DFWLandingPath
Topic Author
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Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2001 12:17 pm

American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:15 am

When talking to a foreign exchange student from Germany the other day, she said that one of the wierdest things for her in her first days in the US was going from the British English that she learned in school and the American English that she was now emmersed in. For those non-native English speakers out there, what version of English did you learn and where did you learn it? Which do you find easier to use around the world?

Cheers,
DFWLandingPath
 
Qb001
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:39 am

I learned English Canadian, which is closer to British English than to American English.

I like it better because it's closer to French, thus easier to remember.
French: couleur
British (Canadian): colour
American: color

French: organiser
British (Canadian): to organise
American: to organize

See...

When I have to work in English, I set the MS Word language setting to Canadian English.
Never let the facts get in the way of a good theory.
 
APT
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:48 am

Hello,
Like almost every other German pupil I learned British English from the old-fashioned teachers (50+). They absolutely disliked using American English but now that I had few younger teachers over the last 2 years I found out that they don't care whether you like British English Or American English better. Some of them even speak American English themselves.
So you see things aren't that strict anymore.

Greets
Alex
 
photopilot
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:58 am

They are both English, but I dare say.... one country butchers it less than the other.

American English is less formal, more slang orientated, and brought us new words such as "ain't", "cain't", "you'all" and other regionalisms.

But then again, any country that spells lieutenant, yet pronounces it leftenant hasn't got it all together either.

But hey, what do I know... I'm a Canuck...eh!
Steve
 
zak
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 11:03 am

american english always reminds me of people unable to tell the difference between "their/there" etc. i guess multiple choice education takes its toll there.
i use british words mostly and pronounce it in a mixture dominated by american english  Smile

[Edited 2004-02-17 03:03:56]
10=2
 
DFWLandingPath
Topic Author
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 11:11 am

Photopilot:

It's 'y'all'  Big grin

Cheers,
DFWLandingPath
 
Lan_Fanatic
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 12:22 pm

The english I learnt is an hybrid.

For example, I learnt about neighbour and colour, but at the same time about trucks and roosters instead of lorries and cocks.
 
photopilot
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 12:24 pm

Awe shucks DFWLandingPath..... we all tried our best cept we be lackin in formal yankee words.
 
LH423
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 1:48 pm

American English is less formal, more slang orientated

I partially agree with this sentence. While formal American English may a bit more relaxed than British English, I find the Brits have way more slang/colloquialisms that Americans.

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
emiratesa345
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 2:28 pm

" learned English Canadian, which is closer to British English than to American English"

I disagree. Our Canadian English is definitely more similar to the American English. Although some Americans have an accent (to me) such as the New Yorker accent, or the South Carolina accent, the words are almost the same except for some slurrs. I find that the majority of Americans that I have spoken to speak the same way I do.

EmiratesA345 Smile/happy/getting dizzy
You and I were meant to fly, Air Canada!
 
MD-90
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 5:52 pm

I understand that yankee is a colloquialism for an American, but I can assure you that no yankees say y'all. At least none that I've ever heard.

My favorite is yea. "It's yea long or yea wide." (pronounced, yay). Yea can be anything from 1/10" to a couple of tens of miles.

I love english but I sure wouldn't want to have to learn it. I've done German and I'm doing Latin now and they are both much more structured and easier to learn (especially Latin).

And if we count rappers' language then American English definately has more slang...
 
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sebolino
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 6:03 pm

The most important is not the spelling you learnt, but the accent.

I for sure didn't learn American accent at school, but it wasn't British neither. In fact I was very surprised when I came to London at 13, people were talking with a very strange accent compared to what I was used to.

And I think the "family" were I was, was even stranger: in fact she was a journalist, and when she said "What did you do today ?" I clearly heard "What did you do to die ?".  Smile I wonder what was this accent. Anybody can tell me ?
 
s.p.a.s.
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 8:25 pm

Hey Sebolino...

This reminds me an old joke..

English man, first time across the pond, arrives at NY goes to the hotel and decides take a sleep and see the city later.
Next day, about to cross a street, he obviously looks to the wrong direction, and unaware of a yellow cab racing down the street, stars walking. Indeed the driver manages to stop the car, inches from the Brit, and the driver jumps out of the car and yells...
-Hey dude, did you come here do die?
And our hero says: (note, please imagine strong accent)
-No sir, actually I arrived here yesterday

Maybe not very funny, but true indeed..

