tranceport
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The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 8:15 am

Okay, right off the bat let's establish that this is an inane, mindless thread. With that out of the way, here goes a question that as a foreign language enthusiast I have wondered about for many years: What does the English language sound like and how does it flow to people who do not speak it or learned it as a second language?

For example, to the majority of English speakers, there are distinct sounds and rhythms to certain foreign languages: Spanish is a soft, beautiful, melodious langage; Italian is reminiscent of a stacatto, driving force; German has a hard, exotic industrial sound which makes for great vocals in certain styles of techno music; Chinese often sounds high pitched and insistent; Japanese comes across in rapid fire bursts with periodic pauses; and Dutch.....well.....is hideous (this conclusion is drawn from sitting beside two Dutch speakers on a two hour flight from MEM to MCO aboard a NW A320).

I feel a bit amateurish posting this sort of thread, but this is probably the best access I have to a worldwide audience.
 
UAL747
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 9:55 am

When I did a foreign exchange program in France, I lived with a family from Lorient. They said when they hear a bunch of Americans speaking English, it sounds to them like, "Rar rar rar rar rar rar." Don't ask me why, just what they said.

UAL747
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
N766UA
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:18 am

Spanish is a soft, beautiful, melodious langage

Not when it's used on a Soap Opera, that's for damn sure  Big thumbs up.
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UAL747
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:21 am

Yeah, Spanish, (Mexican Spanish) has to be one of the ugliest languages on earth. Second would have to be a Mexican speaking English.

UAL747
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
tranceport
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:51 am

While I would agree that Mexican Spanish may not be the creme de la creme of Spanish accents, I still contend that Spanish is a soft and melodious language. It is a vowel based language, unlike English which is based on consonants. The words all flow into each other and there is a smooth cadence to the language. There are no hard sounds and no gutteral sounds except for the j, which is not really gutteral but sounds slightly so.

It may vary widely across Mexico, but earlier this year I spent some time working in the Yucatan Peninsula. There was a marked difference between the Spanish used by those of European descent and that used by the Maya Indians and those out in the bush where I worked. I'll agree the latter wasn't really a treat to hear.

In their favour, Mexicans probably speak the closest to textbook Spanish that I have encountered. If you learn it out of a book and in a classroom setting, it is not difficult to pick it up quickly there because they speak relatively slowly and 'correctly' unlike, for example, the Dominican Republic where you can study Spanish until your hair turns white and then go there and not understand one damn thing.

Of course, as an eleven year student of Spanish, I'm probably highly biased.
 
lubcha132
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:52 am

the truth is, even within the language i've wondered how british people look at american english.
 
N766UA
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:55 am

According to the two Australian exchange students I had last month, the American accent is "Annoying to the guys, but the chicks love it."
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tranceport
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 11:10 am

I never knew we as Americans had an accent. Egocentric thinking no doubt. However, after my first trip out of North America to France, I learned we did. After nearly a week without hearing any Americans speak, I was riding the subway to Franklin D. Roosevelt stop in Paris. All of a sudden, so distinctly I heard a somewhat nasal, twangy speech pattern that was so familiar my head jerked around to look and I chuckled to myself as I suddenly 'got it' that Americans indeed do have a distinct accent.
 
kolobokman
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 11:16 am

English sounds like: woowooowooo


Of course the softest and most enjoyable for the ear is my native tongue
I can neither confirm, nor deny above post
 
NKP S2
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 12:40 pm

--"Yeah, Spanish, (Mexican Spanish) has to be one of the ugliest languages on earth. Second would have to be a Mexican speaking English."

I agree. Always sounded very "dirty" to my ears.

Russian intrigues me the most: On one hand the spoken part seems much closer to the written language, with not too many exceptions...yet the rythm of it throws me: The 'lilt" of a sentence often keeps me wondering if there's more, as the ending of a sentence in Russian often sounds like the middle of a sentence in English. Sounding out of consecutive hard vowels was also hard for me to learn...and I still can't roll my "Rs" worth a damn. Love to hear it spoken though.


 
BartiniMan
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 1:18 pm

NKP_S2 if you like the sound of Russian I suggeset you download the song "Red Army Choir - The Hunt For Red October" . It's the song at the starting credits of the film of the same name. I d/l it a few days ago and am constantly listening to it. A beautiful hymn.

