Falcon84
Topic Author
Posts: 13775
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 11:52 am

Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier: Future

Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:47 am

"Future" not in the fact that it won't be around in Arlington, Virginia. It is one of the most hallowed pices of ground in Arlington, if not the most hallowed, and serves as an emotional reminder for many of the price the U.S. has paid over the years to win and keep it's freedom.

But with modern science and medicine having advanced to where it is now, can anyone honestly see a time when any more of our finest will be deemed "unknown", and placed within the tomb? With DNA evidence, I just can't see it.

In a way, that's a good thing, but on another level, I think the fact we've had unknowns in wars as close as Vietnam is a painful reminder of the price of war, and that it should never be entered into lightly.

Your thoughts?
Work Right, Fly Hard
 
User avatar
LTU932
Posts: 13075
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 12:34 am

RE: Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier: Future

Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:26 pm

Isn't the tomb of the unknown soldier like a symbolic tomb for soldiers who are possibly KIA but who's bodies were never recovered, or simply that they're presumed dead despite being "just" MIA? If that's so, then its fate should be that it stays where it is.
 
User avatar
OA260
Posts: 21117
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:50 pm

RE: Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier: Future

Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:56 pm

Do all nations have a ''Tomb of the unknown soldier'' ?

This is the one is Athens

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
 
jetstar
Posts: 1370
Joined: Mon May 19, 2003 2:16 am

RE: Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier: Future

Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:16 pm

There are servicemen buried in the tomb, but the last interred, for the Vietnam war was removed and identified through DNA and reburied near his home, here is the article from Wikipedia

The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It stands on top of a hill overlooking Washington, D.C.
One of the more popular sites at the Cemetery, the tomb is made from Yule marble quarried in Colorado. It consists of seven pieces, with a total weight of 79 short tons (72 metric tons). The tomb was completed and opened to the public April 9, 1932, at a cost of $48,000.
It was initially named the "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier." Other unknown servicemen were later entombed there, and it became known as the "Tomb of the Unknowns", though it has never been officially named. The soldiers entombed there are:

Unknown Soldier of World War I, interred November 11, 1921. President Warren G. Harding presided.

Unknown Soldier of World War II, interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight D. Eisenhower presided.

Unknown Soldier of the Korean War, also interred May 30, 1958. President Dwight Eisenhower presided again, Vice President Richard Nixon acted as next of kin.

· Unknown Soldier of the Vietnam War, interred May 28, 1984. President Ronald Reagan presided. The remains of the Vietnam Unknown were disinterred, under the authority of President Bill Clinton, on May 14, 1998, and were identified as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael J. Blassie, whose family had him reinterred near their home in St. Louis, Missouri. It has been determined that the crypt at the Tomb of the Unknowns that contained the remains of the Vietnam Unknown will remain empty.

The Tomb of the Unknowns is perpetually guarded by the U.S. Army. The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment ("The Old Guard") began guarding the Tomb April 6, 1948.

With DNA tracking today, I doubt there will be another unknown soldier buried there.

JetStar
 
CPH-R
Posts: 6059
Joined: Thu May 03, 2001 5:19 pm

RE: Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier: Future

Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:50 pm



Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
But with modern science and medicine having advanced to where it is now, can anyone honestly see a time when any more of our finest will be deemed "unknown", and placed within the tomb? With DNA evidence, I just can't see it.

Won't happen, simply because the way warfare is being waged has changed so much. The savagery of warfare in WW1 and WW2 (especially in the pacific theater and the eastern front) did a lot to render a lot of bodies indistinguishable, leading to them being buried as unknown soldiers. And with DNA technology still being light years away, there was no way anyone was going to find out who they were.

Just look at places like Menin Gate and Thiepval Memorial, where you have over a 100,000 names of soldiers missing, presumed dead.

And then of course there's the story of when France wanted to bury their own 'Soldat inconnu', they sent burial parties out to 7 of the main French battlefields with instructions to recover a body each. In the end they were only able to recover 6, since they found that at the last battlefield (suspected to be Verdun), it was impossible to determine which body was French and which was German, owing to the fierce close quarters combat and territory switching side repeatedly.

Quoting Falcon84 (Thread starter):
think the fact we've had unknowns in wars as close as Vietnam is a painful reminder of the price of war

Off the top of my head, they were only able to locate two 'unknown' bodies in Vietnam, and there was some suggestion that they may have been slacking a fair bit in trying to identify the one they chose, in order to continue the tradition of an unknown.

Quoting OA260 (Reply 2):
Do all nations have a ''Tomb of the unknown soldier'' ?

There are a fair few of them about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomb_of_the_Unknown_Soldier

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: WarRI1 and 13 guests