Cheers

RS
"ad astra per aspera"
 
donder10
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Tue Feb 17, 2004 8:34 pm

American English is certainly more colloquial when it comes to adverb.
England-He is playing really well.
US-He is playing real well.
 
csavel
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 12:27 am

Canadian English is closer to American English, although the orthography is closer to British.

Case in point.

Canadians drive trucks, not lorries. Cars have hoods and trunks, not boots and bonnets. They use windsheild wipers, not windscreen wipers, and spark plugs as opposed to sparking plugs.
They eat eggplant, and not aubergines. (I think at least)
they say gotten, and don't use the British 'singluar plural" (The army are on maneuvers)

however, they use "to table a motion" in the British sense, stay in hospital, not in the hospital, and eat candy floss, not cotton candy. They fly return, rather than round trip (At least Air Canada does). Any Canadians can join in right now with more examples.
The accent, while unique, is closer to American, in that they pronounce their R's and say words like caught almost like cot (Some American say caught and cot exactly alike) British people say caught almost like New Yorkers, although more clipped.

Orthography-wise (How's that for an Americanism)
Canadians follow the British use in words like honor > "honour"
traveler and jeweler > "traveller" and "jeweller"
offense and defense > "offence, and defence"

But i think they use the z rather than the s in words like criticize, at least that is what I always see in Canadian papers.
They also use American spellig of words like jail, curb, and tire

All in all in interesting and beautiful hybrid.

I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
 
MYT332
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 1:48 am

English English is the proper English. All the others are just bastardised versions of our language.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
One Life, Live it.
 
Greg
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 1:49 am

Born and raised in SoCal....but to German and English parents. As well, studied in London for two years as an undergraduate.

No discernable accent...but my spelling on some things is a bit off:
centre, labour, honour, colour all come to mind. This is VERY confusing to Texans.....("Ya'll can put the luggage in the boot!")
 
tokolosh
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 1:53 am

What about South African English? A traffic light is called a "robot". I actually failed my driver's license because I called it a traffic light. But perhaps my accent wasn't thick enough  Smile
Did the chicken or the egg get laid first?
 
Banco
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 2:01 am

The leftenant/lootenant pronunciation of lieutenant is a fascinating one. I've seen various explanations of why we British say the former, which is clearly counter-intuitive. One is that the "u" was initially misread as a "v", another says that it was taken from leave-tenant,with leave being an anglicisation of the first half of the compound, "lieu". To be honest, neither of these ring especially true to me, especially when you consider that the Royal Navy historically had a pronunciation closer to the American one, L'f'tnt or L'tenant. So why did the army continue to so expressively say Leftenant? Very odd. Even more so when you hear Canadian officers say it the "British" way.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
airsicknessbag
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 2:46 am


When I went to school we were always demonstrated both British and American orthography and terms.

Ever heard this one before?

Imagine an Italian tourist, speaking in tick accented English:

"One day I gonna to Malta to a big hotel, in the morning I go down to eat a breakfast. I tell the waitress that I want two pieces of toast. She brings me only one piece. I tell her "I wanna two pieces". She say "Go to the toilet". I say "you don't understand, I wanna two pieces on my plate". She say to me: "you better not piss on the plate, you sonnawabitch". I do not even know this lady and she call me a sonnawabitch !!

Later I go to eat at a bigger restaurant. The waiter brings me a spoon and a knife but no fork. I tell her "I wanna a fork" and she tell me: "everyone wanna fuck ". I tell her "you don't understand me... I wanna fork on the table". She say: "you better not fuck on the table you sonnawabitch" .

So I go back to my room in my hotel and there is no sheets on the bed. I call the manager and tell him "I wanna a sheet". he tell me to go the toilet. I say "you don't understand I wanna a sheet on my bed". He say: "you better not shit on the bed, you sonnawabitch".

I go to the Check out and the man at the desk said "peace on you", and I say: "Piss on you too, you sonnawabicth". I gonna back to Italy


Daniel Smile
 
andz
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:46 am

Reminds me of a sitcom (American) years ago when the trend seemed to be to have a British cast member in every show (a la Mr Belvedere)

One of the American cast members said to Lynn Redgrave "oh yeah, you're the one with the funny accent" (or words to that effect)

She replied, in an icy tone..."I speak English....YOU have the accent!'
After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
 
MD-90
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:53 am

Real well is real wrong!

Unless you're a rapper on MTV, apparently.
 
Banco
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:02 am

Not forgetting the legendary occasion when an American director told Richard Burton to grab Elizabeth Taylor's fanny. Well, he did exactly what he thought he been asked to, but sadly the footage, though doubtless highly entertaining, has never seen the light of day.  Big grin
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
GDB
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:33 am

In the UK, 'smoking a fag' is inhaling tobacco.
In the US it could mean a hate crime.

Is it me, or is the US adopting some of our swear words?
Because you never used to hear Americans use 'wanker' as a term of abuse, in fact I've seen it as surnames in the credits of US films.
But in recent years I've heard it used in the British context by Americans.
 
Arsenal@LHR
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:07 am

"Canadian English"? That's new to me, i thought North American linguistics were essentially the same? i.e Cookies, Soda, Vacation and Mall etc?
In Arsene we trust!!
 
LH423
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:15 am

SODA?! Half the US and most of Canada say the must more annoying "pop".  Smile

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
Cory6188
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:30 am

Not everyone that speaks American English says slang terms such as "ain't" and "y'all". It really depends on what part of the country you are from - New York (the city): "Fuhgeddaboutit!" (Forget about it); Philly: "wit" (with); Boston: "Baaaston" (Boston).
 
Banco
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:01 am

"ain't" is not American English, Cory6188. It has a long and glorious history in English going back many centuries. It just lasted on both sides of the pond.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
Pendrilsaint
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:15 am

Also, "Cain't" is not a seperate word like the ones mentioned above (y'all and ain't) it is just a regional pronunciation of it. (Southern) I have to admit that I do say cain't instead of can't...crazy New Yorkers always make fun of me. =P
 
BN747
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:59 am

What gets me is listening to the tower talk.

I'm not sure if this is just Hong Kong (could be LHR and Sydney too)

Example:Instructing an aircraft to take the runway and hold.

British controller: Cathay 880, runway 13R line up and wait.

US Controller: Cathay 880, taxi into position and hold.

'and wait'...it just sounds wierd!

And the signs all over British airports 'Way Out' versus 'Exit' (in the US)
At 1st I was like Way out? WTF does that mean???

BN747
"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
 
LH423
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 9:07 am

Well, as the old phrase goes "Americans and English are divided by a common language"  Smile

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
photopilot
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:12 am

Here's some more for your amusement.

American - Thruway
British - Motorway
Canadian - Highway
But Canadians also use Parkways.

British - Pavement
Canadian/American - Sidewalk

We park on the Driveway, but drive on the Parkway

British - Roundabout
Canadian - Roundabout or Traffic Circle
American - Traffic Circle

British - Tube or Underground
Canadian - Subway or Metro
American - Subway or Metro or El (evated)

Canadian/American - Fender
British - Wing

Canadian/American - Phone Booth
British - Call Box

 
Cory6188
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:23 am

We call them highways, freeways, thuways, parkways, expressways, and turnpikes. It depends on the name of the road (i.e. Garden State Parkway, New York Thruway, Atlantic City Expressway, NJ Turnpike), and if it doesn't have one (i.e. just a number), then it's the highway.
 
BN747
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:24 am

Whoa there fella.... it's Freeway!..like that thing you're speeding on! : DD

BN747
"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
 
ScarletHarlot
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:47 am

As a Canadian in the US, let me give you more examples of differences between American and Canadian English.

Beneficiary: pronounced "beneFISHary" in Canada, "beneFISHYary" in the US. Drives me nuts. I hear it every day since I am in the retirement business.
Subsidiary: same, "subSIDjury" vs. "subSIDIary"
Corollary: "core-ALL-ar-ee" in Canada, "CORE-oh-larry" in US
Allegory: "al-EGG-or-ee" in Canada, "AL-leg-ory" in the US
Asphalt: "ash-fault" in Canada, "ass-fault" in the US

What's a chesterfield? It's a couch in Canada! And eavestroughing is unknown in the US but in Canada it would go on your roof.

What's that little thing wrapped around your rolled up newspaper? It's an elastic in Canada, a rubber band in the US.

What else do I get made fun of for...

An American says something and I don't understand it. I'll say, "I'm sorry?" Americans don't do that.

I'm at the airport and I have to pee. "Where is the washroom?" I'm not resting, so I don't need the restroom.

Canadian curlers really do use the term "beauty". "That's a beauty shot!"

The pronunciation of garage is an interesting one. Some Canadians, maybe an older generation, say "gradge". My mom says that.

How about the a sound in words like Mazda? In Canada the a is a short a, while in the US it's a long a.