The song is also sometimes titled "Russian Navy Hymn"

Cheers
BartiniMan
 
MD-90
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 1:43 pm

Of course it's been said, Southerners trying to speak spanish sounds a lot like cussing (from our 2002 mission trip to Mexico).

Italian has to be one of the most beautiful languages out there. I wouldn't call it soft, but definately melodious. English is pronounced mostly from the throat, Italian is deeper, more from the heart and belly.

German does sound very different, sort of technical you could say. Lots of stops.

I'm taking Latin in college. We haven't really gotten far enough yet that I really can describe what it sounds like. Sort of limited, to me, compared to English though (for example, all C's are hard like a K, no soft c as in celebrity).
 
jcs17
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 1:55 pm

German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian all sound very choppy, hard, and as someone else put it, technical, compared to English.

Finnish sounds interesting because their are so many repeating sounds.

I think French sounds really good, if spoken by a native French person.

However, the hottest accent for a female is a British, Welsh, or Irish accent. Too bad the females in all those places despise American guys!  Sad

America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
 
UAL747
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 2:56 pm

MD-90,
While certain letters make certain sounds, Latin doesn't have an accent.
"Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy. Bangkok Tower, United 890 Heavy.....Okay, fine, we'll just turn 190 and Visual Our Way
 
rindt
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 3:36 pm

JCS,

"However, the hottest accent for a female is a British, Welsh, or Irish accent. Too bad the females in all those places despise American guys! "

It only applies to you if you buy into it, if you don't, then it doesn't.

I happen to know the Australian women (who have a similar accent to the British) love the CDN/US accent  Big grin So don't beat yourself up over it...

-Rob
What other people think of you is none of your business!
 
QANTASforever
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 3:48 pm

I happen to know the Australian women (who have a similar accent to the British..

With respect there is a major marked difference between the British and Australian English accents.

The Modern Australian accent is a perfect fusion between North American and English English. Trust me on that. When I hear an American who has spent some time in the UK or vise versa - I confuse them for Australians.

never knew we as Americans had an accent. Egocentric thinking no doubt.

Egocentric indeed. Are you joking though? Surely when you saw people from UK or Australia you noticed a difference in the accent. Did you just think: "Why aren't they speaking proper English like I am?" If so - It makes me a little worried.

But yes, I love the American accent - when spoken well. Katherine Hepburn and her: "Tha Cannalillies aaaare in bloom Agen" accent does it for me every time. New England accents rock! But when ANY accent is taken to a colloquial extreme, it is really off-putting. Just look at Steve Irwin for Australia, Eastenders in the UK and the Beverly Hillbillies in the USA.

But gimme a French accent anyday. My wife has one - and it was love at first syllable.

qff
Fighting for the glory of the Australian Republic.
 
Guest

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 4:07 pm

Interesting topic.

I like the Southern American accent when well spoken.

I personally feel that any national language spoken well sounds quite pleasant.. It's when you have trash who are not well versed that ruin a language's resonance with native slang and hideous drawls.

Australians accent is regional just like the UK / USA. I have found that Americans and French Canadians in particular confuse my accent with that of English.

I really like Thai and Malay as it's very melodic too.

Cheers,

mb

*toybox II* *daytime is playtime*
 
707CMF
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 4:08 pm

I think French sounds really good, if spoken by a native French person.

That can't be ! Jcs actually said something positive about the French !!!

707
 
UTA_flyinghigh
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 4:22 pm

That shows that you have never heard a Marseillais or a Quebecer speak  Laugh out loud
Will
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sebolino
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 4:45 pm

The most difficult for a French in English is the R. This famous R is even more difficult than the TH.

In English you don't pronounce the R in an aggressive way like we do in French, but you do it very "roundly" without angles, it sounds nearly like a French L or more like a mix between W and L.

This is how it sounds to me: WA WA WA LA WA WA WA  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Except in some English movies where people roll the R !!

Difficult to say:

- Rawhide (WOW WIDE)
- Matter
 
ussherd
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 6:17 pm

I'm a native English/Spanish speaker.

