel roll' and 'really nasty half-cuban' followed by a 'eye-watering quarter clover' to see if they can get in on the operational action, however they have not been cleared for 'the very, very bad wingover' as when this was practised it resulted in a near crash by the highly trained pilot and the Station Commander wetting himself".
 
User avatar
par13del
Posts: 6670
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 9:14 pm

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:43 pm

Quoting opso1 (Reply 4):
Typhoon (or Eurofighter) crews have been practising a 'death-barrel roll' and 'really nasty half-cuban' followed by a 'eye-watering quarter clover' to see if they can get in on the operational action, however they have not been cleared for 'the very, very bad wingover' as when this was practised it resulted in a near crash by the highly trained pilot and the Station Commander wetting himself".

I take it that these are manuevers to put bombs or rockets on target?

Quoting opso1 (Reply 4):
The Typhoon is presently of little operational use, and has been deployed on quick alert to be rapidly launched to react to air defence threats by aggressive looping and 'mean looking flypasts'.

Is this one related to being cleared to launch any of the RAF's current air to air missiles, could they simply load them for show? If truly needed I'm sure they could be cleared in a hearbeat, just goes to show how much money is now involved in getting basic things done by using procedures and paperwork.
 
Bongodog1964
Posts: 3069
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 6:29 am

RE: RAF Typhoon With Ash Problems.

Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:43 am

Quoting par13del (Reply 5):
Quoting opso1 (Reply 4):
The Typhoon is presently of little operational use, and has been deployed on quick alert to be rapidly launched to react to air defence threats by aggressive looping and 'mean looking flypasts'.

Is this one related to being cleared to launch any of the RAF's current air to air missiles, could they simply load them for show? If truly needed I'm sure they could be cleared in a hearbeat, just goes to show how much money is now involved in getting basic things done by using procedures and paperwork.

I think this is the truth behind it all. The procedures to authorise general release of weapons is very long and drawn out.If however there was an emergency the rule book would be swiftly consigned to the bin, as it was for both the Falklands and the 1st Gulf war, where new weapons were installed and integrated into the aircraft systems in a matter of weeks or even days.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests