ryu2
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Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:12 pm

A very large number of airliners.net users seem to speak English as their second (or greater) language, and generally speak it quite well, I think. I know that if I tried to speak, say, French or German in France or Germany, it would be nowhere as good!

So for all those growing up in a non-English speaking country:

How did you learn English?

Is English required in your country's schools, and if so, at what age?

Do you "learn" a lot of English by yourself, from English media like movies, books, web sites, or is it all from school, textbooks, etc.

Do you find reading airliners.net or another English web site/book/etc. difficult at all -- do you need to "translate" mentally at all, or is it very natural.

Do you feel that it's right to be using English as a universal language, or would you rather use your native language?

I'm very interested in hearing some of your perspective on this subject.
 
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mighluss
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:25 pm

I'm from Spain, and I learned english in the primary school, but if I speak english is because I'm using it everyday here, in my work, etc.
I don't translate when I read english, I do it naturally, but sometimes is difficult for me, reading something, or writting...(you can see here...).
Now I 'm studying German, and it will be my 4th. language, because in Barcelona (Catalonia), we have two native languages, but after all you are right, english is the universal language now, here, and everywhere.
Miquel.
 
carmy
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:36 pm

Well here in Singapore where I live, everyone learns English as their first language. A large number of Singaporeans speak English at home, and hardly anyone has any problems writing in perfect English. All road signs, notices, letters, are written in English. We've a total of four or five English newspapers, and five English television channels on free to air television. Medium of instruction in all schools is English, and all official documents are written in English. By the way, only British English is used.  Wink/being sarcastic

Besides learning English, all students must learn the language of their ancestry, which for most people in the country is either Mandarin, Malay or Tamil. The country prides itself in being effectively bilingual, where a large proportion of the population have absolutely no problem switching between English and their mother tongue. To further enhance Singaporeans' ability to communicate with the world, the top ten percent of all students graduating from primary school are given the option of taking a third language, which the government offers free of charge. This is to ensure that Singapore will never be hampered anywhere because of language difficulties.

We sit for the same Cambridge O and A level examinations as Great Britain and many other Commonwealth countries, and Singaporean students have continually done well in these examinations, primarily because of their ability to write in flawless English coloured with a unique Far Eastern perspective of world affairs.

Most Singaporeans have no problem with English as the universal language. Their ability to speak flawless English is an advantage which they have over many of their Asia peers. And with Asia fast rising in every way, we view the ability to switch from one language to another flawlessly as an asset.

I don't think anyone in Singapore has any problems reading in English. In fact, many younger Singaporeans may prefer to speak in their native tongues, but writing and reading in English comes more naturally than writing in their native tongue.
 
docpepz
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:44 pm

I second what carmy says. I speak and write English more effectively and naturally than my native tongue, which is either Tamil or Chinese. I hated Chinese lessons in school.

Actually English, to me, is my native language. Chinese is foreign and strange as far as I'm concerned.

 
Soren-a
Posts: 223
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:46 pm

Hi

Here in Denmark English is taught from the 5th grade if I remeber correct (It has been awhile since I was in the 5th grade) and all the way up to the 2nd or 3rd year of high school.

All movies and TV shows on English has danish sub-titles which means that you can pick up quite a lot of English from watching TV (how said TV made you stupid??  Wink/being sarcastic).

Personally I dont find it difficult to read, write or speak English anymore, but as with everything else it was difficult in the beginning, but when you are exposed to english in some form every day you quickly pick it up, and I don't have to "translate" it in my head.

As far as English being the universal language it is ok with me (it would also be a bit hard to change it now  Smile/happy/getting dizzy). I would of couse prefer that the hole world spoke Danish, but I know that will never happen, since we use letters that pretty much no one else does (æ, ø and å), and therefore have not chance of pronauncing (I have yet to meet a non-danish speaking person that can say my name right Wink/being sarcastic).

Regards
Søren Augustesen
 
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mighluss
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 8:55 pm

Soren, one question:

Is danish, or other nordic languages similar to German?
Miquel.
 
ryu2
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:00 pm

Interesting -- my ethnicity is Chinese, and I've spend a lot of time in China and Taiwan, and I can speak, read and write Mandarin well, but forget about any European language -- simply because I have no chance to use it!

Yeah, I agree about Singapore -- I have some relatives there, and so I visit there regularly.

Its interesting seeing the diverse cultures using English as their common language, and at the same time, keeping their own language and culture alive.

