Ozair
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Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:25 pm

As we have threads for the A400M and the KC-390 I thought it would be worth creating one for the Kawasaki C-2 as we start to see some traction and news.

Some info from wiki on the C-2,
The Kawasaki C-2 is a long range twin-engine transport aircraft. In comparison with the older C-1 that it replaces, the C-2 can carry payloads up to four times heavier, such as MIM-104 Patriot surface-to-air missile (SAM) batteries and Mitsubishi H-60 helicopters, and possesses six times the range.

The C-2 is being developed to meet the following requirements of the Ministry of Defense: a minimum payload of 26 tonnes, 120 metric ton (264,552 lb 132.275 short ton) take-off weight, ability to takeoff/land on short runways, (Requirement: 500m, almost same as C-1, e.g. Tachikawa—900 m, Kamigoto—800 m, Hateruma—800 m), a maximum payload of 37,600 kg whilst taking off from a 2,300 m Take-off Field Length at a 141 tonnes (310,851 lb 155.42 short ton) take-off weight, ability to fly international airroutes (Requirement: Mach 0.8+; JDA ruled out C-17 as a candidate by its lower cruising speed.

Conventional cargo aircraft cannot cruise at optimum altitude on commercial airroutes because of their lower cruising speed and are often assigned to lower altitude by ATC., in-flight aerial refuelling and forward looking infrared systems.

The C-2 is powered by a pair of General Electric CF6-80C2K turbofan engines. While sharing fuselage components with the Kawasaki P-1, the fuselage of the C-2's is substantially larger to accommodate a vast internal cargo deck, which is furnished with an automated loading/unloading system to reduce workloads on personnel and ground equipment. The forward fuselage and horizontal stabilizer is made of an internally-designedcomposite material, KMS6115. A tactical flight management system and head-up display is installed to reduce the challenges involved in flying at low altitudes or close to mountainous terrain. The C-2 is equipped with a fullglass cockpit, fly-by-wire flight controls, a high-precision navigation system, and self protection systems

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_C-2

The C-2 is obviously being funded and acquired by Japan and we know that the aircraft is currently five years behind schedule. Aalthough the JSDF has requested 10 aircraft in the 2014-2018 period the Japanese Government has only funded seven.

While the fiscal 2014-18 procurement plan calls for 10 C-2 transport planes, contractor Kawasaki Heavy Industries is running about five years behind schedule. Funds have been budgeted for only seven of the planes so far. A dearth of C-2s, used to carry combat vehicles and midsize helicopters in addition to personnel, could hinder Japan's efforts to defend outlying islands and respond to disasters.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Econom ... nderfunded

Kawasaki has offered a commercial C-2 but so far this has yet to garner any interest.
Image

We also know the C-2 has started appearing in international sales campaigns including a visit to NZ.

Japan’s air force said on Friday it will send its new C-2 long-range heavy lift military cargo plane overseas for the first time to show it off to potential buyers in the Middle East and New Zealand.
Built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, the C-2 will fly to the United Arab Emirates on Nov. 8 to participate in the Dubai Airshow and will be on display in New Zealand from Nov. 25 to Dec. 1, the Japan Air Self Defence Force said in a news release.
A C-2 sale would secure Japan its first major overseas arms contract.
“A number of nations have shown interest in the C-2 and we want to show off our advanced technology,” Japan’s Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera told a regular media briefing.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-japan ... KKBN1CB0CB

Finally there is the below report on a new variant of the C-2

Images reveal progress on Japan’s C-2 intelligence-gathering variant

The test bed of Japan’s intelligence gathering version of the Kawasaki C-2 airlifter has broken cover, with photographs emerging of the aircraft undergoing taxi tests.
The photo, taken Tuesday at the Japan Air Self-Defense Force base at Gifu, shows a C-2 with enlarged fairings on the nose, tail, top and sides of the rear fuselage. According to documents released by Japanese Defense Ministry’s acquisition agency, the aircraft variant will have an electronic intelligence/communications intelligence suite.

https://www.defensenews.com/digital-sho ... g-variant/

An image from twitter can be seen here,
https://twitter.com/Gifu119V3/status/96 ... variant%2F

I’m surprised Japan is pursuing a C-2 variant for EW/ISR, I would have thought the P-1 was a better platform for this type of work, or even modify a 767 given they already have of number of that aircraft in their fleet.
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:50 pm

Some images of the aircraft.

Image


Image


Image


Image
 
Kiwirob
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:13 am

I think it has a pretty decent chance in NZ, whoever is the first export customer will probably get a fairly significant discount.
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:47 am

Kiwirob wrote:
I think it has a pretty decent chance in NZ, whoever is the first export customer will probably get a fairly significant discount.

While the first export customer will likely get a discount they probably take on some significant risk given Japanese doesn't have a history of exporting and supporting military equipment of this size.

I also see no reason it couldn't fulfil the Antartic run for NZ which seems to be a desired feature by interested parties. I know NZ has been approved for the P-8 but has yet to formaly order. A combined P-1/C-2 order would make a lot of sense but I guess that depends on what NZ wants to do with maritime patrol.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:40 am

It will largely come down to what the NZ government decides are the requirements for both maratime patrol and airlift.

I know the airlift replacement project has been started. So it's probably in the defining requirements stage right now.

But yeah, I would agree NZ is probably the current front runner for the first export. Especially if a requirement is put in to do the Antarctic resupply run with no point of no return. The new fleet supply ship is going to be ice strengthend to do summer supply runs so that might relieve any pressure to do heavy lift and leave any need to light and passenger loads.

For the RNZAF the other obvious option is the KC-390 which also suffers somewhat from the lack of any outside of Brazil support for military aircraft.

Personally I think the C-2 is slightly ahead but we'll have to wait a few years for a final decision to be made.
 
Max Q
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:56 am

This airlifted market is starting to get a bit crowded, we have the C130J, A400, E
Last edited by Max Q on Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
 
Max Q
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:03 am

[quote="Max Q"]This airlifted market is starting to get a bit crowded, we have the C130J, A400, E390, C2 and the C17 all chasing a similar mission


Where exactly does the C2 fit in ?
Can it operate on unimproved airfields?


I’m sure it’s a well built, solid product but why would any other country buy it bearing
in mind the limited production run and difficulty with global support and spares
availability?
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:23 pm

Max Q wrote:
This airlifted market is starting to get a bit crowded, we have the C130J, A400, E390, C2 and the C17 all chasing a similar mission

Well the C-17 is now out of production and no more are available. To add to the above the IL-76 has been updated and looking for exports, also add the Chinese Y-20 which I expect to soon be offered for export.


Max Q wrote:
Where exactly does the C2 fit in ?
Can it operate on unimproved airfields?

The C-2 does not operate from unimproved runways but it is very capable of short take off and landing on a standard runway. Saying that, it has been weather tested in Japan and is capable of landing on snow and ice.

Max Q wrote:
I’m sure it’s a well built, solid product but why would any other country buy it bearing
in mind the limited production run and difficulty with global support and spares
availability?

The lack of experience Japan has in the export market is a huge factor. It does benefit from using the CF-6 which is still in service with a large number of airlines and military customers around the world so engine support shouldn’t be too much of an issue.

As for where it fits, countries like NZ and the UAE have expressed an interest in the capability. While it doesn’t have that unimproved runway performance it comes in significantly cheaper than comparable aircraft while still having the capability to land a significant payload. For nations that have no requirement to land an AFV to a forward deployed dirt strip, and that list of nations is many, the C-2 offers military transport capabilities at a comparatively affordable price. The C-2 also has significant commonality with the P-1 maritime patrol aircraft so in some cases a military will be able to leverage two specialised aircraft and have a reasonably common spares and maintenance pool.
 
bunumuring
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Sat Feb 17, 2018 9:12 pm

Hey Ozair,
I read in the current issue of 'Air International' magazine that one Y-20 was offered to Bangladesh recently in a package of military planes from China, so I guess the Y-20 is now available for export.
I agree that NZ looks likely to be the first export customer for the C-2. I just can't see it effectively replacing the two 757s in the RNZAF fleet....
Cheers
Bunumuring
I just wanna live while I'm alive!
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Sun Feb 18, 2018 3:48 am

bunumuring wrote:
Hey Ozair,
I read in the current issue of 'Air International' magazine that one Y-20 was offered to Bangladesh recently in a package of military planes from China, so I guess the Y-20 is now available for export.

Good to know. Seems like a larger aircraft than Bangladesh probably need but I am sure they will find a use for it.

bunumuring wrote:
I agree that NZ looks likely to be the first export customer for the C-2. I just can't see it effectively replacing the two 757s in the RNZAF fleet....
Cheers
Bunumuring

Why do you think the C-2 cannot replace the 757 in NZ service? From a capability perspective the C-2 has a longer range with the same payload and can carry outsize payloads included NZ helicopters and AFVs. It won't impress the NZ public as much at airshows given the NZ 757s had built quite the reputation for demos but that clearly shouldn't be a determining factor.
 
ZKNCI
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Sun Feb 18, 2018 7:18 am

Ozair wrote:
bunumuring wrote:
I agree that NZ looks likely to be the first export customer for the C-2. I just can't see it effectively replacing the two 757s in the RNZAF fleet....
Cheers
Bunumuring

Why do you think the C-2 cannot replace the 757 in NZ service? From a capability perspective the C-2 has a longer range with the same payload and can carry outsize payloads included NZ helicopters and AFVs. It won't impress the NZ public as much at airshows given the NZ 757s had built quite the reputation for demos but that clearly shouldn't be a determining factor.


Agreed on the C-2 being able to replace the 757. I really like the 757, but its main gains over the Hercs are speed and range. If the Herc replacement can attain speeds and range nearer the 757, then what is the need for it? It needs ground support, cannot do rough field ops and is limited in the gear which can be loaded with its high side door and small cross section, hardly ideal for emergency relief ops which form a major part of what the RNZAF does. It only really leaves the role of being a political shuttle, not a good use of a very stretched budget. And correct, neither is replacing the Skyhwak for demos a strong argument :white:

If the Herc and 757 roles can be bundled into one, it would probably be beneficial for operations. Especially if it allows for a smaller transport to slot in for the short-range work.
 
Max Q
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:00 am

Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one
type

They are built for two totally different purposes


C130 J and the 788 is the answer here
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:27 am

Max Q wrote:
Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one
type

They are built for two totally different purposes

It is NZ we are talking about, they aren't storming around the Pacific bringing wayward tropical islands into line.


Max Q wrote:
C130 J and the 788 is the answer here

The C-130J is a good possibility given NZ already have a fleet of Hercs but not sure why the 788.

The NZ 757s had the following modifications,
Install a cargo door
Reconfigure the cabin interior for an 11 freight pallet capability
Install a cargo handling system able to accommodate numerous cabin configurations
Provide a VIP and AME capability
Install air stairs and crew access ladder
Upgrade aircraft communications and navigation systems
Install a package of military communications and cabin LAN equipment
Install a package of cabin noise-reduction features
Engine thrust upgrade.

http://www.airforce.mil.nz/projects/boeing757.htm

Given none of that is available for the 787 family I don't see it as an option for NZ. The A330 MRTT would be a better fit if NZ really want another commercial airlifter that encompasses the roles the 757 is used for, problem being the A330 is probably too big.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:33 pm

The only thing the C-2 doesn't do out of the box is the passenger/ministerial transport bit. And that can either be a limitation accepted by the NZ government or they could always buy a single different aircraft to fulfill that role.
 
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bikerthai
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:40 pm

Ozair wrote:
problem being the A330 is probably too big.


If the A330 is too big, then they can go for the 767-200C. That plane will have provision for a military transport without the boom attached.
The C-40 is also available but that may be too small.

bt
Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
 
mxaxai
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:59 pm

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
The only thing the C-2 doesn't do out of the box is the passenger/ministerial transport bit. And that can either be a limitation accepted by the NZ government or they could always buy a single different aircraft to fulfill that role.

I would assume they could also go the way of many other governments and charter a commercial aircraft for the few situations where the need arises. Another option would be a BBJ/ACJ style transport dedicated for that role, which is again a choice many smaller countries made.
Ozair wrote:
Max Q wrote:
Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one
type

They are built for two totally different purposes

It is NZ we are talking about, they aren't storming around the Pacific bringing wayward tropical islands into line.
Max Q wrote:
C130 J and the 788 is the answer here

The C-130J is a good possibility given NZ already have a fleet of Hercs but not sure why the 788.

I'm not sure how good the C-130 is for trips to Antarctica and the ranges the pacific demands. But at the same time, the C-130's rough field & STOL capability makes them unreplaceable for missions like disaster relief. Perhaps the A400M's capability would be satisfactory for NZ but probably not (should they choose to go for a single type). Agree that the 787 is not an option.
 
Max Q
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:59 am

Ozair wrote:
Max Q wrote:
Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one
type

They are built for two totally different purposes

It is NZ we are talking about, they aren't storming around the Pacific bringing wayward tropical islands into line.


Max Q wrote:
C130 J and the 788 is the answer here

The C-130J is a good possibility given NZ already have a fleet of Hercs but not sure why the 788.

The NZ 757s had the following modifications,
Install a cargo door
Reconfigure the cabin interior for an 11 freight pallet capability
Install a cargo handling system able to accommodate numerous cabin configurations
Provide a VIP and AME capability
Install air stairs and crew access ladder
Upgrade aircraft communications and navigation systems
Install a package of military communications and cabin LAN equipment
Install a package of cabin noise-reduction features
Engine thrust upgrade.

http://www.airforce.mil.nz/projects/boeing757.htm

Given none of that is available for the 787 family I don't see it as an option for NZ. The A330 MRTT would be a better fit if NZ really want another commercial airlifter that encompasses the roles the 757 is used for, problem being the A330 is probably too big.



Interesting, I didn’t realize these 757’s had
been so extensively modified


It’s hard to tell from the picture but it looks
like the built in airstairs are incorporated into the right rear door which is unusual
as these are normally installed on L1 or 2


And where is this ‘crew access ladder’
installed and what is it exactly?
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:15 am

Max Q wrote:
Ozair wrote:
Max Q wrote:
Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one
type

They are built for two totally different purposes

It is NZ we are talking about, they aren't storming around the Pacific bringing wayward tropical islands into line.


Max Q wrote:
C130 J and the 788 is the answer here

The C-130J is a good possibility given NZ already have a fleet of Hercs but not sure why the 788.

The NZ 757s had the following modifications,
Install a cargo door
Reconfigure the cabin interior for an 11 freight pallet capability
Install a cargo handling system able to accommodate numerous cabin configurations
Provide a VIP and AME capability
Install air stairs and crew access ladder
Upgrade aircraft communications and navigation systems
Install a package of military communications and cabin LAN equipment
Install a package of cabin noise-reduction features
Engine thrust upgrade.

http://www.airforce.mil.nz/projects/boeing757.htm

Given none of that is available for the 787 family I don't see it as an option for NZ. The A330 MRTT would be a better fit if NZ really want another commercial airlifter that encompasses the roles the 757 is used for, problem being the A330 is probably too big.



Interesting, I didn’t realize these 757’s had
been so extensively modified


It’s hard to tell from the picture but it looks
like the built in airstairs are incorporated into the right rear door which is unusual
as these are normally installed on L1 or 2


And where is this ‘crew access ladder’
installed and what is it exactly?


I believe it's just a folding ladder that can be deployed from the L1 door or cargo door. As to what it's for, well, what it says on the tin. Lets the crew get on and off without any ground equipment needed.

