dtwclipper
Posts: 6668
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 3:17 am

British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:29 am

I realize that many of my fellow posters here at A-net are not native English speakers and although their grasp of the language is outstanding, one thing that always grates on my ears, like finger nails on a chalk board, is the misuse of plurals as well as agreement of adjectives and nouns.

For instance, the Webster's Collegiate Dictionary states that the plural of aircraft is AIRCRAFT . What is the correct usage in British English.

Another major error I see all the time is an incorrect use of MUCH and MANY. Is this a British English thing as well?

For those of you from other countries, please don't bash me on this, I understand how difficult a foreign language can be.

I am Ueber Fluent in German, and still make mistakes, and always will, but strive to get it right one of these days.

Compare New York Air, the Airline that works for your Business
 
iakobos
Posts: 3255
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 6:22 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:39 am

A corrective comment is always appreciated by most non-native Dtw.
In the same vein but westwards, it is rather surprising to see so many native US English speakers did not grasp the meaning of "then" and "than", as well as "to" and "too".
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:46 am

the misuse of plurals as well as agreement of adjectives and nouns

Agree with this one. Adjectives and verbs do not agree with the noun in number and gender in the English language.

And yes, the plural of aircraft is aircraft. Just as the plural of fruit is fruit.

One that really bugs me is they're vs their vs there.

Another one that really gets to me is "If I was Japanese". If takes the subjunctive! "Was" is incorrect. Please use "were"!

There's a lot of differences between English and American, in usage and spelling.

[Edited 2004-08-23 22:49:51]
 
sulman
Posts: 1963
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2004 5:09 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:54 am

The plural of 'aircraft' in 'British English' is indeed 'aircraft'. Although we just tend to call the language 'English' over here.

Edit: I'm not quite sure what differences you're referring to. Aside from some different spellings, the structure is much the same, as far as I know.

[Edited 2004-08-23 23:04:24]
It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
 
Jkw777
Posts: 4427
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2003 11:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:57 am

What is the difference between British English & American English?!  Insane

It's English isn't it?!

Hmmm... Yeah man.

Justin Big grin
jkw6210@btopenworld.com or +447751242989
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:00 am

Sulman & Jkw777

Did you ever hear the joke (maybe it was true, I don't know) about the Yeoman conducting a guided tour of the Tower? He had a large group of tourists, and he was asking then who was from where. When he asked how many were from America, most hands shot up. That's when he asked "Just visiting, or here to learn the language?"
 
mdsh00
Posts: 3968
Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 11:28 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:15 am

Edit: I'm not quite sure what differences you're referring to. Aside from some different spellings, the structure is much the same, as far as I know.

I agree with this. Other than the spelling and colloquialisms, American and British English are not too much different.
"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:23 am

Of course they aren't too much different. But there still are a lot of differences between the two. Spellings are the most obvious ones (sulphur and sulfur). Then we've got vocab. Many words used by one group just aren't used by the other (lorry). Many of the differences are in usage. In English, it's usually "... in hospital" in American, it's "...in the hospital". There's a few subtler usage differences as well. See if you ever notice a newspaper headline. The English one will say "British English vs American English" whilst the American one will say "British English Vs. American English".
 
Klaus
Posts: 20601
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 7:41 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:56 am

I must admit that I´m using a somewhat bastardized mixture of (mostly) US and (only some) british english... But this forum has certainly given me the opportunity to improve by practicing. (I know - too bad for all the poor souls who have to bear the tedium...  Big thumbs up)


By the way: Nobody in Germany uses the word "über" in the way english speakers apparently do. It´s quite as grating as the fingernails-on-blackboard misuse of their / there / they´re...  Wink/being sarcastic
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 7:43 am

Klaus, why so über-sensitive? It's über-cool when foreigners use words like über in their day-to-day conversations, umlauts and all...
 
prosa
Posts: 5389
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2001 3:24 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 7:49 am

And yes, the plural of aircraft is aircraft.

I'm not certain of the British usage, but in the United States "aircraft" is not particularly common. Airplane(s) is heard much more frequently.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
Klaus
Posts: 20601
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 7:41 am

Jasepl

Tue Aug 24, 2004 9:17 am

Jasepl: Klaus, why so über-sensitive? It's über-cool when foreigners use words like über in their day-to-day conversations, umlauts and all...

