AKLDELNonstop
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IMac Question

Sat Jul 04, 2009 11:55 pm

Hello,

So my Toshiba laptop has finally died (RIP) after three years of average service. Having used my iPhone for a year, I feel a Mac is the natural next step. Here, I have two choices, the MacBook Pro 15inch or the iMac 24inch.

My preference is the iMac, but here's the problem. I will soon be relocating countries - moving to India for a while. The most obvious solution would be to buy the iMac in India. However, I think iMac in India is far more expensive than NZ (correct me if I am wrong). So is it realistic buying one here and taking it to NZ or is it likely to be damaged in the cargo hold of the flight.

Any suggestions to what can be done?
 
Curtisman
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:22 am

If you get the iMAC, keep the box and packaging that it arrives in. It is actually quite compact. A lot of MAC's are shipped - I had my 2 MacBook Pro's and my iMAC shipped to me. So they are flown all over - keep the packing and mark fragile and you should have no worries. I would insure them over and above the regular airline insurance though.


Cheers!
Citizen of the World
 
AKLDELNonstop
Topic Author
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:25 am

Thanks CurtisMan. Good point about the insurance.

Another question I have about iMacs is - can it be used as a TV, ie is there anyway to connect analog tv signals to iMac using some sort of adapter.

If you need to watch Blue Ray discs on iMacs, how would you do it?
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:59 am



Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 2):
Another question I have about iMacs is - can it be used as a TV, ie is there anyway to connect analog tv signals to iMac using some sort of adapter.

The most popular TV solution is from Elgato. They've got tuners for most TV standards. I'm using a USB dual tuner for DVB as my primary TV and DVR. There are a few other solutions as well, however.

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 2):
If you need to watch Blue Ray discs on iMacs, how would you do it?

Apple currently doesn't support BluRay video, primarily because BluRay would force its draconian DRM on all aspects of the operating system.

You can of course connect a BluRay drive to a Mac, but you'll need to run Windows on it if you want to watch BluRay videos at this point.
 
AKLDELNonstop
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:15 am

Thanks Klaus

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
The most popular TV solution is from Elgato. They've got tuners for most TV standards. I'm using a USB dual tuner for DVB as my primary TV and DVR. There are a few other solutions as well, however.

Hmm. I will have to find out whether this will work in India. Not sure whether the Pay TV system there allows external boxes. Hopefully some of the India based members can answer.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
You can of course connect a BluRay drive to a Mac, but you'll need to run Windows on it if you want to watch BluRay videos at this point.

I see. I suppose it will have to be HD content from iTunes for the moment then. This is not something I particularly mind because they make it a breeze to buy anything and the prices are reasonable.
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:21 am



Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 4):
I see. I suppose it will have to be HD content from iTunes for the moment then. This is not something I particularly mind because they make it a breeze to buy anything and the prices are reasonable.

I'd be surprised if that wasn't a secondary reason for Apple to not rush towards BlueRay support...

The resolution of the iTunes HD content is not as high as on BD (720 vs. 1080), but that's probably just a matter of time and growing online bandwidths.
 
AverageUser
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 3:46 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 3):
Apple currently doesn't support BluRay video, primarily because BluRay would force its draconian DRM on all aspects of the operating system.

The real reason being that Jobs just does not like it: http://www.engadget.com/2008/10/14/s...-jobs-calls-blu-ray-a-bag-of-hurt/
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 4:18 pm



Quoting AverageUser (Reply 6):
The real reason being that Jobs just does not like it: http://www.engadget.com/2008/10/14/s...hurt/

If you actually read the full statement it becomes clear that there are reasons for Jobs "not liking" BluRay at this point. BluRay licensing currently mandates the full subjection of the OS under the BluRay DRM and comes with all kinds of other problems which Apple is not willing to accept.

Especially given the fact that physical media are a dying format in the medium term and Apple already offers HD video online Apple is in a good position to stand back until the BluRay association (of which Apple is a member) either removes some of the burden or becomes irrelevant anyway.
 
Goldenshield
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:04 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 7):
Especially given the fact that physical media are a dying format in the medium term and Apple already offers HD video online Apple is in a good position to stand back until the BluRay association (of which Apple is a member) either removes some of the burden or becomes irrelevant anyway.

Even though I'm Windows/Linux guy, I don't blame Apple one bit, as they were ultimately outvoted on the integrated DRM issue. I'm surprised that Microsoft didn't at least help with the standard, but given that they were busy with the European courts at the time, I don't blame them for not getting involved. All in all, this is a product of the movie industry. They have become like the RIAA, in that they are predatorial, and will protect their young at all costs.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
AverageUser
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RE: IMac Question

Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:35 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 7):
If you actually read the full statement it becomes clear that there are reasons for Jobs "not liking" BluRay at this point.

I can see I'm talkin' to Klaus again and "not reading stuff", the "full statement" by the Man is:

10:55AM Q: No Blu-ray, and display port -- why no HDMI?

A: Steve: HDMI is limited in resolution. Phil: for typical computer use, display port is the connector of the future.

Steve: "Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt. It's great to watch the movies, but the licensing of the tech is so complex, we're waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace."


Quoting Klaus (Reply 7):
BluRay licensing currently mandates the full subjection of the OS under the BluRay DRM and comes with all kinds of other problems which Apple is not willing to accept.

Since you are always in the know -- what problems of all kinds exactly? What's there so secret about a version of Unix the BluRay folks should not know about?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 7):

Especially given the fact that physical media are a dying format in the medium term and Apple already offers HD video online Apple is in a good position to stand back until the BluRay association (of which Apple is a member) either removes some of the burden or becomes irrelevant anyway.

Read the piece through (my turn now)-- God of Apple says BluRay is taking off later, what's that supposed to tell us? Even Apple don't make money selling stuff in the medium term, but right now in the shops -- or actually do not, as Jobs and his henchmen have chosen to ignore the market drive. But he can probably afford being stiff-lipped and losing a few sales to the "pure PC" camp anyway!
 
swiftski
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 7:47 am

You can get an iLugger if you want to take the iMac with you. Google for details.
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 11:49 am



Quoting AverageUser (Reply 9):
Quoting Klaus (Reply 7):
If you actually read the full statement it becomes clear that there are reasons for Jobs "not liking" BluRay at this point.

I can see I'm talkin' to Klaus again and "not reading stuff", the "full statement" by the Man is:

10:55AM Q: No Blu-ray, and display port -- why no HDMI?

A: Steve: HDMI is limited in resolution. Phil: for typical computer use, display port is the connector of the future.

Steve: "Blu-ray is just a bag of hurt. It's great to watch the movies, but the licensing of the tech is so complex, we're waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace."

"Licensing is complex" in context with BluRay clearly means that Jobs simply doesn't accept the draconian DRM and its consequences.

"we're waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace" pretty obviously means: "We don't need you. Come back to us when you've got a better offer – your DRM will get cracked anyway, so there's no point to ruining our OS for nothing."

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 9):
what problems of all kinds exactly? What's there so secret about a version of Unix the BluRay folks should not know about?

Wrong direction.

The problem is that BluRay imposes strict limitations on the operating system which Apple has no inclination to abide by. Apple always tries to be unimpeded in its own decisions, and letting the BluRay association have the ultimate say would be anathema to Apple and Jobs in particular.

The BluRay DRM is already "mostly" cracked as far as I know, so it is likely that the licensing will become somewhat more liberal down the road.
 
Goldenshield
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:33 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):
your DRM will get cracked anyway, so there's no point to ruining our OS for nothing."

It already is, and has been since at least November.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 4:52 pm



Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 12):
It already is, and has been since at least November.

As far as I know the BD+ level has not been cracked completely yet, and it is to be used for all new titles.
 
7324ever
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 6:00 pm



Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):

My preference is the iMac, but here's the problem. I will soon be relocating countries - moving to India for a while. The most obvious solution would be to buy the iMac in India. However, I think iMac in India is far more expensive than NZ (correct me if I am wrong). So is it realistic buying one here and taking it to NZ or is it likely to be damaged in the cargo hold of the flight.