Personally right now I'd say the C-2 is the frontrunner for the RNZAF C-130 replacement. The lack of austere capability is a loss, but not a huge one in my eye. Especially as helicopters and UAVs improve. The main competition will come from the Embraer KC-390. If the Japanese government thrown in some P-1s at cost then that could make a difference.

The biggest capability requirement I see is being able to do CHC to Antarctica with no point of no return and a reasonable payload.
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:59 am

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:

The biggest capability requirement I see is being able to do CHC to Antarctica with no point of no return and a reasonable payload.

The 757s have that capability and the C-2 will carry a larger payload further so it shouldn't have a problem. Might not be as comfortable for passangers as the 757 but that is minor, given whoever is going will be living hard for the next few months anyway or leaving and happy to get out of there...

Some info on NZ antarctic flights,

After carrying almost 6000 passengers and 2.5 million lbs of cargo to McMurdo Base the RNZAF Boeing 757 has made the last Antarctic flight of the season.

The total weight of cargo and people moved this season is more than 5 million lbs. It’s a massive joint operation between the US and New Zealand to provide airlift services to the Antarctic.

The US provides C-17 and LC-130 ski-equipped Hercules and New Zealand provides C-130, P3 and B757 aircraft, which land and take off without skis, to transport freight and passengers to the Antarctica.

The biggest risk for Antarctic flying is the remoteness. The weather is extremely changeable and can make the journey extremely difficult. Speed is essential in getting all passengers loaded and away as quickly as possible as the weather can change dramatically on the ice.

There is a strict criteria for aircraft serviceability and how to deal with malfunctions in remote areas. The B757 doesn’t have enough fuel to go to the Antarctic and return to New Zealand without refuelling. As the flight one way is approximately four and a half hours, the ‘point of safe return’ is three hours into the journey. After that point, if the weather deteriorates, or the aircraft malfunctions, the aircraft can only proceed South. It can’t turn back.

The B757 can take up to 156 military and civilian passengers including scientists and researchers heading to the base for research purposes and carries everything needed to make a Base work, such as chefs, cleaners, electricians, construction workers and operations staff to help build and maintain the facilities at Antarctica.

http://www.nzdf.mil.nz/news/feature-sto ... he-ice.htm
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:09 am

Ummmmm, the 757s and C-130s do not have the capability to do an Antarctica trip with no point of no return. As the highlighted point of your quote says.

This came to a head for the previous government when it nearly lost a 757 with a senior government minister on board as the weather became terrible after the 757 had passed the point of no return.

I'm sure the C-2 will be capable of doing CHC-Antarctica with no point of no return. My wondering is more can it do that while carrying a useful payload. It is worth noting that the new fleet supply ship for the RNZN will be ice strengthend explicitly so it can do supply runs during the summer. This may lighten any requirement for heavy payload requirements.
 
mats01776
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:32 am

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
Ummmmm, the 757s and C-130s do not have the capability to do an Antarctica trip with no point of no return. As the highlighted point of your quote says.

If I am not mistaken, both C-130 and C-2 have the in-flight refueling capability.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:54 am

mats01776 wrote:
ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
Ummmmm, the 757s and C-130s do not have the capability to do an Antarctica trip with no point of no return. As the highlighted point of your quote says.

If I am not mistaken, both C-130 and C-2 have the in-flight refueling capability.


RNZAF C-130s don't. And that also assumes in the future the NZ government have the RNZAF build that capability and maintain it. Which does not come for free and there is really only one mission the RNZAF do that would need it.
 
Kiwirob
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:59 am

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:

I'm sure the C-2 will be capable of doing CHC-Antarctica with no point of no return. My wondering is more can it do that while carrying a useful payload. It is worth noting that the new fleet supply ship for the RNZN will be ice strengthend explicitly so it can do supply runs during the summer. This may lighten any requirement for heavy payload requirements.


New new supply vessels ability to resupply Antarctica is a bit of a stretch, she can carry 12 containers, the current vessel supporting the NZ and US bases carries hundreds of containers. She would have to make dozens of trips to lift what one supply run using the existing vessel does.