In English, I particularly like the slightly posh (as opposed to upper class) south-east England accent. I don't really like my own English accent (Northern Irish) which is a cross between the southern Irish & Scottish accents and can be the most cringe-inducing accent on earth, especially in the hands of some of our ghetto dwelling compatriots. It amazes me how many local accents exist here in the British Isles. Northern Ireland has a population of about 1.5 million and there are at last half a dozen distinct accents. Probably they would all sound the same to an outsider, but the local can quite readily tell where certain people come from and in some cases, make an educated guess at to their religion. I've found that a great many English speakers are completely amazed at the idea that other languages also have regional accents and variations. I suppose that's probably because native English speakers tend to be monoligual?

In Spanish, I much prefer the Latin American version of the language, particularly the accents from the countries in and around the Caribbean. I don't like the European accent. No offense, but I always think that a Spaniard sounds like a badly tuned radio, with a lot of static and interference!

To me, Brazilian Portuguese is the best sounding language of them all. It's liquid and sexy and fits exactly with the romanticised idea of Brazil I have in my head. Italian also sounds good.

German, Dutch & the Scandinavian languages sound harsh. I'm ambivalent about French. It's flows well, but it seems to me that it has no body (if that makes sense!)
Cada loco con su tema...
 
Banco
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 6:18 pm

I suppose it's true that most people tend to think, at least early in life, that they do not have an accent whilst everybody else does. For us Brits, most would say that it is French that sounds the nicest, a mellifluous language that is beautiful on the ear. Of course, this perspective is usually wrecked as oon as you start to understand them - a language sounds far more beautiful if you do not comprehend it. I have heard that the English speaking French (well, not badly) sounds pleasant on the French ear - but she may have just been trying to chat me up.  Big grin

I have to agree with Qantasforever on the differences between Australian and English accents though. It is a curiosity that so many Americans mistake the British (particularly the English) for Australians. It's a bit puzzling, particularly as there as so many more of us than them. Some of the posher Australian accents are akin to the posher English accents, but that's also true of some of the accents you hear in a place like Vermont as well. I suppose that not noticing the differences between Canadians and Americans over here is equally common.

In terms of the the development of these accents, the North Americans are probably a little more consistent historically than the rest of the English speaking world. The hard "r" was prevalent throughout much of England four hundred years ago, and the long "a" was an affectation from the 18th and 19th centuries. Whilst it is not true to say that Americans speak English in the way that the English did in Shakespeare's time, it probably is true that the North American accents are rather closer than the Englsih or Australian ones.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
gkirk
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 6:49 pm

Its known worldwide that the Scottish accent is the best  Big thumbs up
When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
 
racko
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:32 pm

American English sounds way cooler, but British English is far easier to understand. When watching an American TV station, I have to pay attention to understand everything while when watching the BBC it just flows into your ear. Also AE is more masculine and sounds not-so-hot when spoken by a woman, BE sounds nice when spoken by a female but a bit gay-ish when spoken by a guy. The most extreme example for this is French, so hot when spoken by a female, but it sounds strange when spoken by a guy. German is more masculine like AE. I prefer German girls with a slight accent (e.g. Bavarian, Austrian or French) to a girl from Hannover  Big grin
 
jcs17
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Tue Sep 23, 2003 11:46 pm

That can't be ! Jcs actually said something positive about the French !!!

Ahhh, dont take that comment too seriously  Big grin I was just referencing the fact that only a native speaker makes French sound good. Otherwise, its like fingernails across a chalkboard.

To me, Brazilian Portuguese is the best sounding language of them all. It's liquid and sexy and fits exactly with the romanticised idea of Brazil I have in my head. Italian also sounds good.

Brazilian Portuguese is one of the worst sounding dialects ever. To me, at least, it sounds like a mix between Spanish and Chinese.

It only applies to you if you buy into it, if you don't, then it doesn't.


Go to London, and youll buy into it. The only people that you'll ever see male American ex-pats dating is American female ex-pats. I actually dated an Irish girl in high school, she had moved to America when she was three...so there was no accent  Sad ....but she was a redhead  Big thumbs up

I really like my grandparents remaining South African accents. You can barely hear them now, since they left 50+ years ago, but its very distinctive.
America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
 
BarfBag
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 12:10 am

Tsk tsk.... 24 posts on the sound of English and not one mention of the sound of the English spoken by the second largest population of English speakers on the planet - Indians! By the end of this decade there'll probably be more speakers of English as more or less a first language, in India than in USA.

