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Tugger
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"Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:58 pm

The launch yesterday of Falcon Heavy with Starman inside just got me to thinking about the possible reality soon of burials in space. That oddly sounds like something I would be interested in when that time comes. Cremation is and has always been what I figured I'd have done but space? Sounds cooler along with the idea of potentially floating around for millions of years.

Anyone else think this would be "the way to go"?

I am sure there would be at least two options: One being cremated then flown and the other being sent "intact" into space. And then in addition to that one could be sent into orbit to then burn up in the atmosphere, sent into the sun, or orbit around the sun. I guess you could also be shot at an asteroid too (but I am sure some would be concerned about "contamination" etc.

What barriers or issues would there be to this? The idea of someday there being millions (billions?) of dead people floating around in space would be one thing. What other issues might there be? I know cost is one thing but I am sure they can pack thousands of cremains onto a launch and for full-body the cost would obviously be significantly higher but still doable.

Thoughts?

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
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Dutchy
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:01 pm

I think there was a company which does just that, with the asses that is.

For me much more close to the hart:
- your family hasn't got a place to morn you
- the cost: why would I wast money like that? Sounds to me much more of an ego trip after you are gone
Many happy landings, greetings from The Netherlands!
 
HHScot
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:41 pm

Cool idea. But don't we have enough issues with space debris as it is without deliberately firing off bodies into orbit?
 
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Tugger
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:54 pm

HHScot wrote:
Cool idea. But don't we have enough issues with space debris as it is without deliberately firing off bodies into orbit?

Well anything going to "earth orbit" would actually have to be suborbital or on a path that leads to burn up predictably in a timely manner to prevent that.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
WIederling
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:05 pm

Tugger wrote:
Anyone else think this would be "the way to go"?


Heinlein in one of his later books.
Lazarus friend math wizz Libby's corpse is "buried" by reentry into earth atmosphere over the Ozark Mountains ( afair ).
I'd like that too.
If unavailable I would not mind my ashes flushed down the toilet or what ever.
Murphy is an optimist
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:24 pm

Dutchy wrote:
For me much more close to the hart:
- your family hasn't got a place to morn you
- the cost: why would I wast money like that? Sounds to me much more of an ego trip after you are gone


That's the question all the time. Do the relatives need a place? Do they need some remains? Or can they basically vanish somewhere? Do they need a ceremony? If so, which kind?

While some people can put an urn at the fireside, other people feel reminded that it's the remains of a dead. They want it buried somewhere. Others would like to scatter the ashes on their own back yard... but have problems when they have to sell the property.

It's a good idea to discuss the funeral long before you die, so the relatives are familiar with the ideas, and can also bring in their own.

Just 10 days ago, I scattered the ashes of somebody I accompanied for several years.


Returning to the topic: If I want my ashes sent up to space, then I want some serious slingshot maneuvers and I want to leave the solar system. I'm not going to settle for less. :old:

...but more realistically... I want my ashes be scattered on a place I liked (well, preferably not the children's playground in my home town). And instead of firing me up into the skies, I rather want my (grand-)children to get some good telescopes.


David
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Tugger
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:24 pm

Dutchy wrote:
I think there was a company which does just that, with the asses that is.

For me much more close to the hart:
- your family hasn't got a place to morn you
- the cost: why would I wast money like that? Sounds to me much more of an ego trip after you are gone

Well family truly mourns in their memories, and if you speak of "wasted money" then space on the ground costs money, and does cremation actually create that "place" to mourn someone"
And also as to wasted money:
Image
Image
Image
Image
People have been wasting money on that for a long time.

As they say, it is your money, you can do what you want with it.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
vikkyvik
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:53 am

Dutchy wrote:
with the asses that is.


Sorry, that made me laugh. I think you meant "ashes".

HHScot wrote:
But don't we have enough issues with space debris as it is without deliberately firing off bodies into orbit?


We do indeed.

Tugger wrote:
Well anything going to "earth orbit" would actually have to be suborbital or on a path that leads to burn up predictably in a timely manner to prevent that.


Yes, but for satellites in LEO at least, the burn-up time is not short - 25 years by international agreement, from what I understand.
flyingturtle wrote:
Dutchy wrote:
For me much more close to the hart:
- your family hasn't got a place to morn you
- the cost: why would I wast money like that? Sounds to me much more of an ego trip after you are gone



That's the question all the time. Do the relatives need a place? Do they need some remains? Or can they basically vanish somewhere? Do they need a ceremony? If so, which kind?


A few years ago, my grandmother, to whom I was very close, died. We knew she would be cremated, being Hindu, but beyond that, there was some debate as to what to do with the ashes. Ultimately, they were spread at an area at the crematorium/cemetery. I think about her almost every day, but I've never been back to the crematorium, because it's not a place that is at all special to me or to her.