Look at the good side. Apple has all their tech support there so your not with out help!  duck 

But really I would get it in NZ id imagine it could be cheaper and that if you want you could ship it to your place in India to insure the airlines wont loose it or have it damage (I know its highly unlikely but you never know that "What if" factor)
Anything the US and EU build the Russians do it better! i.e. TU-144 vs Concorde and TU-154 vs The 727...
 
Goldenshield
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 6:27 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 13):
As far as I know the BD+ level has not been cracked completely yet, and it is to be used for all new titles.

According to Wiki, BD+ has been circumvented 3 different times. The latest iteration has not yet.

By definition of that statement, I don't that consider it a crack, but by the simple fact that they could access the media that BD+ was supposed to protect, I do. However, "circumvent" could really mean that it indeed was a crack.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 7:10 pm



Quoting 7324ever (Reply 14):
Look at the good side. Apple has all their tech support there so your not with out help!

No, they don't actually. Apple hasn't followed the (bad) example of many of its competitors.

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 15):
According to Wiki, BD+ has been circumvented 3 different times. The latest iteration has not yet.

Yeah, that's the problem. The crack is still incomplete. A complete crack would not need to be upgraded over time if it covered the entire specification. But that will probably just be a matter of time as well...

The irony of the matter is that many people will simply not buy media unless they are either DRM-free (like digital downloads since a few months) or handily copyable (like DVD). I have no problem paying for stuff I like, I just don't want to have a fragile, inconvenient and limited product that's effectively of lower value than pirated copies made from it.

I may start buying BluRay when it's soundly cracked and thus can be used with some flexibility. For the time being, I'm not interested. If it stays limited and inconvenient for its entire life cycle, I'll easily survive without it as well.
 
AverageUser
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 7:36 pm

Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):
The problem is that BluRay imposes strict limitations on the operating system which Apple has no inclination to abide by.

What limitations? Where can I learn more? What are "the other problems" you said exist? I have folks right now hot for some BluRay notebooks, and I don't want to let them down   ... have never been really deep in the strictly me myself & I mode, but do whatever people ask me to.


Quoting Klaus (Reply 11):


"we're waiting till things settle down and Blu-ray takes off in the marketplace" pretty obviously means: "We don't need you. Come back to us when you've got a better offer – your DRM will get cracked anyway, so there's no point to ruining our OS for nothing."

We are fortunate to have a fluent native Jobs-English interpreter among us! This would have taken me years on my own  

[Edited 2009-07-07 12:46:59]
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 8:57 pm



Quoting AverageUser (Reply 17):
What limitations?

Requiring exclusively manufacturer-signed kernel drivers and a bunch of other tamper-proofing measures for the system, mandatory cutoff or degradation of media output quality if not all conditions should be met and so on.

Effectively, the BluRay association would have the last word, not Apple, about who could contribute what to the operating system, which extensions could be installed and which paths for future development would be allowed or forbidden. Not something I'd particularly relish proposing to Steve Jobs.

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 17):
We are fortunate to have a fluent native Jobs-English interpreter among us! This would have taken me years on my own

It's not rocket science, really, if one knows a bit about Apple's and Jobs' history and priorities.
 
7324ever
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RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 07, 2009 9:49 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 16):
No, they don't actually. Apple hasn't followed the (bad) example of many of its competitors.

Alright I could have sworn they did because I called them and the first thing when someone picked up someone said. "Thank you for calling apple tech support this is (Insert strong American name with heavy Indian accent) how may I be helping you.)

But could have just been a coincidence.
Anything the US and EU build the Russians do it better! i.e. TU-144 vs Concorde and TU-154 vs The 727...
 
AverageUser
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RE: IMac Question

Wed Jul 08, 2009 6:40 am



Quoting Klaus (Reply 18):

Requiring exclusively manufacturer-signed kernel drivers and a bunch of other tamper-proofing measures for the system, mandatory cutoff or degradation of media output quality if not all conditions should be met and so on.