Consider yourself slapped with a wet and stinky fish.  Smile
 
Matt D
Posts: 8907
Joined: Fri Nov 19, 1999 6:00 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 9:49 am

Imagine two people coming up to you on the street.

The first one says:

"Yo man...gimme some change cuz I is hungry."

Then the second one says:

"Pardon me ol chap, but I would consider it a great honour if you could spare some bloody change so that which I may procure my supper."

Who would you give to?

 Wink/being sarcastic
 
deltaffindfw
Posts: 1384
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2003 7:42 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:04 am


Words mean different things also. Brits go on holiday, American go on vacation. Lift vs elevator. Torch vs flashlight. Water closet vs restroom. Then of course, America is the only country who doesn't realize that football is played with a round ball...

My dad (having learned British English while growing up in India) using to say he was all fagged out (instead of saying tired). Of course, that was in the late 70s/early 80s. Obviously, he wouldn't say that anymore!!
 
WellHung
Posts: 3299
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 8:50 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:11 am

Imagine two people coming up to you on the street.

The first one says:

"Yo man...gimme some change cuz I is hungry."

Then the second one says:

"Pardon me ol chap, but I would consider it a great honour if you could spare some bloody change so that which I may procure my supper."

Who would you give to?


Both of them... as long as they're not Mexican.

Signed,
MattD

[Edited 2004-08-24 03:14:15]
 
mdsh00
Posts: 3968
Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 11:28 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:26 am

Before the Brits start flaming me, I like the American way of spelling better (I'm backed by my parents who grew up with the British system...and they like the American way better too). When Brits spell "colour" why is the "u" not pronounced? At least "color" gets rid of that. Or a better example..."foetus" vs. "fetus"
"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
 
Klaus
Posts: 20601
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 7:41 am

Mdsh00

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:28 am

You´re not trying to tell us there was any kind of consistency in the pronunciation of the english language to begin with, are you? Big grin
 
Matt D
Posts: 8907
Joined: Fri Nov 19, 1999 6:00 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:35 am

Nice attempt at humour (har!), but the reality is that I wouldn't give ANYBODY "spare" change.

Nobody.

Now if someone approaches me and asks for some money because "they are hungry", I will ALWAYS offer to buy them something to eat. Doesn't matter who it is.

In some 15 years of being approached, I have had, exactly two takers, both of which ate the food like they really were starving.

I'll buy someone food. But I sure as hell am not about to give them money. This is because 1) they are looking to buy booze or weed or 2) are these scammers you hear about who lead otherwise "normal" lives, but have turned to panhandling because they think it's more lucrative (and perhaps it is), or both.

Like I said, with as many times as I have been approached and have offered to buy them food, just like they claim they want, the fact that only two people have ever taken me up on it really speaks volumes.
 
mdsh00
Posts: 3968
Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 11:28 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 10:43 am

You´re not trying to tell us there was any kind of consistency in the pronunciation of the english language to begin with, are you?

Haha, nooo. But it seems like sometimes American English is a bit closer to the pronunciation.
"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13916
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:25 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 11:51 am

DTWClipper,

If you say Über fluent it could be confused with überflüssig (surplus)...

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
airplay
Posts: 3369
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 1:58 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 11:58 am

So what is the plural form of "aeroplane"?

 Smile
 
dtwclipper
Posts: 6668
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 3:17 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 12:29 pm

MD11Engineer:

After three years of Intensive study at the Goethe Institute, a Major in German Literature, an apprenticeship in Bavaria, two years in Duesseldorf, 1 year in Basel, and 1 year in Bern, I think I know what I mean.

American writers have a tendency to use the German 'ueber' to demonstrate an extreme ability or affinity for a specific activity, a direct reference to the NSDAP use of the term "uebermensch".

Never the less, thanks for the "infos" as most "euros" incorrectly say.

dtwclipper



Compare New York Air, the Airline that works for your Business
 
paulc
Posts: 1440
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2001 10:42 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 2:52 pm

Brits are unlikely to say 'airplane' but aeroplane or aircraft

Here aircraft are made from Aluminium, in the US it Aluminum.

A well known author (George Bernard Shaw I think) described the relationship between the UK and US as "2 nations divided by a common language"
English First, British Second, european Never!
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 3:05 pm

Why do Americians call Flats Apartments when those flats are located so close together....