At the same time, Singlish is pretty interesting.  Smile My Singaporean friends speak perfect English outside of Singapore, like in the US, but revert to Singlish back in Singapore.

 
Soren-a
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2001 10:13 pm

Mighluss

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:06 pm

Hi

In my opinion Danish and German is not at all similar to German (there might be some similarity in the origin of the words). The succession of words in a sentence is very different. In danish schools Gernam is also taught (from the 7th or 8th grade), but most students find it much more diffucult than English (some even choose to learn FRENCH instead!!!  Wink/being sarcastic).

Danish, Norweigan and Swedish are very similar.
Finnish if very different from dansih, swedish and norweigian, but it might be similar to german although I would guess that it is more like russian (Is the a Finn on a.net that can clarifiy this??).

Regards
Søren Augustesen
 
9V-SVE
Posts: 1953
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:20 pm

Like Docpepz, I hate my native tougue! Chinese! Oh and ya our family doesn't like Singlish, except Me and my brother la. Big grin

By The Way, Carmy, Not everyone uses Brit's English la. Big grin

 
airsicknessbag
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:26 pm


Q: How did you learn English?
A: school (6 years), CNN, USAToday/IHT, books, travel, living in Ireland for a while.

Q: Is English required in your country's schools, and if so, at what age?
A: My country being Germany, you´re required to take English courses from ages 10-15, 10-16, 10-19, 12-16 or 12-19, depending on the type of secondary school you attend.

Q: Do you "learn" a lot of English by yourself, from English media like movies, books, web sites, or is it all from school, textbooks, etc.
A: Well, I wouldn´t call it "learning" any more, but I use it in everyday life.

Q: Do you find reading airliners.net or another English web site/book/etc. difficult at all -- do you need to "translate" mentally at all, or is it very natural.
A: I don´t find it difficult at all. And I don´t translate it, that would be way too clumsy.

Q: Do you feel that it's right to be using English as a universal language, or would you rather use your native language?
A: Uhh, I believe this is not a question of right or wrong, but rather convenience. English is THE universal language, I´m glad it is, rather than, say, Hindi - because English is very easy to learn for German native speakers, due to the two languages´ similarities.


Daniel Smile


 
Jetboy
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:35 pm

Actually Finnish is not related to Russian or German. Finnish belongs to the Finno-Hungaric language group and is vaguely related to hungarian.

As far as Danish, Swedish and Norweigian go, to my understanding they belong to the germanic language group and are infact related to german.

And for the questions, i started learnin english when i was in kindergarten and continued studying it in elementary and high school, so that hoe i learned it.
My mother tongue is finnish, but english is almost equally strong, soi have no difficulties in english.

Officialy my school thought finniah as the second language..on 5th garade we were introduced to swedish, 8th grade i chose french and in High School spanish and italian  Smile

cheers jetboy
 
Guest

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:53 pm


In Germany you usually start to learn English in fifth grade and continue it until you graduate which depends on the kind of school you attend. I myself have learned English for 9 years now and it's fun to use it. Actually I'm using it everyday (Internet, CNN, Newsweek, ...)

I don't find it difficult to read it here on airliners.net. Occassionally I look up a word or two when I'm curious to know what it exactly means but otherwise not.

Rgds,
B737-700
 
matt86
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 9:57 pm

I'm learning English in school for 7 years now. It was my first foreign language, the second is French (but I hate it...) English is taught in the 5th grade (sometimes in the 7th or 3rd grade) until school ends. One can learn and use english in the internet, on tv, radio, computer and of course in english-speaking countries. I don't find it hard to understand english, but sometimes there are words which I don't understand or someone is talking in an english dialect. English is naturally for me. I think it's the Universal Language and everybody should be able to speak and understand it.
 
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sebolino
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 10:04 pm

In France, we have to learn 2 foreign languages. Mainly English, German, Spanish.
But school is not the best place to learn to speak fluently with native English speakers.

I learned the most of what I say in Denmark or in France with a Danish Friend. I had some vocabulary from the school, and I could improve my skills with Internet and English or American TV.

The records were important also. Listening to Deep Purple was good, as well as Iron Maiden and many others...
(Cannibal Corpse is less helpful, cos' you don't hear what they say, even if you understand what they mean  Smile/happy/getting dizzy ).
 
airsicknessbag
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 10:10 pm

Oh, and by the way, English was my third language: I started learning Latin at school two years before I started English. A very sensible approach, because Latin helps so much in understanding languages´ grammatical structures. Plus it helps you with lots of words of the Roman or Roman influenced languages like Italian, English, French, Spanish...