Thanks, I see, Apple does not provide signing of its drivers unlike Windows does, makes sense. Perhaps they should consider it for overall safety reasons?

I really don't understand why player output quality should matter to Jobs as it only affects the player and nothing else, and I presume would be a universal BluRay feature.

But what do you mean by "other tamper-proofing", and the "so on"? If a Mac is able to play BluRay on Windows, I would think all hardware tamper-proofing devices are in place already?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 18):

It's not rocket science, really, if one knows a bit about Apple's and Jobs' history and priorities.

Hmm I have a fringe knowlegde of how Jobs appears to handle things, and I think he misreads the market. Had he switched over to PC-compatible hardware in the 1990s he would be bigger than Gates now. If he knew how to regret, he'd be regretting about his BluRay stance pretty soon. If you Klaus had not translated him into English, I' d have said he seems to have left the backdoor open still.
 
AKLDELNonstop
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RE: IMac Question

Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:21 pm

Thanks for all the replies. There were some good suggestions on transportation, however it is looking like MacBook Pro 13 inch (2.53 Ghz) will be my choice. Main reason is because I will be moving around a lot due to work and that really makes the iMac impractical.

I was pretty set on the Pro and went to do a survey at the local Apple Store (Magnum Mac) and found the text on the MacBook Pros to be blurry and a bit jagged esp at small font sizes. Looked this up on the internet and found this to be an issue other people have found as well.

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=722788

Has anyone faced this problem before. Surely, Apple wouldn't design laptops with basic text display issues. Seems to be a case more on the new unibody laptops. Any insights?
 
Brendan03
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RE: IMac Question

Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:49 pm



Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Thread starter):
My preference is the iMac, but here's the problem. I will soon be relocating countries - moving to India for a while. The most obvious solution would be to buy the iMac in India. However, I think iMac in India is far more expensive than NZ (correct me if I am wrong). So is it realistic buying one here and taking it to NZ or is it likely to be damaged in the cargo hold of the flight.

Hi, I just finished 4 days of work experience at a Mac store today!

Most stores as far as I know get their Apple computer stock in a basic cardboard box with the white packaging inside, I would suggest if you buy one, You ask for all the packaging including the generic cardboard box for that added protection (and then just get fragile stickers when you check it in)

The boss of the store was telling me he had to take some stock interstate and was flying so he just took about 6 (Intel) iMacs (he was with some other staff who all took one as checked luggage) and they came out fine.

The 24" model is definetly very nice -- They're a bit on the awkward to carry side being that we had to put the stock away at nighttime.

but yeah, I think you can conclude that they're travelable but I would suggest getting insurance or seeing what kinda liability the airline takes for damaging fragile equiptment.

Good luck with your decision and I hope my advice is in someway helpful.
Coolier than thou.
 
Klaus
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RE: IMac Question

Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:24 pm



Quoting AverageUser (Reply 20):
Thanks, I see, Apple does not provide signing of its drivers unlike Windows does, makes sense. Perhaps they should consider it for overall safety reasons?

It depends. Driver signing on a Computer only makes sense when the signing institution (in this case Apple) actually performs an intense code audit. Otherwise it is pretty much worthless from a security point of view and is more of a market access control device.

The difference to the iPhone App Store where every app has to be signed by both the developer and Apple to gain access to the Store is in the strict segregation of apps in the iPhone – a security (or other) problem in an App is restricted to only that app, since none of them have kernel access and thus cannot compromise the security of the entire system.

Due to this limited scope of potential problems having all apps double-signed doesn't take a really close code audit on Apple's part but always ensures that a malicious or severely defective app can always be traced back to the developer who had to identify himself legally on acquisition of his Apple-provided Store certificate.

Problems in a driver on a computer – especially in a kernel driver – have a much wider scope and the implications of potential defects are more severe. Allowing only signed drivers would put a much higher auditing burden on Apple if there was to be any security benefit. In practice, the necessity to have drivers signed can even lead to delays in security-relevant updates while they're being audited (ask any iPhone app developer about that!).