That's all I can think of for now.
But that was when I ruled the world
 
JAL777
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:50 am

How come we park on the driveway and drive on the parkway?  Confused
 
LH423
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 12:44 pm

Since the US and Canada are so large I'll post what's common in New England using the examples of others.

For what Photopilot's examples we use the following in massachusetts:

It's a highway or expressway, NEVER a throughway.
It's a rotary or roundabout almost never a traffic circle.

All other examples are right on.

As for ScarlotHarlot's examples:

I don't know who says "ben-e-fish-ee-ary" but around here it's "ben-e-fish-ary" but I have heard the former said on TV, so that may be how it's pronounced else where.

We do say "I'm sorry?" or "Pardon me?" in these parts if we don't understand something. It may have to do with British politeness still left over. SOOO much nicer than just say "WHAT?!"

We don't use the washroom, however we do use the bathroom. Yes, you may not be resting there, but you're not washing either or taking a bath. I don't think anyone will ever get it right other than just saying "Toilet" which sounds a bit crude or vulgar or the staid and inaccurate "water closet".

And thanks to our French friend to the north, the pronounciation of "garage" will always be "ga-rahzhe".

Then there are some things that make us peculiar to the rest of the English-speaking, North American continent. I always ask to people from outside New England "Your mother's sister is you...?" and invariably people will reply aunt but pronounce it like "ant". Sorry, but an "ant" is a black insect you step on, not a family member. You aunt pronounced "awnt" is that lovely woman who gives you sweet gifts at Christmas time. To this day I've met on girl, a Californian, who said it the way New Englanders do and I think that's only because her father is from Boston.

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
BN747
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 2:06 pm

Don't you mean Baas-ten? Big grin

BN747
"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
 
ScarletHarlot
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:18 pm

LH423:

I've had clients and coworkers in New Jersey, Georgia, Illinois, and Texas all say beneficiary that funny way. They say it like that here in the Pacific Northwest too.

I did also forget to mention pronunciation of sorry. It's "sore-ry", not "sah-ree".

I would also use the word bathroom, probably a bit less than I would washroom. Like you said, not toilet though. I found it odd that washrooms are labelled "Toilets" in Hawaii.

I do say "ant" for aunt, not "awnt".

Highways are freeways here. I have to bite my tongue though. Now I use the term freeway when I go home. Bad Scarlet.  Smile
But that was when I ruled the world
 
DETA737
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:53 pm

I grew up in Connecticut and have been in Canada since 2001 and have noticed some differences in spoken language between New England and Western Canada.

I'm in University (colleges and universities are quite distinct here).

People say ant instead of aunt (Growing up I always thought only hicks referred to their mother or father's sisters as insects)

A package store is a liquor store.

A "tag sale" is a garage sale or yard sale even if one does not have a yard or a garage.

Pop instead of soda.

Runners instead of sneakers (though some people say sneakers).

People go "on holiday" more often than "on vacation".

People say been and against as "bean" and "agAYnst" especially if they're from Ontario.

A grinder is a sub.

Pasta, Mazda, Vietnam, Mario, drama are pronounced differently.

Borrow, Tommorow and Sorry all sound different too. My pronunciation tends to have more of an "ah" sound.

Getting pissed can mean getting drunk in addition to getting mad.

A parking garage is a parkade.

You go to the washroom instead of the bathroom.

As for spelling it's a hybrid of American and British English. For instance colour, theatre, honour, grey, jewellery, cheque, catologue, draught are just some of the British usages that I've noticed. However Canadians also use tire instead of tyre, and use the letter z (which is pronounced zed instead of zee) in words such as colonize and organize instead of s like in British English.

Also Canadians tend to emphasize their Rs more than I do.
 
Staggerwing
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 5:46 pm

A couple of years ago, I was in my college bookstore buying my textbooks when a young man asked me in a very British accent, "Do you happen to know where the rubbers are." Taken aback for a moment, I replied "The erasers are in the next aisle over." A young lady who overheard us told me that if he had asked her the question, he would have gotton slapped. This little event led me to change my major to Communication Studies.
 
User avatar
sebolino
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:22 pm

The leftenant/lootenant pronunciation of lieutenant is a fascinating one.

Banco,

I'm not sure of that, but seeing the word lieutenant (which is the same in French), I think it's a French word adapted by the British.

Lieu = place (somewhere)
Tenant = keeping, from the verb tenir (to hold or to keep when in the military meaning).

It might explain an unnatural pronunciation.



confirmation: I've just found a web site where they say it means "place holder".
 