Daniel Smile
 
Turbolet
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 10:42 pm

Hmm... interesting thread.
I live in Malta, but my parents are Czech. Malta has English as the second official language, and to me English has become my first language. I speak Czech as well and basic Maltese, but I find that there are many expressions in English I want to use even when talking Czech at home. In the end, I usually just say it in English.
I speak English most of the day, read English only apart from exceptions and spend a lot of time on chat and discussions, where English is basically the only language spoken. I think I have a richer vocabulary in English than any of the other languages I can speak.
-turbolet
 
Banco
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 10:47 pm

I might ask for this thread to be deleted because you are making me feel ever so ashamed! Big grin

Good on all of you, no matter where you learnt the language.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
carmy
Posts: 590
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 10:55 pm

9V-SVE: Everyone uses British English in Singapore. All official buildings with the word Centre in it is spelled Centre, not Center. All our newspapers spell in British English. All our television stations spell in British English when they've got subtitles. All official government documents are written in British English. All our textbooks up to junior college is in British English. We sit for the Cambridge GCE 'O' and 'A' level papers, which is all in British English.

Bottom line. Everyone uses British English. Period.  Big thumbs up
 
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mighluss
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 11:03 pm

It's interesting to see that there are lots of countries using english more than their native language, here in Spain lots of people don't know to speak english, or very few...(I don't speak it perfect at all)...well, Spanish is one of the most used languages too!
Miquel.
 
carmy
Posts: 590
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 11:04 pm

Actually, Chinese is the world's most commonly spoken language, and the language with the most number of native speakers, i.e. people of Chinese descent.
 
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mighluss
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 11:07 pm

2nd: English.
3rd: Spanish.

(I think...)
Miquel.
 
docpepz
Posts: 1706
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Tue Nov 20, 2001 11:48 pm

If any of you want to learn Singlish, just visit

http://www.talkingcock.com

 
Gdabski
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2001 8:17 pm

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 12:37 am

Q:How did you learn English?
A: Watching TV

Q:Is English required in your country's schools, and if so, at what age?
A: In Poland you have to learn your first foreign language (in most cases it's English but sometimes you have German, French or even Russian) from the age of 10 but in some schools you have English lessons from the age of 7. A second foreign language may be introduced when you are 13 and has to be introduced at the age of 16.

Q: Do you "learn" a lot of English by yourself, from English media like movies, books, web sites, or is it all from school, textbooks, etc.
A: Because of small salaries the teachers are poor so most of the students take additional foreign language lessons. As for me I think that English media are a good way to broaden your voacabulary.

Q: Do you find reading airliners.net or another English web site/book/etc. difficult at all -- do you need to "translate" mentally at all, or is it very natural.
A: It's very natural for me to read in English but sometimes I have problems with gramatics and spelling when I have to write or say something.

And this was probably my longest post on a.net Confused

Regards,
Gdabski
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 1:15 am

But very well written.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
petertenthije
Posts: 3308
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2001 10:00 pm

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 1:59 am

Q: How did you learn English?
A: I learned it at school. It started when I was 13 and I have had it ever since. I am now 20 and therefore have had 7 years of English at school. I will have at least 2 years of English to go. Since recently I am in an international class, were we off course all speak English as well.
I also learned it from TV. Programmes in Holland are subtitle, so you constantly hear English. In other countries, for instance Germany and France, the text is changed into German/French. They therefore have less experience in English, but more fun. Ever heard a Cowboy or Winston Churchill speak German or French?
Next to that I also read a lot of English magazines and books (AirlinerWorld, Air Forces Monthly etc) and read English on the internet.

Q: Is English required in your country's schools, and if so, at what age?
A: In Holland English is required from about your 13th to your 16th/17th. All depends on your education level. Students on higher educational levels usually have to follow English (depending on what you study, law for instance has no use for English).
German is required for at least one year, but I have had it for 5. I have had French for 3 years. That is not required by law, but at some schools it is. Unfortunately it was required by my school. I am very bad at French.

Q: Do you find reading airliners.net or another English website/book/etc. difficult at all -- do you need to "translate" mentally at all, or is it very natural.
A: Not at all, it goes very natural. That is also the reason why I was allowed at the international class.