So I dunno...while I do visit other graves, I tend toward the "it's not really necessary" end of the spectrum these days.

All that said, a ceremony is certainly nice. Mostly just to get people together. That's the important part to me.

Tugger wrote:
Well family truly mourns in their memories


Agreed.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
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Francoflier
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 5:04 am

Just cram my stiff self in a space suit, stick me inside a red convertible and launch me on a tour of the solar system, thanks.

Has anybody got $90 million I can borrow?
My kids are good for them, I swear...
I'll do my own airline. With Blackjack. And hookers. In fact, forget the airline.
 
zanl188
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:01 am

Companies have been doing this since the 90s. Here’s one:

https://www.celestis.com
Legal considerations provided by: Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe
 
WIederling
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:35 am

Francoflier wrote:
Just cram my stiff self in a space suit, stick me inside a red convertible and launch me on a tour of the solar system, thanks.
Has anybody got $90 million I can borrow? My kids are good for them, I swear...

Beware the Loc Nar :-)

Musk seems to have done homage to Heavy Metal ( the Movie ).
Murphy is an optimist
 
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Tugger
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:32 pm

Interesting article on the effects of space beyond the earths protective Van Allen belts:
, over very long time horizons, it's unlikely the vehicle could avoid the kind of collisions with micrometeorites that leave other space junk riddled with craters over time, Carroll said.

But assuming those collisions don't completely tear the car apart, the radiation will.
[...]
"All of the organics will be subjected to degradation by the various kinds of radiation that you will run into there," Carroll said.
[...]
The energy of stellar radiation can cause those bonds to snap. And that can cause the car to fall to bits as effectively as if it were attacked with a knife.

https://www.livescience.com/61680-will- ... space.html

Though on the Tesla Roadster the same effects would obviously apply to any body sent up into solar orbit.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
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Channex757
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:56 pm

There's a sort of pleasing symmetry to sending ashes into space. We came from the stars via supernovae creating our elements, so back to the stars we go.

There have been a few, the most notable to me being James Doohan (Scotty) from Star Trek. Gene Roddenberry's remains were flown on a Shuttle but returned to earth. I wonder when we'll see space funerals eventually breaking free and heading out of low earth orbit.
 
tommy1808
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 6:06 pm

Tugger wrote:
Thoughts?

Tugg


Image

https://what-if.xkcd.com/134/

Best regards
Thomas
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RetiredWeasel
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:32 pm

Tugger wrote:
..."sent into the sun,".....
Tugg


Not really an option. We've only only achieved a little over half the velocity on a rocket that is required to get drawn into the sun. This summer NASA will launch a solar probe that gets within 4 million miles of the sun, but it will require 7 years to do that and needs 7 passes near Venus to effectively slow it down and allow it's orbit closer to the sun. Remember any rocket launched from earth assumes the earth's orbital velocity. Launching spacecraft in the opposite direction of earth's orbit would require velocities we haven't achieved yet to get pulled into the sun.
 
tommy1808
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:08 pm

RetiredWeasel wrote:
Tugger wrote:
..."sent into the sun,".....
Tugg


Not really an option. We've only only achieved a little over half the velocity on a rocket that is required to get drawn into the sun. This summer NASA will launch a solar probe that gets within 4 million miles of the sun, but it will require 7 years to do that and needs 7 passes near Venus to effectively slow it down and allow it's orbit closer to the sun.


That is just to shorten the flight time. Getting stuff into the sun is quite easy by launching outwards, negate the little speed at perihelion and let suns gravity do the rest. Plenty of probes had speeds beyond achieving that. It would just take reeeeaaallly long....

best regards
Thomas
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RetiredWeasel
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Re: "Burial" in Space

Fri Feb 09, 2018 3:25 pm

tommy1808 wrote:
RetiredWeasel wrote:
Tugger wrote:
..."sent into the sun,".....
Tugg


Not really an option. We've only only achieved a little over half the velocity on a rocket that is required to get drawn into the sun. This summer NASA will launch a solar probe that gets within 4 million miles of the sun, but it will require 7 years to do that and needs 7 passes near Venus to effectively slow it down and allow it's orbit closer to the sun.


That is just to shorten the flight time. Getting stuff into the sun is quite easy by launching outwards, negate the little speed at perihelion and let suns gravity do the rest. Plenty of probes had speeds beyond achieving that. It would just take reeeeaaallly long....

best regards
Thomas


You're right, but I believe the complexity of doing that, particularly on the way back, is a little more involved than 'easy'. Here's a rather humorous video of somebody using a simulation program to do just that but using Jupiter to aid the the profile. I don't know how accurate it is and I'm no astro-physicist either.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNS6VKNXY6s

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