Pe@rson
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:14 pm

It's funny, as I believe Australians and New Zealanders use more 'British' words than they do anything else. I vividly remember a fun hour in Cairo (I was there for a month), in which two Canadians, two Australians and a Brit (me) discussed various ways of spelling words. It was very clear that the Australians were far more like Brits than Canadians and certainly Americans.
"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
 
Russophile
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Wed Feb 18, 2004 10:45 pm

Australians have a reasonably pure English vocabularly -- Strine not withstanding however.

What really pisses me off, is that bastardised English is making inroads here -- pick up just about any newspaper here, and you will find they don't use English spellings -- they claim that the necessary software or whatever isn't available -- frankly, it is a crock of shit, because otherwise UK papers would be using the non-English spelling also. For this reason I refuse to read a newspaper anymore -- it is quite pathetic when we want to teach the kids the right and wrong way to speak/write a language, and yet one of the most visible sources of media doesn't do it correctly.

Banco, we don't even need to go back as far as Burton/Taylor -- just look at that god awful sitcom the nanny -- she was out on her fanny -- damn right she was!!  Smile
 
broke
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RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:15 am

Supposedly Winston Churchill is quoted as having said that the British and Americans are two peoples divided by a common language.
In the 1950's and '60's when I started travelling around the US, I found that there were many expressions that were very regional. With TV and the increase in people moving from one part of the country to another, those differences have become less and less.
One of my favorite (favourite) terms is the one New Zealanders (Kiwi's, yes I know) use for an automotive body shop. "Panel Beaters"
Actually that seems to be a much better title that what we use.
In the UK, off track betting parlors (parlours) were called "Turf Accountants". Is that still true?
Personally, I enjoy the differences you find among people across the world in using, supposedly, the same language.
In learning Spanish, while travelling around Latin America, I have found many of the same regional differences that I have found with English.
 
MD-90
Posts: 7835
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2000 12:45 pm

RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:16 am

NO one down here says pop. It's a coke.

Waitress, "Do you want a coke?"
Me, "Sprite, please."

and

"How are you doing?"
"Great, howboutchu?"

It's not an ATV, it's a 4-wheeler
I've always preferred grey over gray myself
We have highways, interstates, and very rare parkway/freeway.
They did put in a traffic circle near MSU's campus, and it's kind of neat. I think of it as a roundabout (all because of Chevy Chase).

And as long as you can say, "Well, in lieu of that..." then it should be lewtenant, not left/looft.
 
ussherd
Posts: 322
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2000 8:01 am

RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:25 am

As Broke just said, the same regional differences definitely exist in Spanish. I just got back from Spain and some of my Venezuelan expressions seemed to be completely undecipherable to a lot of Spaniards, despite the worldwide popularity of Venezuelan soap operas.
Cada loco con su tema...
 
Guest

RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:54 am

Russophile wrote:

"What really pisses me off, is that bastardised English is making inroads here."

When you say "bastardized English," are you referring to American spelling practices? Surely you don't subscribe to the tired old notion that British English is more "proper" than American English, do you? The two are different, but neither can be described as more correct and pure than the other, as they both have their own histories and seperate influences. The differences simply reflect the different cultures and circumstances in which they developed, just as Australian English mirrors Australia's circumstances. That's the beauty of accents, dialects, and languages. If you prefer British spelling to be used in Australia, fine, but I certainly wouldn't call everything else "bastardized English."
 
GDB
Posts: 12653
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 2:13 am

'Turf Accountants' are now much more commonly called 'Betting Shops' or more usually, 'Bookies'.
 
ryangooner
Posts: 956
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:56 am

RE: American English Vs. British English

Thu Feb 19, 2004 2:34 am

The dialects, accents , different words we all use is what makes it so damn interesting to visit and meet the locals in the places we travel to round the world. I love it but.... slang and colloquial meanings/words - im biased but i reckon us Brits have it down to a fine art!!!

Im gonna do one now and pop down the old frog, im hank marvin and i would kill for a plate of lillian dish "n" lucky dips maybe ill chip down the sub and grab a sherbert or two, if im really lucky ill treat meself to a nelson mandella not forgetting to get me old china on the dog and down the frog.The ball and chain trouble and strife can stay back up me gaff unless of course doris puts on a nice whistle, dicky dirt and rhythem n blues - i may just let her bowl down with us!

best language in the world

Ryan
ooh to ooh to be ooh to be a gooner!

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