Q: Do you feel that it's right to be using English as a universal language, or would you rather use your native language?
A: Off course my own language is easier, but it is my understanding that not too many people speak Dutch. I do not expect the world to learn Dutch; there just aren't that many Dutch speaking people.
I am just glad the number one language is English and not Russian or Chinese. Those languages are also spoken a lot. BTW, English is not the only "world" language. In the Balkans there are more people speaking German then there are speaking English. And in the CIS more people speak Russian than English.
Attamottamotta!
 
Hepkat
Posts: 2134
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2000 8:22 am

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 6:48 am

Actually Soren-a & Mighluss, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch and English are all Germanic languages, i.e., they are all descendents of some old German language. They share common structures, and when you examine many of the words, you'll see how a vowel changed here, a syllable changed there, resulting in a different word. For example, English - Day/Night, German - Tag/Nacht, Dutch - Dag/Nacht, Danish - Dag/Nat, Swedish - Dag/Natt, Norwegian - Dag/Natt

Living here in Vienna, I speak German, and was really surprised when travelling through Scandinavia how much I could read. I couldn't understand the spoken languages, but when written they all made sense, and you could see the strong similarities. Similarly, the other day I was browsing through my satellite channels, and found some channel with something interesting. At first I thought it was some German dialect, as I could understand only about half of what they were saying. Then I saw some text on the screen and realized it was Dutch!

I guess being an American I am priviledged as far as languages go as everyone, everywhere is trying to learn English. People are always interested in me when they hear me speak English, some people are just dying to say a few words just to try out their English. The disadvantage, of course, is that in the U.S. we are pretty much dumb when it comes to foreign languages.
 
Soren-a
Posts: 223
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RE: Hepkat

Wed Nov 21, 2001 6:17 pm

Hi Hepkat

Thanks for the info about the languages - you learn something new every day Smile

Regards
Søren Augustesen
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 6:43 pm

It's interesting that all the English speaking countries share a common uselessness when it comes to learning languages. In the UK we are constantly berated (by ourselves) for our monolinguistic capabilities, but it seems common to the US, Australia, Canada, New Zealand etc.

I vaguely remember hearing that there was in move in Holland (where everybody speaks superb English!) to have English installed as a second official language. Can anyone verify or deny this?
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
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sebolino
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 6:50 pm

The funny thing with English: It's true that it's a Germanic language like German or Danish.
At the opposite French, Spanish, Italian are Latin.
But half the words (perhaps not exactly) in English come from old French !
 
Banco
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:20 pm

Well, Norman French and real French drifted apart over a couple of hundred years. Norman French was infused with the Anglo Saxon spoken by the majority of the population. As a result English as we now know it became a separate language from a mixture of the two. But Norman French was the high language, and Anglo Saxon the low. This is why you get "go" (Anglo-Saxon) and "proceed" (Norman-French q.v. Latin) as examples of the two.

Norman French as it was in England was laughed at anyway by the supposedly more cultured French and the language developed apace as a single entity since there was no movement to keep it separate and distinct. A good example of the divergence was in accent. All the Latin based languages use "q" for the their interrogatives, e.g. qui, qua etc, whilst English uses "wh" e.g. when, why. If the harden the "wh" sound you can see the common link.

Because the new merged English was a peripheral language at that time (power was held in France, Spain and Italy) it was never written down - Latin was used instead in documents. As a result, the people happily lopped off all the endings to words they didn't like to simplify it - which is why there is no gender, and verbs are often the same regardless of tense.

Of course, this meant that when English eventually was written down, there were no usable rules to govern it, and this remains true to this day, regardless of various attempts to "Latinise" the rules e.g split infinitives etc.

The people of the middle ages would be utterly horrified to see that the bastard language of the time has risen to pre-eminence, but although it is a historical accident from empire, it should be remembered that English, as the fusion of multiple languages, has become absolutely vast. English has ten times the vocabulary of French, and three times that of German.

Hope you find that interesting!
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
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sebolino
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:30 pm

>>English has ten times the vocabulary of French, and three >>times that of German.

Interesting !!!

I don't feel that I have difficulties to express myself in French with this low vocabulary !!
 
Banco
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:35 pm

I don't think so either. But remember that regardless of how large a language's full vocabulary is, most people actually only know a few thousand words. This is true of any language. It's just that in English, native speakers know a smaller percentage of the total available!

But a clear indicator of how large the full language can be is that English is (to my knowledge) the only language that requires a thesaurus for synonyms and antinyms.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
docpepz
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:37 pm

A funny thing happened when my family and I were in France. We needed to get to rue de la something so my dad wound down the window and asked this gentleman in very broken English how to get to that place.

