aero145
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Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:05 pm

Hey guys!

Before I start: Yes, I tried searching for this topic in the archive, but I didn’t find anything.

As you know, there are some different spellings of English out there. The main ones are, as far as I know:

American spelling (analyze, synthesize, organization, draft, curb, tire, centered, ameba, esthetics, color)
British* spelling (analyse, synthesise, organisation, draught, kerb, tyre, centred, amoeba, aesthetics, colour)
Oxford spelling (same as British, with the exception of -ize and -iza {synthesize, organization})
Canadian spelling (analyze, synthesize, organization, draft, curb, tire, centred, ameba, aesthetics, colour)

[* = also used in former British colonies with the exception of Canada

This is a tiny example of the differences.

So the question: Non-native English speakers, which spelling to you use/prefer and why?

Until I was about 14, I had no idea which variant I used, so I researched a bit, and saw an overview of the differences. Since then I started using the British spelling. In school I first learned the American variant, then the British, and after that it was up to me to write correctly – as in, not mix up the different spelling variants.

Looking forward to seeing your replies,

Dave   

[Edited 2011-03-07 07:15:09]
 
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GrahamHill
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:11 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):
Non-native English speakers, which spelling to you use/prefer and why?

I use (or try to use) the Oxford spelling, because it is the English I have learnt in school  
"A learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant one" - Moliere
 
AM744
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:12 pm

American for the most part. Except for amoeba and aesthetics, perhaps because I studied English at British founded institutions. I'd guess you'd get a different result if you asked a Frenchman or Dutchman who'd probably be more influenced by the British spelling.
 
aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:16 pm

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 1):
I use (or try to use) the Oxford spelling, because it is the English I have learnt in school

Interesting – is that common practice in France?
 
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GrahamHill
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:23 pm

Quoting aero145 (Reply 3):
Interesting – is that common practice in France?

I would not be able to tell, to be honest. But I can try to dig up some information.
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dc9northwest
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:24 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):

If I'm writing a paper, I'll use American spelling, since I'm studying at an American University. Having said that, I sometimes like to use British spelling for the simple reasons that 1) IMO it reflects pronunciation better or 2) it looks better on paper.

From your list... It's definitely analyze, synthesize and organization.
I rarely use the word draft/draught, even though it is one of the most common enemies of the Romanian people, e.g. "don't open that window; there'll be a draught" on a 35 degree day in August on a train without air conditioning.
Ameba and esthetics look incorrect.
Car-related things... I really prefer the American spelling.
Travelling and other words like it (one or two ls)... I'll take the two l solution. It emphasizes the correct pronunciation IMO.

That said, it all comes down to preference.
 
sw733
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:35 pm

I grew up in Namibia to American parents, so in school we learned British English, and at home I spoke American English, so I have always been able to switch between the two based on who I am speaking with. That being said, with my having lived in America for 8 years now, my default is American English.
 
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sebolino
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:59 pm

Quoting aero145 (Reply 3):
Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 1):
I use (or try to use) the Oxford spelling, because it is the English I have learnt in school

Interesting – is that common practice in France?

No.
As far as I remember, it's the British English which is taught at school. It sounds pretty normal, we learn English not American.
 
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:21 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):
British* spelling (analyse, synthesise, organisation, draught, kerb, tyre, centred, amoeba, aesthetics, colour)

British English for me here as well, the suffixes are spelt as -ise not -ize. The only time I would use the American spelling is if I'm doing an essay in which I quoted an American publication, and I would notate that spelling with [sic], acknowledging that it's not how the word is generally spelt but it is a direct quotation of the reference.
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aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:32 pm

Quoting sw733 (Reply 6):
I grew up in Namibia to American parents, so in school we learned British English, and at home I spoke American English, so I have always been able to switch between the two based on who I am speaking with. That being said, with my having lived in America for 8 years now, my default is American English.

You can speak American English out of a text spelled the British way and vice-versa – so you can switch between both spellings without problems?

Quoting sebolino (Reply 7):
No.
As far as I remember, it's the British English which is taught at school.

That would make more sense at least.

Quoting sebolino (Reply 7):
It sounds pretty normal, we learn English not American.

I’m only talking about spelling, not pronuncation.

Quoting CXB77L (Reply 8):
The only time I would use the American spelling is if I'm doing an essay in which I quoted an American publication, and I would notate that spelling with [sic], acknowledging that it's not how the word is generally spelt but it is a direct quotation of the reference.

I think that’s the only correct way – just like when one quotes an old text in German, one must copy the old spelling, even if one writes with the new spelling:

“Konrad Adenauer sagte, dass „die Abflußanlagen in Erlangen erneuert werden müssen“” (in the new German spelling, the “ß” becomes “ss” if the vocal is short)
 
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casinterest
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:38 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):
ameba, esthetics

I don't think these are American. If so they are not used.
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sw733
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:23 pm

Quoting aero145 (Reply 9):
You can speak American English out of a text spelled the British way and vice-versa – so you can switch between both spellings without problems?

Yes, I have no issues switching between the two, including most (not all) slang. Between my upbringing and constant travel for my job, I have been lucky enough to use both types of English on an almost daily basis.

The slang is a bit different, as I grew up on mostly South African and American slang, so once in a while I can get some British and Australian slang wrong (but I can usually get it).

[Edited 2011-03-07 10:27:20]
 
aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:52 pm

Quoting casinterest (Reply 10):
I don't think these are American. If so they are not used.

I do know that they are American. It’s the same that applies to:

haemorrhage --> hemorrhage
diarrhoea --> diarrhea
..
thus
..
amoeba --> ameba
aesthetics --> esthetics

Unfortunately, I chose a bad example because amoeba and aesthetics are two words which are usually not simplified in American English, but the spellings are nevertheless valid – which means that you were right; “they are not used” —> seldom used.
 
