rc135x
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Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 11:46 am

General/Admiral/Flag Officer Aircraft Crashes

Mon Feb 25, 2013 3:42 pm

I am researching military aircraft crashes with a general or admiral or "flag officer" at the controls. For example:

17 January 1968, Minot AFB, ND, KC-135A, over-rotated in blizzard after waiving weather minimums.

9 September 1972, Randolph AFB, TX., T-38A, crashed on takeoff after boasting of an "aerobatic departure."

26 April 1984, Nevada Test Ranges, MiG-23, crashed during flight after waiving conversion training to fly the airplane.

I am sure there are others, and would especially be interested in those of non-U.S. forces.
KC-135A, A(RT), D, E, E(RT), Q, R, EC-135A, C, G, L, RC-135S, U, V, W, X, TC-135S, W
 
fsnuffer
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RE: General/Admiral/Flag Officer Aircraft Crashes

Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:00 pm

NYTimes - April 20, 1985

"Gen. Jerome F. O'Malley, commander of the United States Air Force Tactical Air Command, died Saturday in the crash of a military aircraft at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport. He was 53 years old. Witnesses said the aircraft, a twin- engine CT-39 Sabreliner, overshot a runway at the airport, dropped from a 175-foot cliff and burst into flames. The crash also killed General O'Malley's wife, Diane, and the three Air Force crew members aboard."

General O'Malley was listed as the co-pilot.
 
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Moose135
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RE: General/Admiral/Flag Officer Aircraft Crashes

Mon Feb 25, 2013 8:48 pm

Quoting rc135x (Thread starter):
over-rotated in blizzard after waiving weather minimums
Quoting rc135x (Thread starter):
crashed on takeoff after boasting of an "aerobatic departure."
Quoting rc135x (Thread starter):
crashed during flight after waiving conversion training to fly the airplane.

I'm sensing a trend here...
 
KC-135 - Passing gas and taking names!
 
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neutrino
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RE: General/Admiral/Flag Officer Aircraft Crashes

Tue Feb 26, 2013 4:01 pm

In the later half of the seventies, the then fledging Republic of Singapore Air Force had a bunch of senior foreign-born pilots helping the little new nation to establish a potent air arm. The top flyer at the time was a Brigadier (just about the highest brass in the Singapore Armed Forces back then) of either British or US origin. Due to the sands of time, a lot of details including the name escape me for the moment but he met his demise on a Douglas A-4S Skyhawk shortly prior to landing at the Tengah Air Base. A big friendly hulk of a man who always had a nice word for the crew, and in his own words; "a good pilot never finds fault with his plane".
Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis

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