I understand that India might not immediately be seen as an English-speaking country but English is one of the official languages and the primary link language in a country with 820 recognized languages and 18 official languages.

Accentwise, I've always found English spoken by Germans the easiest to understand, for some reason. Next comes that spoken by the British. American accents, particularly southern and south-western, are harder. But I suppose the opinion dates back to a rather hilarious episode at a bar in Austin, TX during my first visit to the US, when the conversation between me and the waitress was an exercise in mutual incomprehension, so much so that it was hard to stomach that both of us were supposedly speaking the same language. Now lets hear some impressions about English as spoken by Indians  Smile
 
tranceport
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 12:26 am

Egocentric indeed. Are you joking though? Surely when you saw people from UK or Australia you noticed a difference in the accent. Did you just think: "Why aren't they speaking proper English like I am?" If so - It makes me a little worried.

Coming from a rural farm in the southern state of Mississippi, I think it fair to say that I had never seen a person from the UK or Australia. We didn't even have a television, so there wasn't much exposure to things like that, for sure. In spite of all that, I think the biggest reason was probably my age and maturity level at that time. When you grow up in an area and haven't seen much of the world and everyone around you speaks the same way you do, at a young age it sort of just seems natural to you that you speak 'normal' English and other people have the accents.

I like the Southern American accent when well spoken.

As a native born Southerner, I can say a few things with some confidence about this. The Southern accent varies dramatically across the South. There are even slight regional variations between towns in rather close proximity.

However, one thing is certain: the Southern American accent can be either incredible or atrocious. The type of English that is spoken by more of a middle class and upper class educated person is perhaps one of the softest, sexiest things you will ever hear. It is best described as rather musical and rounded out with a drawl. At the other end of the spectrum is the rather hideous twangy drawl that makes you feel nauseous. Say "trailer park accent" to anyone in the local area, and they'll know *exactly* what I'm talking about. I'm convinced there's a reason everytime you are flipping channels and come across Jerry Springer that the obscenish 'guests' are shouting out that verbal diahrrea. It has to be the American English at it's worst.

Sadly enough, although I grew up here my parents are both from the Midwest. Midwestern English is considered to be 'unaccented' English as far as American English goes. I'm afraid my speech is fairly boring.
 
ussherd
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 12:54 am

Now lets hear some impressions about English as spoken by Indians

It very much depends on the speaker. The musical inflection of fluently spoken Indian English is very pleasant, but the effect can be marred if the underlying accent of the speaker's mother tongue is very strong. The same goes for Spanish accented English. I like to hear a hint of Spanish in an English speaker, but the effect is totally marred if the Spanish accent is more than just a hint... I think this thread just goes to show that beauty is in the ear of the hearer!


Cada loco con su tema...
 
Sabena332
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 12:57 am

American English sounds way cooler, but British English is far easier to understand.

I agree but I must say that the California accent is also very easy to understand.

Patrick
NZ1's mother is a disgusting crack-whore and his father is a worthless alcoholic!
 
tranceport
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 1:14 am

In Vancouver we have a sizeable Indian population. As I understand, many of them are Sikh from the Punjab region. Although Punjabi sounds bad enough in it's own right, the English these people speak, if intelligible at all is just wrong. It's like Apu on the Simpsons times five. I have been known to sit in the back of a cab and periodically say "yes" or "I see" to pretend like I know what I'm being told by a Sikh cab driver when he makes conversation.

On the other hand, I have a friend who is a native English speaker from the city of Hyderabad in southern India. Like with so many Indians, I could sit and listen to that lilt all day. The inflection they use is completely different from any other English accent I have heard.

