ACB777
Topic Author
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Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2003 6:16 am

Gmat Exam

Sat Mar 10, 2007 2:14 pm

Has anyone here written the GMAT exam? What was it like? Was it difficult? Whats the hardest part?

I've tried some of the free online questions. I'm finding the verbal questions a little more difficult than the math (which I find very easy). Are the verbal questions similar to those available online? Did you feel there was plenty of time to do the verbal questions? Was it hard to score above 700? I know some people who aren't very smart who scored ~695.

I understand the score is based on the results of others? Is it based on the results of others taking the test at the same time as you at the same location as you?

[Edited 2007-03-10 06:24:22]
 
N1120A
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RE: Gmat Exam

Sat Mar 10, 2007 3:30 pm

Quoting ACB777 (Thread starter):
I understand the score is based on the results of others? Is it based on the results of others taking the test at the same time as you at the same location as you?

Yes.

I can't speak to the GMAT, but I can speak to the similar LSAT as far as how to prepare. I would go to a professional test prep company that specializes in certain tests. Kaplan and Princeton Review are a backup, but it would be better to go with someone like Testmasters (the L.A., not Texas based company) that are more intensive when it comes to preparation.
Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
 
Kay
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Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2002 3:41 pm

RE: Gmat Exam

Sun Mar 11, 2007 2:36 am

The GMAT is very simple if you do 5 real time samples. I forgot all about it now but there was very known editor that made GMAT samples that are simply harder than the real thing. On the other hand, the organization that prepares the GMAT also gives out samples. You need to know that those are slightly easier than the real exam but closer in the number of questions and topics. Do from both. The only way to ensure your max is to prepare 5 samples at least (yes 5 times 4 hours). I got 90 percentile from the first time but still had room for improvement I think.

The real exam works as follows: the more you answer correctly, the harder the questions get untilyou can't manage ansewring them anymore. If you do notice an increasing difficulty, it means you're doing excellent. On the other hand, if the questions remain marginally easy, it means that you're not moving into a higher level of difficulty due to some wrong answers. Questions aren't all equal. Easy onces answered correctly don't bring much but cost much more if answered incorrectly, whereas difficult questions not answered correctly don't cost much, but if answered correctly bring alot. Questions bring more poinrts with them as they become more difficult.

The verbal questions are ridiculously difficult, whereas the math questions evolve around the same kind of questions (once you've done 5 samples) that reveal themselves ridiculously easy. But what matters is the final score.
I take this exam very seriously (as well as the GRE) because it simply decides which university you will end up in afterwards.

The grade is directly proportional to where you stand compared to the thousands of students that took the same exam the same day in your time zone.


Kay
 
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RE: Gmat Exam

Sun Mar 11, 2007 7:58 am

Quoting ACB777 (Thread starter):
Has anyone here written the GMAT exam? What was it like? Was it difficult? Whats the hardest part?

Took it twice...it's computerized, now. More than anything, it's a test of stamina, i.e. how long you can stay focused on a variety of verbal and quantitative subjects. And yes, the ability to do so is key to sucess in B-school. I'm halfway through it now.

As mentioned, the first question in each section is of medium difficulty..half will get it right, half will get it wrong. If you get it right, the questions become more difficult, until you get one wrong, then it gets a little easier. So, if you get the first 10-15 questions right on each section, you can plan on getting a good score.

I took a prep. class, then took the test and got a 370. Took off 8 months to regroup and basically changed the way I studied. I realized the best way was just to become very comfortable and alert for a 3.5 hour test (4 once you add in breaks, etc.) by taking many, many, many full-length sample tests could handle. I then took it again, and got a 460. Usually a 90 point positive swing is very rare, it's usually 30. Anyway, the essays were the easiest...got a 5.5 on those. Verbal is more my thing, and I ended up getting right at the average (mean) for that section. I scored in the 20th percentile for math. I was admitted on probation to the school of my choice, and once I showed I had a 3.0 or better for the first 9 credits, that was removed, and I've never looked back. I have about a 3.55 now...I take a quantitative and a qualitative class each quarter. If I can get an A in the verbal/written class and a B in the quantitative, that gives me a 3.5. Based on my overall GPA, it's a strategy that's clearly working for me.

The biggest problem is that you have to understand how the test takers write the questions. It's basically high school english and math, but the way it's asked (i.e. data sufficiency, sentence correction, logic, etc.) is what is the most challenging.

Quoting ACB777 (Thread starter):
I understand the score is based on the results of others?

Your overall raw score for each section is compared against the overall mean on each section, and those two scores helps to determine your final number, i.e. 500, etc. I think the national mean is around a 527. Most b-schools who require the GMAT want you to have a 500 minimum GMAT, and the nationally ranked schools like Harvard, Stanford, N'Western, etc. want a 700+ though they don't come out and say that specifically.

Quoting Kay (Reply 2):
The grade is directly proportional to where you stand compared to the thousands of students that took the same exam the same day in your time zone.

That's news to me, but I'm sure they do look at how students do on a regional basis, and depending on test date. I'll take your word for it!

Back to studying for my Finance final...  Smile

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