And why do the British call Apartments Flats when they are 3 dimensional spaces?
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 3:59 pm

Hey, you can't blame the Brits by saying "Why do they...". It is their language we're using.

And I don't think anyone actually calls it a Water closet!

And, sorry Klaus!
 
soaringadi
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2004 4:56 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:14 pm

There are enormous amounts of differences between American english, and British english..... here are a few :

1. Cookies Vs. Biscuits.

2. house Vs. Bungalow

3. ass Vs. arse

4. neighbor Vs. neighboUr

5. Chopper Vs. Helicopter

6. traffic pattern Vs. circuit.

7. Battery Vs. cells

8. Living room Vs. hall

and many more......

Also there are differences between sentence construction differences too:

American -- I got no money.
Brit -- I do not have any money.

American -- How you doin(g) ?
Brit -- How are you ?

And if you want to give a try heres some African American english :

The doctor tell me I don't need no medicine no more.


And also believe me you don't even want to get into the pronounciations !!

But as a rough rule of thumb it's pretty much the exact opposite of Brit english.

For ex: where it's i for Americans it's ee for the british.
Here's an example : U.S. -- Sem(I) Vs. U.K. Sem(ee)
v(ee)a Vs. v(I)a.

So just have fun  Smile and use any kindA language  Smile




If it ain't Boeing, I'm not going !
 
mdsh00
Posts: 3968
Joined: Mon May 17, 2004 11:28 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:37 pm

Chopper Vs. Helicopter

I don't know about that one because "chopper" is still a slang term for a helicopter as is "ghetto bird."

American -- I got no money.
Brit -- I do not have any money.

American -- How you doin(g) ?
Brit -- How are you ?


I think the American ones depend on region. Most of the people around where I live say it how you've described the British as saying it.

The doctor tell me I don't need no medicine no more.

Errr...


My grandparents often call the living room, the "drawing room" since they were taught in British English. Does Britain still use that term?

okra vs. ladyfingers

eggplants vs. aubergines

eraser vs. rubber (misunderstandings here can result in much hilarity  Laugh out loud)

fries vs. chips

chips vs. crisps

line vs. queue

"i like" vs. "i fancy"

period vs. full stop

check vs. cheque

http://esl.about.com/library/weekly/aa110698.htm
"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
 
jasepl
Posts: 3499
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 3:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:44 pm

Here's another one I don't quite get:

You pay your bill with a cheque. Not the other way around!
 
sulman
Posts: 1963
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2004 5:09 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:08 pm

"I'm going out to smoke a fag" does not mean I'm taking to the streets to murder a homosexual, and "do you have a rubber" is not a request for a prophylactic.
It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 11:56 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 6:35 pm

Ah, the English language. One of my favourite topics!

Just on one point, aluminum and aluminium, it was, I believe, Humphrey Davy who coined the term, and he used aluminum. The word passed straight into usage in the US, but in Britain it was felt that it wasn't consistent with other elements, i.e. sodium, potassium, lithium etc and so the extra "i" was added. You could make a very strong case for saying that it is the Americans, not the British, who have it right.

As for general spelling, it should be remembered that changes to colour/color and the like were meant to be only the first stage of a supposed cleaning up of the phonetics and spelling of the English language. Nor were the Americans the first to do this as there are examples of the same throughout English language history. English was an underground language for a couple of centuries, and developed unchecked. This is actually somewhat ironic, as the magnificent, beautiful English manuscripts from the 8th century are in fact the oldest documents in existence of a modern European language, and Beowulf is the first literary epic in an identifiable modern tongue, though of course, if you try to read it you will struggle! English was the first of them, who'd have though it, eh?

Once again, however, the changes were doomed to failure, with only a few words sticking in the lexicon. Essentially, whenever anyone has tried this (and it was the with the very best of intentions in the US) it has ended up creating greater confusion, as we now have multiple spellings of the same words, the last thing that was intended.

The parochial attitude that one nation's English is somehow better than another is utter nonsense. The whole Webster inspired usage and pronunciation of East coast US English was down to those early Americans who felt that they were the bastions of "proper" English usage. It was their view that the great and mighty English tongue was being debased and abused in its homeland, and it was up them to save it and provide a new standard (food for thought for those who feel American English is somehow inferior). They were utterly appalled as the people moved west and a whole new word-hoard arrived into English.

But slang is constant wherever. The common view is that American English is becoming dominant (this is where the disdain many snobbish people show is evident), but it isn't as simple as that. English grows and swaps words throughout the English speaking world (and outside it too). The British provide vast numbers of new words that Americans use, and vice versa.

Quite frequently people are totally unaware of it. "Internet" is an American term, "World wide web" is a British one. "Gotten" is not an American term at all, merely an English one that died out of use here (you could say it was forgotten), but was retained in the US. "Ass" might be American, and "arse" British, but you hear both Brits using "ass" and Americans using "arse"; in both cases the people are aware that they are deliberately using a word from the other side of the Atlantic. This happens everyday with other words when they are not aware of it.

The whole beauty of the language is that it freely borrows from everyone and everywhere. The level of Australian input into English use around the world is absolutely huge and is constant. Over the last decade "uni" for "university" has caught on in Britain, and has a toe hold in the US as well.

This has always happened. The differences where they are are fascinating. "Titbit" in England became "tidbit" in the US because of prudish American tendencies. Likewise the American re-naming of the tit family of birds.

Americans do not shorten words for the sake of it where other people don't. Abbreviations occur everywhere. The reason Americans use "don't" rather than "doesn't" a lot of the time actually stems from the black slaves, who, forced to converse in a common language alien to them, chopped out a lot of nuances that were unnecessary to their everyday existence. Their usage and terminology caught on. One of the best example you can see of this occurs in the everyday speech of the US deep south. It was one of the most beautiful of ironies that the likes of the Ku Klux Klan were talking in a way hugely influenced by the slaves. I must emphasise here that this is not "bad" English, merely a progression of usage. Anyone who studies Gullah can see that it is an extraordinarily rich language in its own right.

Now, as for what is good and what is bad, you have to ask yourself why. Who says so? English developed through its usage, not through any clearly defined set of rules. By the Victorian period, various academics tried to formulate rules for English. The trouble is, there really aren't any. So they grafted Latin rules onto English, a Germanic language. This is why you have the nonsense about not splitting infinitives. You can't split an infinitive in Latin because it is only one word. You can in English because it is two. Celebrate that flexibility.

Now, there are some who say English is partly Latin based. That isn't true. English has a great many words borrowed from Latin, some from Norman French, some directly imported (I must add here that there is no evidence that any Latin whatsoever came directly into early English - it all came a thousand years later) from the 18th century onwards. Latin words are not used in everyday English, we use them to increase our vocabulary, not change our structure - the key to a language is structure, and English is pure Anglo-Saxon. Essentially, for day to day things, we can use old English only. Some of you will find that hard to believe I know, but here's a wonderful example:

Everyone knows Churchill's "We will fight them on the beaches" speech. Churchill was a renowned expert on the progeny of English, so is it a co-incidence that his entire text consisted solely of old English, with the exception of the final word? "Surrender" is the one non-Anglo-Saxon word. It is French.  Big grin OK (now there's a wonderful American contribution by the way), I'm teasing, but the point is well-made. Churchill chose everyday English speech to deliver his message. Norman French and Latin add the bells and whistles. Old English is the core.

So what do I hate? Not much really. I do tend to know about how English has developed, and what irritates a lot of other people gives me a lot of pleasure because I know where it came from. I suppose the one thing that cause is me mild irritation is when people use "less" when they mean "fewer". That's about all though.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
prosa
Posts: 5389
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2001 3:24 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Tue Aug 24, 2004 11:02 pm

"Ass" might be American, and "arse" British, but you hear both Brits using "ass" and Americans using "arse"; in both cases the people are aware that they are deliberately using a word from the other side of the Atlantic.

"Arse" is sometimes used as a slight euphemism in the United States, being considered a bit less vulgar than "ass."
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 11:56 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 12:19 am

Really? that's interesting PROSA, because people here use "ass" instead of "arse" for exactly the same reason.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13916
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:25 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 12:53 am

Funny, in Ireland the term "ass" was mostly used meaning a male donkey!

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 11:56 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 1:04 am

Oh, indeed Jan. That's what it historically meant here too, and was used as a term of abuse - "You ass" meant "you idiot" when meaning a donkey just as much as when meaning a backside! It's relatively recently that the alternative meaning has gained parlance. That's partly the reason why it can be deemed an acceptable alternative to "arse", because the user can claim they are using it in the original sense.
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
prosa
Posts: 5389
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2001 3:24 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 2:50 am

re: American use of "arse" as a mild euphemism
Really? that's interesting PROSA, because people here use "ass" instead of "arse" for exactly the same reason.

That's not surprising. A "foreign" usage can make a harsh word seem a little less so. I've heard of the Italian "fongool" being used as a euphemism for the "F word" in the United States even though the meaning's the same.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
 
kellmark
Posts: 542
Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2000 12:05 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 5:39 am

Although I am American, I admire the English spoken by the Brits.

My "favourite" is "humped zebra crossing".
 
AA7771stClass
Posts: 288
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 1999 9:26 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 6:30 am

So my question regards the use of verbs in the States vs. the U.K. I've never understood why but it never fails that our fellow speakers across the oceans use "are" for many things. Even though Virgin Airways seems plural, shouldn't it still be "is". Just a little comment, it seems like it's always written as "BA are buying 15 777's"... I see British Airways as 1 airline therefore "BA is buying 15 777's.
 
whitehatter
Posts: 5180
Joined: Sat Jun 12, 2004 6:52 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 6:53 am

I always find American use of the word "fanny" to be amusing.

To them it's someone's rear end, to us it's something an awful lot ruder  Wow!

(same area, think female anatomy)
Lead me not into temptation, I can find my own way there...
 
worldoftui
Posts: 1054
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:18 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 7:19 am

I always find American use of the word "fanny" to be amusing.

To them it's someone's rear end, to us it's something an awful lot ruder

(same area, think female anatomy)


A fanny pack anyone?  Big grin

Oh dear.....


Mark
 
Skyway1
Posts: 977
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:15 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 7:44 am

It's funny.....when I lived in Wisconsin the folks up there called water fountains 'bubblers'. I had a professor that was from the hills of North Carolina and one day he asked the class "what the hell is a bubbler?????" I was as lost as he was. The people that I inquired about this said a water fountain to them is something found in the middle of a park.

Working at the airport I always tend to say queue instead of line.....don't know why....never had anybody say anything to me about it.

Chris
KNUK, KNUK, KNUK woowoowoo
 
LH423
Posts: 5868
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 1999 6:27 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 8:37 am

Re: Fanny pack. Working for a British company I was up at the gate one evening when someone turned in a fanny pack. I started making announcement regarding the lost item. I then stopped dead in my tracks as along with my 150 British passengers, there were at least another 150 on another airline departing from a neighbouring gate. I had to think quickly of an alternative or face the snickering of 300 Brits knowing what I meant, but still thinking it funny that I just said "fanny".

LH423
« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
 
Banco
Posts: 14343
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 11:56 pm

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 6:11 pm

Well, that particular confusion caused an incident when filming a movie. The American director asked Richard Burton to grab Elizabeth Taylor's fanny; he did precisely what he thought he's been asked....and the footage, though apparently wildly entertaining, ended up on the cutting room floor.  Big grin
She's as nervous as a very small nun at a penguin shoot.
 
StarCruiser
Posts: 294
Joined: Fri May 07, 2004 12:12 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 10:19 pm

When considering the differences in other languages I am very grateful to be an English speaker. While it is true there are some regional differences in our language, we can understand one another quite well compared to speakers of other languages. In the case of the British as well as the Americans, to say nothing of our Australian and South African friends, the uneducated are always difficult to understand. I have no problem with those who use correct grammar regardless of their accent. Those who insist on incorrect usage are only making their own lives difficult. Who would hire someone who couldn't speak or write correctly? I certainly wouldn't.

I worked with a man (chap/bloke/guy/dude) from Sri Lanka who used to amuse me with his British usage. He often spoke of doing something straightaway, and I understood what he meant, though I would use the more familiar American term right away. He would travel to his homeland annually on what we both termed his holiday. We did have one amusing experience. He asked me for a rubber one day, and I thought it a bit odd, as he was 70. He meant a rubber band.
 
prosa
Posts: 5389
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2001 3:24 am

RE: British English Vs. American English

Wed Aug 25, 2004 10:29 pm

In the case of the British as well as the Americans, to say nothing of our Australian and South African friends, the uneducated are always difficult to understand.

Perfect example: the movie Trainspotting.
"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 2707200X and 9 guests