This is a tricky proposition, and Microsoft mainly introduced driver signing on behalf of the media industry who wanted to prevent users from accessing the media they've bought in ways the industry didn't like. Security was clearly not the primary concern there.

Apple has so far refused to cripple MacOS X in the same way, and I hope they keep their position on this.

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 20):
I really don't understand why player output quality should matter to Jobs as it only affects the player and nothing else, and I presume would be a universal BluRay feature.

That is incorrect as far as I know. When certain types of media are being played, the entire system switches down to degraded quality if any component does not satisfy the DRM enforcement mechanisms, not just the media player itself.

Given that the BluRay DRM is mostly cracked anyway, this remains a substantial nuisance for the paying customer while pirates are happily ripping perfect copies which have no such impediments and are thus actually more valuable to the user. But since the beginning of the digital age it's been quite obvious that the media industry in its present form is a dinosaur lumbering towards extinction.

And given its antics in recent years, I can only say good riddance!

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 20):
But what do you mean by "other tamper-proofing", and the "so on"? If a Mac is able to play BluRay on Windows, I would think all hardware tamper-proofing devices are in place already?

Only a relatively small part of these are actually in hardware, such as HDMI encryption and BluRay drives with encrypted data streams and DRM handshake. Most of the "guts" of the playback mechanism is in software, and by the harebrained logic of the media industry that means nailing the operating system shut to such an extent that even sophisticated debugging tools would presumably have no chance to get at the unencrypted data streams (again not that this would bother a determined pirate – just annoying and penalizing the paying customer, which is a really smart move).

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 20):
Hmm I have a fringe knowlegde of how Jobs appears to handle things, and I think he misreads the market. Had he switched over to PC-compatible hardware in the 1990s he would be bigger than Gates now.

Macs would then have suffered through the horrendous Pentium CPU generations as well, to which the PowerPC was a rather worthy and often superior alternative. Jobs only switched when Intel threw the dead-end Pentium IV overboard and switched entirely to the Core platform, which was a rather good move under the circumstances.

I'm typing this on an almost 6 years old PowerMac G5 Dual 2GHz (almost maxed out at 7GB of RAM and with dual monitors) which is a substantially more pleasant machine than any of the Pentium PCs of its day. I'm glad that Apple stuck with the PowerPC to this point.

The Core CPUs are another cup of tea – my MacBook Pro is as efficient and powerful as the PowerPCs once were relative to the Pentiums, so I've got no complaints there either.

Quoting AverageUser (Reply 20):
If he knew how to regret, he'd be regretting about his BluRay stance pretty soon. If you Klaus had not translated him into English, I' d have said he seems to have left the backdoor open still.

BluRay still is a niche product. By the time it reaches the market penetration of the DVD (which it may never achieve), the consortium will most probably be forced to relax their DRM demands since it will be readily copyable anyway.

Especially with his rapidly growing online distribution of media content which suits many people better than the acquisition of physical media, Jobs is in no particular hurry to climb aboard.

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 21):
I was pretty set on the Pro and went to do a survey at the local Apple Store (Magnum Mac) and found the text on the MacBook Pros to be blurry and a bit jagged esp at small font sizes. Looked this up on the internet and found this to be an issue other people have found as well.

Rendering text in small sizes on a pixeled device is always a compromise; The Windows compromise is pressing each letter into the pixel matrix with no regard to the actual font (resulting in largely disfigured characters only remotely resembling their actual form), while the Mac compromise is to preserve the actual appearance of the letter as well as possible through anti-aliasing, accepting a reduction of "sharpness" as a result.

Both rendering methods follow their respective priorities and both need some getting used to, but I personally by far prefer the aesthetically pleasant, highly consistent and still very readable Mac rendering to the (in my view) horribly blotchy, scraggly and ugly fit-the-pixel-or-die Windows rendering which reminds me a lot of dot matrix printers of old, with different sizes of the same font often looking completely different and inconsistent.

I experience no noticeable eye strain due to Apple's anti-aliasing, and I've been using Macs for quite a few years now. The transition from one to the other can always require a bit of adjustment, of course.