"You know how get to RUE... DE... LA ....(whatever) ?"
The guy stared back blankly.

In desperation, my dad used sign language (though it never EVER helps) and more clipped broken English.

I mean, what's the point of using proper English in proper sentences when you're in rural France, since chances are no one would understand you right?

Then the guy went, in his best British accent:

"Do you speak English?"

That was a godsend man! And we were like "yes yes yes we do we do!!!!" And he gave us clear instructions on how to get to rue de la whatever.

So we thought we were in France and no one would speak English and that guy probably thought we were some non-English speaking Asians.....hahhahahahahaha

When I'm in non-English speaking countries like those in continental Europe or certain South East Asian ones, I notice many Americans and Britons using flawless English to communicate with the natives, who are more often than not completely oblivious as to what they're saying. I always wonder why they do that, since for me, when I'm speaking to someone who can't speak English, I speak real slowly in broken sentences to get the main idea across. It usually works better.
 
docpepz
Posts: 1706
Joined: Thu May 24, 2001 8:20 pm

Hong Kongers

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:45 pm

I've always been puzzled as to how the average Hongkonger doesn't speak that much English. I mean, The British were there fore 156 years! WHy didn't they impart the language to the people?

Here in Singapore, the British left 35 years ago but we speak more English than ever. English is more widely spoken here than any other country in Asia. When the Brits were here, they never made English education compulsory and allowed for Chinese-medium schools. When they left, the govt abolished all Chinese-medium schools and made the entire education system English-based, with Cambridge being the sole authority for major exams students take when they're 16 and 18 years old respectively ( O levels and A levels)

As a result, a generation of Singaporeans (like myself)have grown up hating their own native language, preferring to speak English instead. We're more British than the British, aren't we?
 
petertenthije
Posts: 3308
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2001 10:00 pm

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:57 pm

By my knowledge English has never been considered as an official second language in Holland. Fries is an official language in Holland though. It is spoken in the Northeast of Holland and in the Southwest of Germany. It is a mixture of the Dutch, German, Danish and the Scandinavian languages.
Attamottamotta!
 
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sebolino
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 10:23 pm

We have dictionaries of synonyms in French.
 
carmy
Posts: 590
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2001 12:00 am

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:04 pm

Yah, why is it that a large proportion of Hong Kongers still have difficulty speaking English even though Great Britain has been administering them for years and years? Rather odd since in most Commonwealth countries like Malaysia, India and so on, English is relatively widely spoken.
 
airsicknessbag
Posts: 4626
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RE: Peterthentije

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:16 pm

>>>Fries
is an official language in Holland though. It is spoken in the Northeast of Holland and in the Southwest
of Germany. It is a mixture of the Dutch, German, Danish and the Scandinavian languages.

That´s right (it´s the German NORTHwest, though) - the Frisians, Danish and Sorbs are the three ethnic minorities of Germany. Their languages are not official languages of Germany but they do enjoy some sort of legal protection.

Daniel Smile
 
Banco
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RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:30 pm

Sebolino - If that's the case, then I stand corrected.

Airsicknessbag - You also have the slightly bizarre (to outsiders) sight of the British Government spending quite serious amounts of money on ensuring English didn't completely push out another language in the UK, namely Welsh. If you go back about 30 years Welsh was almost a dead language - English had taken over in all but a very few pockets. Now, Welsh is thriving, bringing with it the usual problems and discord between English and Welsh speakers! Note that only a minority of Welsh people speak Welsh.


Even so, I think credit where it is due, Welsh probably would have died out without help. A remarkably enlightened policy.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
Rickster
Posts: 648
Joined: Tue Dec 19, 2000 10:47 pm

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:42 pm

I started with english at school at the age of 8 until 19 with more ore less good education. Unfortunately my grandparents from both sides never tought me czech or hungarian as their native language. Presently the second language spoken here by natives besides German is Turkish. Well and that German wich Austrians use to speak has nothing to do with the German teached in schools and for eastern Austrians it´s very difficult to communicate with western Austrians.
Regards
 
Alessandro
Posts: 4962
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2001 3:13 am

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:56 pm

Swedes start at 8 years of age to learn english. Swedish
have many similarities with english, all TV channel use
subtitles when they show english speaking program.
BTW my favorite accent is Canadian....
From New Yorqatar to Califarbia...
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 11:56 pm

RE: Learning English As A Second Language

Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:58 pm

And we've got Sven!!!! Big grin
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.

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Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos