andz
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Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 7:49 pm

Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 10:17 am

No that is not a typo. I have lost count of the number of times I have seen professional spelled this way on signs, adverts, vehicles... the latest was this morning, in letters a foot high: "Your Walling Proffesionals".

How professional can a company be if they can't even spell the word? Even worse, how professional is the sign company that takes a customer's money and delivers this?

Just my little Saturday morning rant  Smile
After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
 
don81603
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RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 10:37 am

If I had a nickle for every stupid mistake I've seen on signs, I'd be a millionaire. It almost scares me, the level of (or lack there of) spelling that the "halls of higher learning" are turning out these days... People are always getting "there, they're and their" screwed up, as well as "your, you're, our, are, to, too and two, sew, so", etc. The worst offender, in my opinion, and I actually called them on it, and forced them to honour the advertised price was Mike Mart in Thunder Bay, who advertised on a huge banner:
"1L Eggnog, .99 cents"
For those of you who may have missed it, the price was .99 cents, as in less than a penny. What they MEANT to say was $.99

Along the same lines, I have seen some funny signs as well... "The boss told me to change the sign, so I did", "Answer when your onion rings", and too many more to list.
Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.
 
Alessandro
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RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 10:46 am

Common misspelling in Swedish too.
From New Yorqatar to Califarbia...
 
Goldenshield
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RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:39 am

How about the record amount of apostrophe abuse lately?

- Using the apostrophe to pluralize something that is not an acronym, or out of context, i.e.; normal nouns, like cat, car, etc. Now, depending on whose standard you subscribe to, using the previously mentioned ways is okay. So, you could say ATM's, or ATMs (without apostrophe). When used out of context, you are using one word to describe something else, so, let's say that you sell keychains of various shapes. If someone were to type to you, "Can I have one of the bat's?" it would be okay, as you are not referring to a bat (animal, or baseball,) but instead to a keychain shaped like a bat.

- Using the apostrophe incorrectly in the possessive form of the pronoun 'it', i.e.; it's. This one is at least understandable with the logic, as normal nouns use 's (Tom's, Cat's) to indicate the possessive, but people forget that 'it' is a pronoun, and an apostrophe would often be incorrectly applied; otherwise, you would also have "hi's", "her's", etc. I, too, am guilty of this if I'm in a rush, but I often don't catch it in time to correct it.


Also, while I'm at it, there's the mix-up between the words "lose" and "loose." Sure, they only differ by an extra 'o', but the meanings change drastically.

- Lose: To not win, to not have something in your possession.
- Loose: The opposite of tight.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
Elite
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Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 6:31 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:43 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 3):
apostrophe abuse

That happens way too often, and I have to admit I am guilty of that all the time.
 
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GrahamHill
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RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:57 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 3):
Also, while I'm at it, there's the mix-up between the words "lose" and "loose." Sure, they only differ by an extra 'o', but the meanings change drastically.

- Lose: To not win, to not have something in your possession.
- Loose: The opposite of tight.

For a long time now, we've been using this English word in the French language. All French write, for example: "C'est un looser" (He's a loser)  banghead 
"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
 
Goldenshield
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Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2001 3:45 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:48 pm



Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 5):
For a long time now, we've been using this English word in the French language. All French write, for example: "C'est un looser" (He's a loser)

Since the Latin languages pronounce things different than the Germanic languages, that spelling is at least tolerable, as it retains the original pronounciation as the (American) English word.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
andz
Posts: 7624
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 7:49 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:05 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 3):

I thought that was something that was unique to this country. It is not uncommon to see a combination of correct and incorrect plurals in the same sentence or on the same sign.

That irritates me as much if not more than the professional misspelling.
After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
 
RussianJet
Posts: 5982
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 4:15 am

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:37 pm

I live near Stansted airport, and a roadsign between home and the airport directs you to 'Stanstead' airport. GGGGGGRRRRRRRRRRRRR!
✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
 
EWRCabincrew
Posts: 4306
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 2:37 am

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:57 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 6):
that spelling is at least tolerable

Bad spelling is never tolerable, especially with the resources available online.

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 6):
as it retains the original pronounciation as the (American) English word.

Loser, the 's' is a 'z' sound. Looser, the 's' is an 's' sound.
You can't cure stupid
 
johns624
Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:09 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 6:29 pm



Quoting Don81603 (Reply 1):
If I had a nickle for every stupid mistake I've seen on signs, I'd be a millionaire

Usually written "nickel"... Smile
My personal gripe is "lead" and "led". They are pronounced the same when "lead" is a metal but not when it's the present form of "led".
 
Goldenshield
Posts: 5005
Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2001 3:45 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 6:33 pm



Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 9):
Loser, the 's' is a 'z' sound. Looser, the 's' is an 's' sound.

That depends on the locality. For where I'm from, it's sounds like "Loo - sir."

Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 9):
Bad spelling is never tolerable, especially with the resources available online.

Compared to the mass tragedy to grammar and spelling that the internet, chat rooms, and text messaging has ignited, an extra letter added to a word by someone where English isn't even their first language is completely tolerable to me.

Besides, how many Americans do you know that can spell, let alone pronounce properly, the title of Victor Hugo's famous novel Les Misérables.

Or, how about Spanish? If an English-only American heard someone pronounce the title of Don Quixote, what percentage would spell it properly?
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
EWRCabincrew
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Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 2:37 am

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:03 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 11):
Besides, how many Americans do you know that can spell, let alone pronounce properly, the title of Victor Hugo's famous novel Les Misérables.

Or, how about Spanish? If an English-only American heard someone pronounce the title of Don Quixote, what percentage would spell it properly?

Maybe a few might not, but with the resources available to everyone, being a bad speller is a poor excuse. English or not. If you can text, IM, skype or facebook (what have you), you can google (or any other venue) to get the right spelling to make you look credible. Even here there is a check spelling feature.

Maybe I set the bar too high.  Smile

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 11):
That depends on the locality. For where I'm from, it's sounds like "Loo - sir."

That may be, but accents aside, loser with a 'z' sound is probably the more common (widespread useage) pronunciation.
You can't cure stupid
 
RussianJet
Posts: 5982
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 4:15 am

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:19 pm



Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 12):
That may be, but accents aside, loser with a 'z' sound is probably the more common (widespread useage) pronunciation.

 checkmark 
It is the standard pronunciation. Look in a dictionary at the phonetic spelling and that's what it'll say.
✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
 
johns624
Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:09 pm

RE: Proffesional (sic)

Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:32 am

Ordnance/ordinance. He broke a local ordinance by having military ordnance in his basement.

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