Arsenal@LHR
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British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:18 am

Amazing to see that one language can be so diverse but all words having the same meaning.

Some example:

The AA, the RAC:
AAA ('Triple A') American Automobile Association.

Abattoir:
Slaughterhouse

Abseiling:
Rappeling

Abroad:
Overseas
("Jan just got back from an overseas tour with the Army")

Accelerator:
Gas Pedal

Advert (TV):
Commercial

A&E, Casualty:
ER (emergency room)

Aerial:
Antenna

Alsatian:
German Shepherd (as it should be)

"All Right?" (Greeting):
'What's up?','How's it Going?'

Amber (on Traffic Lights):
Yellow

America:
The States.
Americans only formally refer to their country as 'America,' and usually (commonly) refer to it as 'the States.'

Ante-Natal:
Pre-Natal

Anti-Clockwise:
Counter-Clockwise

Articulated Lorry:
'Semi,' Semi-Tractor Trailer, 'Big Rig,' '18-Wheeler'

Arse:
Ass

Aubergine:
Eggplant

Autumn:
Fall

-B-

Back Bacon:
Canadian Bacon

Balaclava:
Ski Mask

Bank of England, the Exchequer:
Department of the Treasury

Bank Holiday:
National Holiday

Bap, Cob (for beefburgers):
Hamburger Bun

Barrister:
Trial Lawyer

Beefburger:
Hamburger
("I'll have a hamburger, fries and a Mountain Dew to go")

Benefits:
Welfare

Bespoke:
Tailor-Made

Big Wheel:
Ferris Wheel

Bin:
Wastebasket, Garbage can, Trash can

Bin Liner:
Garbage, Trash bag

Biscuit Barrel:
Cookie Jar

Biscuits:
Cookies

Blancmange:
Pudding

Bleeper:
Beeper

Bloke, Chap, Lad:
Man, Guy

http://www.travelfurther.net/dictionaries/ba-ac.htm

Rdgs
Arsenal@LHR
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roguetrader
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:27 am

pissed = drunk in UK
pissed = angry in USA

loo/toilet in UK
bathroom/restroom/mens room/ladies room in USA
(toilet has a slightly rude or vulgar meaning in USA)

shorts = men's underwear ( I think?)
shorts = short pants, worn in summer

scheme = plan or program in UK
scheme = illegal or devious plan or program in USA

kind regards,

RogueTrader



 
Arsenal@LHR
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:30 am

Can we assume which one is the "correct" english? For example should we say "Motorway" or "Highway". I dont think neither is wrong, just which one is more suitable to what we're describing.

rdgs
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Hepkat
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:34 am

I believe English has the most words of any other language. I've forgotten the exact figure, which increases everyday, but I think it's somewhere around 100,000, can anyone verify that?

This is especially confusing to English speakers, who for every concept there exists a dozen words to describe it. Compare this to a language like French, which has much less words, and is therefore much more direct.
 
Arsenal@LHR
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:39 am

What about the english spoken in Canada? Is it the same as the english spoken in the US?

Arsenal@LHR
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roguetrader
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:45 am

Sooner or later, through tv and the internet, probably all of these differences will be eliminated eventually. Canada uses pretty much the same words as American English, although they have a few accents and expressions, like 'eh?'

The interesting thing, I think, is that you can usually tell what the other speaker is talking about even if you don't already know about the differences.

For instance, what Brits call a 'nappy' (the thing that infants wear before they're toilet trained) Americans call a 'diaper'. The word 'nappy' would otherwise have no meaning to an American. However, when you hear it used, 'nappy' just sounds like it could be a name for a diaper. Kind of like napkin, maybe. We kind of intuitively know what is being talked about.

kind regards,

RogueTrader
 
Arsenal@LHR
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 5:59 am

Car = Automobile
Drink = Soda

Although car is commonly used in the US just as everywhere.

In Arsene we trust!!
 
JetService
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 6:07 am

US: Fries
UK: Chips

US: Chips
UK: Crisps

US: Pass (on the freeway)
UK: Overtake

"Shaddap you!"
 
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yyz717
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 6:17 am

I can see perhaps North American English becoming somewhat 'homogenized' within itself over time with the prolif of the internet & movement of people etc, but I don't see the variety & difference of slang terms & idioms betw American English & the Queen's English declining.....the US/Canada & the UK each have the critical mass & the geographic divide to remain distinct branches of English, so to speak.

IMHO.

I dumped at the gybe mark in strong winds when I looked up at a Porter Q400 on finals. Can't stop spotting.
 
KLM-MD11
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 6:47 am

o.k.

how 'bout this one:

UK: tomato
US: tomato

just kidding : )
GELUK IS GELUL MET EEN K
 
Yazoo
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 6:49 am

what's "kiss my ass" in british ? Big grin kiss me bottom ?
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blink182
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 6:57 am

Yes, there are differences, but Having been to the UK a few times, I really have not noticed a giant difference.

There is also
Brit- "Tube" or "Underground"
Amer-"Subway" or "Metro"

blink
Give me a break, I created this username when I was a kid...
 
prosa
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 7:18 am

Accelerator
Gas Pedal


Accelerator sometimes is used in the United States. And gas pedal is sometimes shortened to gas ("step on the gas")

Arse
Ass


Youll hear arse in the United States, generally when the speaker is trying to be funny or sarcastic.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
prosa
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 7:28 am

Just from looking at the A-C section of that online dictionary, I can see a few examples with which I disagree (British word first, American second):

Bungalow
Single-storey house


Bungalow is used in the United States, to denote a certain style of house (one floor, large porch in front, most often built in the 1920's). And the preferred American term for what the British would call a bungalow is not single-story house (note the lack of an "e" in story), but ranch.