This page explains the different approaches with graphical examples:
Font smoothing, anti-aliasing, and sub-pixel rendering - Joel on Software

The impact on font scaling and font differentiation is shown very well here:
Font rendering philosophies of Windows and Mac OS X » DamienG
 
AverageUser
Posts: 1824
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 6:21 pm

RE: IMac Question

Tue Jul 21, 2009 12:24 pm



Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Allowing only signed drivers would put a much higher auditing burden on Apple if there was to be any security benefit

But, apparently, they won't be able to run BluRay before they do start using signed drivers, getting back to the issue?
I can't think of a reason why Apple could not audit its own code, but I think I can discern a cultural strain: "what the eck, someone trying to run their code on OUR hardware and with OUR software?"

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
When certain types of media are being played, the entire system switches down to degraded quality if any component does not satisfy the DRM enforcement mechanisms, not just the media player itself.

Makes perfect sense to me, since in BluRay there has to be an unbroken chain of hardware/software security devices. If there were known ways to get a yes/no answer out of you, I'd ask honestly again if a Mac is able to play BluRay while in Windows?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Macs would then have suffered through the horrendous Pentium CPU generations as well, to which the PowerPC was a rather worthy and often superior alternative.

PowerPC? The most infamous dead-end industrial CPU in the world?

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):
Jobs only switched when Intel threw the dead-end Pentium IV overboard and switched entirely to the Core platform, which was a rather good move under the circumstances.

Ha ha hilarious, the brilliance of Jobs again. Like he had had an alternative when his CPU business coalition had melted away. But fine for Intel to have survived under the "pressure" from him et al and to have produced such worthy and competitive CPUs, ha ha.

Quoting Klaus (Reply 23):

BluRay still is a niche product. By the time it reaches the market penetration of the DVD (which it may never achieve), the consortium will most probably be forced to relax their DRM demands since it will be readily copyable anyway.

I think you're taking the intellectual property issue too lightly, and purposefully confusing it with arcane technical aspects. Even if the protection schemes of DVD have been broken, that does not make them "readily copyable". Copyrighted material remains copyrighted material. If you did small-scale software authoring and marketing for living, you might appreciate it more.

You may call me different, perhaps stupid even, but all my copyrighted video and audio material has been bought with straight cash in legal shops. Ok again, we may be a niche group in today's world, but we exist all the same, and it might be tough to explain to some of us why on earth our new shining BluRay disc will not play on a major brand "A" computer ("seems to fit, is it still under warranty?"), but plays on an inferior quality brand X computer ...
 
AKLDELNonstop
Topic Author
Posts: 320
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RE: IMac Question

Sat Jul 25, 2009 3:26 am

Thanks for all the replies. I purchased the 13.3" Macbook Pro on Tuesday. The 2.53 Ghz model with 4GB RAM. So far, it's brilliant.

Also purchased the Apple Wireless mouse, which I must say was a bit below expectations. It keeps disconnecting and isn't the most sensitive mouse out there. I wonder if it's possible to return the mouse to apple (rather the retailer I purchased it from). Have others faced similar issues with the wireless mouse?
 
Klaus
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Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 7:41 am

RE: IMac Question

Sat Jul 25, 2009 8:34 pm



Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 25):
Thanks for all the replies. I purchased the 13.3" Macbook Pro on Tuesday. The 2.53 Ghz model with 4GB RAM. So far, it's brilliant.

Good to hear you're satisfied!  Smile

Just ask if you need help with it.

Quoting AKLDELNonstop (Reply 25):
Also purchased the Apple Wireless mouse, which I must say was a bit below expectations. It keeps disconnecting and isn't the most sensitive mouse out there. I wonder if it's possible to return the mouse to apple (rather the retailer I purchased it from). Have others faced similar issues with the wireless mouse?

I don't use wireless input devices, but I would indeed not expect the mouse to disconnect during normal use. Maybe somebody else around here with concrete experience on your setup can help. You should try regular Apple support next; They're usually pretty good. Check with them what to do next if it still can't be resolved.

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