United Airline
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The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 5:39 am

I went on Oceania Insignia and I did Argentina, Uruguay, Falkland Islands, Chile.

The sea was VERY rough while we cruised at Cape Horn and from Port Stanley, Falkland Islands to Ushuaia, Argentina. Is this one of the roughest if not the roughest sea conditions on earth?

Port Stanley to Ushuaia=part of Cape Horn?
 
ArmitageShanks
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 6:14 am

They don't call it the roaring 40's for no reason!

That area is well known in the sailing community for its brutal seas.
 
skytrain
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 8:35 am



Quoting ArmitageShanks (Reply 1):
They don't call it the roaring 40's for no reason!

Not to mention the furious fifties!

Hey UA,

How did you enjoy your journey? I have always been interested taking such a trip!

As far as the passage goes, apart from the notorious wind, waves and currents present around Cape Horn I believe that ice (even in the summer months) is also a major concern for vessels making passages that far south - ie. below 50S.

Skytrain.
 
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DocLightning
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:22 am



Quoting United Airline (Thread starter):
The sea was VERY rough while we cruised at Cape Horn and from Port Stanley, Falkland Islands to Ushuaia, Argentina. Is this one of the roughest if not the roughest sea conditions on earth?

Been there myself in college on a science mission to collect lichen samples. VERY rough. Interestingly, I am apparently immune to sea-sickness. There was one day when I felt a bit off, but otherwise, I was fine. Never even occurred to me that I might get nauseated.

And the weather was such that even some of the Russian crew looked a bit green that second day!

Yes, those straits are feared by most ship captains. Sinkings happen there. Huge, triangular waves form as the Atlantic and Pacific meet at the straits of Magellan. Tankers have broken in two. It's one of the reasons the Panama Canal was built. Because not only is it a long trip around the southern tip of South America, but it's also a wee touch dangerous.

We encountered no ice for the first day-and-a-half out of Usuaia and we were making about 16 kts. Late on the afternoon of the second day, maybe 30-32 hours out of port, I saw the Flying Dutchman. But she turned out to be a large tunnel in the first iceberg I'd seen; the iceberg blending into the horizon, leaving a dark, rectangular shape on the horizon that looked startlingly like an oncoming ship. And thus, I was the first man to sight ice.

This was during December, though. I'm sure there's ice a lot further north during July. I don't even want to think about what it must be like down in Usuaia during July. Brrr!
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
skytrain
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 5:39 pm



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 3):
This was during December, though. I'm sure there's ice a lot further north during July.

Definitely true - I've heard that ice can get as far north as 40S during July/August!

Skytrain.
 
lowrider
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 5:53 pm



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 3):
don't even want to think about what it must be like down in Usuaia during July.

Tolerable in August, and in the words of Buzz Aldrin, magnificent desolation. I am not given to verse, but that place could even inspire me.
Proud OOTSK member
 
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DocLightning
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Wed Oct 22, 2008 6:22 pm



Quoting Lowrider (Reply 5):

Tolerable in August, and in the words of Buzz Aldrin, magnificent desolation. I am not given to verse, but that place could even inspire me.

I thought that about Antarctica. Just sublime. I'll never forget when we were cruising along some fjord watching the scenery go by when there was a sound like a bunch of gun shots. We all turned to see an avalanche come down the walls of the fjord and into the water just behind us. What an awesome experience.

You get a lot of free time on a ship like that if you're a molecular biologist. In order to actually do molecular biology lab work, you need the ship to be sitting perfectly still. You can't run a centrifuge on a rocking ship (it would rip itself apart) or run a gel (the buffer would slosh all over the tank). So unless we were sitting still at anchor in a very calm harbor, there was no lab work to do. Just collect samples and pop them in the freezer.
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
United Airline
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RE: The Sea Condition At Cape Horn

Sun Oct 26, 2008 3:45 pm

I was on Oceania Insignia around Cape Horn and it was very rough.

If I was on Grand Princess, Freedom of the seas or bigger ships will it be more stable?

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