Cul-de-sac
Dead end


The real estate industry in the United State definitely prefers cul-de-sac, as you'll see on newspaper real estate listings, because the term dead end is considered to have negative connotations.

Curriculum vitae
Resume


Curriculum vitae, often expressed as C.V., is the preferred term in the medical field.

"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
deltaflyertoo
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 8:13 am

I've also observed that when the English speak, they speak with full complete sentences. Us Americans tend to take a lazier approach and end sentences with prepositions, shorten our sentences and add a lot of slang.

I just got back from London and sat in different pubs listening to the accents. It was a great experience, I love the way the English speak.
 
bmi330
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RE: What Defunct Carrier Do You Miss Most?

Sun May 05, 2002 8:22 am

I WOULD SAY IT DEPEND WHERE YOU COME FROM IN COUNTRY TO IN MOST INCTINSE IN THOSE EXAMPLES I WOULD USE THE UK ENGLISH BUT IN OTHER'S THE US ENGLISH MABE ITS MORE A REGIONAL THING?
 
Arsenal@LHR
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 8:38 am

Also:

UK = Condoms
US = Rubber

lol, that's funny, in the UK a rubber is a another name for eraser.

Arsenal@LHR
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pacificjourney
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 8:59 am

My favourite is always,

" Excuse me, I'm just going outside to smoke a fag".

Am I,

A Going for a cigarette or,

B About to murder a homosexual.

BTW I think Alsatian and German Shepherd are actually different breeds.
" Help, help ... I'm being oppressed ... "
 
JetService
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 9:09 am

I thought a single-story house was a 'ranch' and a bungalow was a small ranch (like a cottage).
"Shaddap you!"
 
Yazoo
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 9:18 am

smoke a fag  Big thumbs up !!! hahahahahaha
Purple Pride!
 
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yyz717
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 9:20 am

Actually, the word 'bungalow' comes from Hindi..adopted by the British in India.....means 'a flat house'.

I dumped at the gybe mark in strong winds when I looked up at a Porter Q400 on finals. Can't stop spotting.
 
Hurricane
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 9:21 am

No...we say condom here...Most people don't call it a rubber...
 
carmy
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 2:42 pm

Was it Dan Quayle who said it's spelled "potatoe"? Big grin
 
trident3
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 4:56 pm

Anyone read Bill Bryson's The Lost Continent, it is all about how American English developed from the mother tounge.It also covers why we spell the same word differently ie centre/center
"We are the warrior race-Tough men in the toughest sport." Brian Noble, Head Coach, Great Britain Rugby League.
 
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BNE
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 8:14 pm

Those Bill Bryson books about words are very funny, also his travel books are also good as well.
There are some words in both lists that Australians would use, I think we would use the American words more than the English equivalents.

To English or Americans on this forum would you not use the others words at some point.

Looking on the list;
I can't believe that Americans wouldn't use the word fortnight.
Why fly non stop when you can connect
 
prosa
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 11:46 pm

Looking on the list;
I can't believe that Americans wouldn't use the word fortnight.


I know, it's a useful term, if for no other reason than that most people in the United States get paid every two weeks, i.e. fortnightly. "Biweekly" is no substitute as too many people believe that means twice a week.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
prosa
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 11:49 pm

Us Americans tend to take a lazier approach and end sentences with prepositions

I don't know where we got that practice from. I've already heard about it from a language expert I talked to. A preposition is definitely a bad word to end a sentence with.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
trident3
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RE: British/American English

Sun May 05, 2002 11:55 pm

SOME GUIDELINES FOR ASPIRING WRITERS

Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

And don’t start a sentence with a conjunction.

It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

Avoid cliches like the plague.(They’re old hat.)

Also,always avoid annoying alliteration.

Also too,never,ever use repetitive redundancies.

Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are (usually) unnecessary.

Contractions aren’t necessary and shouldn’t be used.

One should never generalise.

Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

The passive voice is to be avoided.

Eliminate commas,that are not necessary.

Never use a big word when a diminutive one will suffice.

Understatement is always the absolute best way to put forth earthshaking ideas.

Use the apostrophe in it’s proper place and omit when its not needed.

Eliminate quotations.As Ralph Waldo Emerson said “I have quotations.Tell me what you know.”

Even if a mixed metaphor sings , it should be derailed.

Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

Proofread carefully to see it you any words out.
"We are the warrior race-Tough men in the toughest sport." Brian Noble, Head Coach, Great Britain Rugby League.
 
seven_fifty7
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RE: British/American English

Mon May 06, 2002 3:15 am

 Big thumbs up

All of that is hilarious Trident3!


Unfortunately, I'm willing to bet half of the readers here failed to recognize the humor.
 
Air Taiwan
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RE: British/American English

Mon May 06, 2002 11:04 pm

I think most people got it! Even I've got it!:D
 
vickybiccy
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RE: British/American English

Mon May 06, 2002 11:35 pm

I've only been to the US once but there was one phrase that really got me!

"Stop it, already" That would never be used in Britain.(not that I know of anyway!)

Also, RogueTrader, not sure about what you said about "Shorts" but in England "Pants" or "Boxer Shorts" are what men wear as underwear (if they're not wearing Long Johns or going commando!)
 
LH423
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RE: British/American English

Tue May 07, 2002 8:17 am

Another one:

OI! (UK/Australia)
Hey! (US/Canada)

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
EWRvirgin
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RE: British/American English

Tue May 07, 2002 3:10 pm

PROSA,

Depending on the context in which bi-weekly is used, it can mean every two weeks or twice a week.

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