I agree a lot with the posts about just a hint of an accent being really neat.
 
kilavoud
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 3:56 am

It sounds nice, and when it is spoken by Americans (USA), I can appreciate
the certain something which make all the difference.
Regards. Kilavoud.

 
prosa
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 4:37 am

Now lets hear some impressions about English as spoken by Indians

As an English-speaker from the United States, I find the variety of English spoken by Indians to be somewhat difficult to understand. There is something about the Indian accent that renders English a bit impenetrable to listeners. I've noticed this effect with Indians who speak English very well, so long as they have a moderate or strong accent. Granted, not everyone may have the same impressions as I do, and the native language of the Indian speaker may play a part.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
Scorpio
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 4:45 am

American English sounds way cooler, but British English is far easier to understand.

I disagree. Oxford English, or 'The Queen's English' is easy to understand, but hardly anyone in the UK speaks that. I sometimes have great difficulty understanding certain British dialects. Take Manchester for example: have you ever heard an interview with Noel or Liam Gallagher? It's hideous, and I usually only understand half of it. Many British speakers 'swallow' many of the sounds, or just don't pronounce certain letters (e.g. the 'glottal stop'). This makes some things difficult to understand. I never have that problem with American English. A plus for AE is also the fact that variations within the US are smaller than they are in the UK, and most of the accents are closer to Standard American than those in the UK are to Oxford English.
 
aloges
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 5:20 am

"To me, Brazilian Portuguese is the best sounding language of them all. It's liquid and sexy and fits exactly with the romanticised idea of Brazil I have in my head."

I also like it; however, we... oops, they have different accents. When I speak my "native" Brazilian accent, people will probably be able to tell where I learnt it. People from my state will maybe also be able to tell whether I'm from the capital or not.

Now, if you talk to someone from São Paulo state, you'll get to hear a very different accent; same for many other areas and states such as Rio de Janeiro.

But overall, Brazilian Portuguese is very melodic, "smooth" and easy on the ear once you're used to it. Contrary to Portuguese Portuguese, we actually pronounce almost all vowels and accentuate what's important.



The perception of German also has to depend a lot on who speaks it. First of all, we've got many dialects that could basically be called languages, like Bavarian. Then, we've got ancient languages such as North German "Platt" and "Alemannisch" from the Southwest.

Second, there are regional accents. For example, people from the Rhine/Ruhr area often have a slightly smoother accent than someone from, say, Hamburg. People from my area, especially "working class" members, have their own little accent, which would probably not make any German remember posh cafés or anything else related to prosperity.

Another difference is the one between West German and East German terminology. Over the years, expressions established by the East German government have become parts of the language; such as "object" instead of "house".
Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.
 
N766UA
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 5:27 am

Tranceport: You hit the nail right on the head about southern accents. Some I find sound very educated, while others (probably most, really) make me want to gag. It depends where you're from and your heritage, I guess.
This Website Censors Me
 
777kicksass
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Wed Sep 24, 2003 7:08 am

I also find it fascinating how many variants of English there are!!

My favourite has to be South African! Its just really cool can't think of any posh words to describe it!
 
milemaster
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 4:26 am

I've heard the same thing about men with american english accents being a verbal panty remover to Australian women.

I don't understand it really.. I've always viewed our version of english to be far less exotic than other flavors.
 
docpepz
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 6:36 am

Well coming from Singapore, a former British colony, the government forced everyone to learn English as a first language, and use it as a medium of instruction for all subjects, 35 years ago.

Today a generation of Singaporeans have grown up prefering to speak English over their own mother tongue (including myself)

One could argue we speak a form of English called Singlish, which just mixes English, chinese and malay.....

To me though, English is the language I'm most comfortable speaking and to some extent I get annoyed when I travel to other parts of the world and people don't speak it!

 
cancidas
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 7:16 am

do you mean american english or proper english? i think that american english is diffucult to understand to a lot. it's hard for me to understand sometimes and i live in NYC. i have never had problems understanding proper english.
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
flyboy36y
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 8:03 pm

Spanish can be one of the sexiest languages on earth... if spoken by a sexy person. When my friend speaks it the words flow from her lips and dance around my ears tapping at me, inviting me to join in the dance. But alas, I cannot speak the language with enough grace as not to step on her linguisic toes.
 