Image
 
Ozair
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:15 pm

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
Ummmmm, the 757s and C-130s do not have the capability to do an Antarctica trip with no point of no return. As the highlighted point of your quote says.

Sorry, I wasn't clear. What I was inferring was that the 757s fly to Antarctica and the C-2 would be able to as well. The respective payload would significantly impact whether the C-2 had a point of no return but I'm not sure that really matters that much. I appreciate the potential issue that an NZ minister had but there are few military transports within the budget of NZ that would offer that point of no return, unless NZ did go for an A330 or similar sized widebody, which as discussed is doubtful.
 
ZKNCI
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:58 pm

Max Q wrote:
Can’t really see how you can replace the 757 and C130 with one type
They are built for two totally different purposes
C130 J and the 788 is the answer here

Well, I have to say, I'm picturing the response on the Civ Av forum to the notion that the ideal 757 replacement is a military airlifter! :D
It's not really a case of what they were designed for, but what is needed. The 757 provides speed and range over the Herc, useful for getting about the Pacific, but is more constrained in terms of loading with the side door and cross-section, need for support gear and a prepared field. If the C-130 replacement comes with the range and speed of the 757 (which the C-2 seems to bring), allowing for heavy gear such as vehicles and helos to be moved anywhere needed, does a direct 757 replacement have sufficient benefit given NZ does not have a particularly large budget and a significant portion of the RNZAF fleet needs to be replaced? A 788 mostly be a political bus.
Probably more useful would be a smaller tactical lifter to slot below whatever replaces the Hercs, to take over lifts which do not justify the larger aircraft, training and coastal SAR/patrol. Many in the general public remember the loss of the Combat Strike Wing in 2001, but few think of the Andovers (retired 1998) or F27s (retired 1992).

mxaxai wrote:
I'm not sure how good the C-130 is for trips to Antarctica and the ranges the pacific demands. But at the same time, the C-130's rough field & STOL capability makes them unreplaceable for missions like disaster relief.

The H-Hercs have been a great asset for the past 53 years and show a Herc can do it, but there are limitations. The point of no return to Antarctica is a big one, and while they have been operated to Antarctica for many years with this, the ability to avoid such a safety issue is desirable. An aircraft like the C-2 also means getting over that patch of water a bit faster.

Ozair wrote:
The 757s have that capability

Negative, point of no return still exists

mats01776 wrote:
If I am not mistaken, both C-130 and C-2 have the in-flight refueling capability

Not on the RNZAF's current Hercs, which include the first H-model built, but the potential replacements do indeed have that option. Would need to borrow an RAAF KC-30 though, as the RNZAF hasn't been able to air-refuel anything since the Skyhawks. If the C-2 can make it without refuelling, perfect.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:02 pm

I think what the Minister thing brought to the attention of the government was the very real risk they could lose a transport and its crew and any passengers. The reaction in NZ to something like that would not be good. Especially if it was reasonably avoidable. And after thinking about it for a bit I do think it's possible the NZ government could go for a C-2 replacement with a single A330 MRTT without the refueling equipment. As Australia also operates the type we could take advantage for some lower ongoing costs.

Anyways, that's really all up in the air until the release an RFP that contains the must have requirements. After that's out then we can really start to guess.
 
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Dutchy
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:48 pm

Ozair wrote:
Image


That's a hell of a clean cockpit. Well done!
Many happy landings, greetings from The Netherlands!
 
Max Q
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Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:02 am

So clean there’s no left seat installed !


Looks like a mock up
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
 
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brianK73
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Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2016 1:47 pm

Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:25 am

 
Ozair
Topic Author
Posts: 2180
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 8:38 am

Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:53 am

brianK73 wrote:
Found this photo:

Thanks, some interesting changes between the two such as the HUD similar to the C-130J.
 
Max Q
Posts: 6079
Joined: Wed May 09, 2001 12:40 pm

Re: Kawasaki C-2 news, prospects and discussion

Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:25 pm

That’s a very nice looking cockpit, although a little ‘busy’ on the glare shield directly in front of the Pilots
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.

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