Krushny
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 8:36 pm

Spanish is a soft, beautiful, melodious langage;

Well, not the Spanish I speak... The "correct" Spanish has its jotas, erres & zetas and no musicality at all. Of European langauges, I would group Spanish along with Dutch and Greek in the group of least melodious languages, with Italian, French and Swedish in the contrarian side of the spectrum.
But at the same time Spanish is spoken in many places and has a lot of different accents & dialects. In the old country along with regular Spanish we have Galician, Catalonian, Aragonese accents as well as southern ones which are more similar to what is spoken in America. In America there is also a great variety of accents, like Argentinian (which is Spanish spoken with an Italian entonation), Caribbean & Central American (I like specially how the Venezuelan and Colombians speak), Cuban or Mexican. And there is also the one used in Hollywood for movies or TV Spanish versions which is probably the ugliest sounding of all...

Going to the quote at the begining of my post, there is surely a nice looking Latin American señorita that means something to the starter of the thread...
 
David_itl
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Thu Sep 25, 2003 11:02 pm


Oy Scorpio less slagging off of the Mancunian accent; the Gallaghers are not representative of it! Think of John Thaw (Inspector Morse) instead for what it sounds like.

David
 
bobrayner
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 4:41 am

John Thaw's accent is hardly Manc!

Think of Terry Christian  Wink/being sarcastic
Cunning linguist
 
RNOcommctr
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RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 9:49 am

UAL747-- if you think a Mexican speaking English sounds ugly, I can only imagine how ugly YOU would sound trying to speak Spanish! I never used to care much for the sound of Spanish, but now that I have learned it to some degree, I think it's a very pretty language. And much more expressive than English-- many more words with nuances, especially those dealing with emotions.
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UPSfueler
Posts: 425
Joined: Sun May 25, 2003 9:40 am

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 10:22 am

I wana learn how to speak italian. Is there anyone here who knows how and is it hard to learn?
 
Lan_Fanatic
Posts: 1056
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2001 11:41 am

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 12:08 pm

Krushny:

You forgot the chilean accent and also the peruvian-bolivian accent.
If I had to choose between any spanish accent, I would choose the argentinean one. Its a mix between spanish language and itaqlian accent, sounds extremely beautiful.

Also I like (don't ask me why) the way we chileans and argentinaeans have "deformed" the spanish language.

Here go some examples:

verb:

Poder (to can) in the conjugation "tú puedes"(you can) chileans speak it "tú podís" without pronounsing the final S, and argentineans say it "vos podés".

Querer (to want), when we want to say "you want-tú quieres" we say "tu querís" and argentineans say "vos querés".

my 2 cents
 
767-332ER
Posts: 1974
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2001 1:20 pm

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 7:51 pm


My g/f is from Spain and the one thing that turns her on is when I speak english (U.S.A.) to her. She only likes the American english. She would rather me speak to her in english than spanish (which I have a slight accent and though most people rather hear accents) well, she wants for me to speak english. I have heard that a lot of women that are not from the U.S. prefer American accents, as annoying as they may be to guys.
Twinjets...if one fails, work the other one twice as hard!!!
 
Krushny
Posts: 756
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2000 4:22 am

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Fri Sep 26, 2003 9:50 pm

Lan_Fanatic,
I did not try to be exhaustive in my enumeration of Spanish accents. In Spain there are much more than I said, for example in the southerners people from Sevilla do not speak the same as in Granada or Cádiz or Murcia or Canarias. And I am sure there are a zillion different accents from Tierra de Fuego to Rio Grande...
From Argentina, I find very funny that some "normal" words in Spain, like concha or coger, are dirty words there...
 
Lan_Fanatic
Posts: 1056
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2001 11:41 am

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Sat Sep 27, 2003 12:50 am

About "coger"...

my sister had a teddy bear that spoke when you hugged it...and the only phrase it said was:"vamos,cógeme...cógeme bien fuerte" with a slightly erotic madrilian accent. Quite weird.
 
kilavoud
Posts: 863
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2003 7:47 pm

RE: The Sound Of English To Foreign Ears

Sat Sep 27, 2003 4:23 am

When British are speaking I hear turkeys
When US are speaking , what should I say, yes some animal with a chewing gum in their throat, but I like it. Really.  Laugh out loud  Laugh out loud  Laugh out loud
Regards. Kilavoud.

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