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GrahamHill
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:18 pm

Quoting sebolino (Reply 7):
As far as I remember, it's the British English which is taught at school. It sounds pretty normal, we learn English not American.

Could it depend on some teachers? I remember using the "z" instead of the "s", but maybe my memory tricks me now
  
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aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:33 pm

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 13):
Could it depend on some teachers? I remember using the "z" instead of the "s", but maybe my memory tricks me now

Not having been in school in France, I’m 100% sure that some do. I remember teachers writing British spelling with -ize, -iza AND -yze.

Nevertheless, a combination of centre, realise, analyse and organisation respectively a combination of center, realize, analyze and organization are are usually said to be correct, but not a mix of them all.
 
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Aesma
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:45 pm

I had no idea about the differences until high school when I got an Australian teacher and he did a lesson about the variations. We were taught English as in the UK I would say, but I can't tell if it's official policy, I shall ask the mother of a friend, she's an English teacher (and from the UK).

Then, I vastly expanded my knowledge of the language on the net and watching US TV shows/movies (using English subtitles at first, or still, when I have trouble distinguishing the words, like during action scenes with lots of music/explosions), so I'm more familiar with US spelling, but it's not a conscious thing, so it can totally happen that I write the English word, especially if it's the same as in French (like theatre).

At the moment I'm watching an UK TV show (Torchwood) and well, there's a lot of vocabulary and slang I'm not familiar with !

I also started recently to read books in English, Sci-Fi to be more precise, as lot of the production is in that language. Authors are often Americans, so the trend should continue.

Also, I use an American English check speller on my browser.
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andrej
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 8:50 pm

Hello,

I prefer to use the US spelling as I pretty much grew up in the States (I went from a middle-school to a college there). To me it is simpler, easy to learn, and straight-forward (e.g. color vs. colour).

I guess Americans perfected the KISS method! 

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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:53 pm

Being half Irish and thus a fluent English speaker since I could talk, I used to speak English with a wonderful Kerry accent. However, when I was 10 my dad moved to Nashville, Tennessee. Spent 10 weeks there in the summer of 96 and my Kerry accent was gone, and was replaced with the Southern drawl spoken by my new step-siblings.

As that was around the same time that English lessons started in school, and I hadn't really written very much in English by then, I started out using British English spelling. Later in my teens I was exposed to more American literature and culture in general (including posts on this forum by the large number of Americans   ), and I noticed that my high school English teacher didn't have a problem with me using American English (I had been scolded by previous teachers for "not pronouncing words correctly", saying sidewalk instead of pavement, etc), I made the transition to using American spelling.

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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:47 am

Well I didn't grow up in SE Asia but in Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei they use English, not American English. In fact its very English in certain parts.

The only exception might be that they sometimes use soccer instead of football.
With football being so huge in SE Asia and Man Utd, Liverpool, Chelsea shirts seen on every street-corner I am surprised that out of all American words they went with that hehe

The main difference in English is really between American English and English. Canadian, Australian grammar isn't that different from English,. But American differs pretty substantially.
I never feel comfortable with American English and when we have Americans working for us, a European company, we quickly explain that in our company we use English and so must they if they are to work for us. Never been an issue most of it is pretty standard anyway.
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Quokka
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:13 am

Quoting MillwallSean (Reply 18):


I have never regarded "soccer" as an American word as I believe the term arose in England in the late1880s and is a contraction of the word Association, as in Association Football. The name was invented to distinguish the sport from other codes like rugby football.
 
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DocLightning
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:57 am

I've found that the version of English that someone learns is typically related to proximity to the nearest anglophone countries. Mexico and S. America learn American English. Europe learns British English.

Political affiliation also has something to do with it. Hong Kong and India, both former British colonies, use British English. Japan uses American English.
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Airstud
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:06 am

Quoting aero145 (Reply 12):
Unfortunately, I chose a bad example because amoeba and aesthetics are two words which are usually not simplified in American English, but the spellings are nevertheless valid – which means that you were right; “they are not used” —> seldom used.

  

I see "aesthetic" all the time in American English; I've almost never ever seen "esthetic."

However, some girls who work at beauty salons call themselves "estheticians." This is a word I don't see all that often though I'm not sure I've ever ever ever seen it spelled "aesthetician."

Also, verbs that end in "-vise" are not converted to "-vize" in American English. "Revise, advise, devise, improvise" do not contain z's (or zeds!   ) even over here.

The same is true of "advertise."
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Lufthansa411
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:13 am

I am a native (American) English speaker, although my spelling generally now is british, and my everyday speech is british except when I am talking with my parents. After working in a European office, it was just easier to switch than have people ask about the different vocab and whatnot, and the fact that one of my HS English teachers had us purchase grammar books imported from England. Some of the British slang I haven't totally picked up, but now that I am watching much more British shows on the telly   that is beginning to change.
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aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:13 am

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 20):
I've found that the version of English that someone learns is typically related to proximity to the nearest anglophone countries. Mexico and S. America learn American English. Europe learns British English.

Funnily, the school dictionaries in Germany usually contain the Oxford spelling -> in my opinion a good way to mix up already mixed up kids.  
Quoting Airstud (Reply 21):
However, some girls who work at beauty salons call themselves "estheticians." This is a word I don't see all that often though I'm not sure I've ever ever ever seen it spelled "aesthetician."

“Aestheticians” sounds cool to me – people who “work on the aesthetics” of people.  
 
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BNE
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:49 am

Maybe this might be unusual for everyone else but doesn't it depend on which way you set up the spell checker on the computer like Microsoft word or Microsoft outlook for emails.

The default for all the computers I get seem to default to American English, so I usually go with the American English so when I type up a document I use the American spelling that way the text doesn't look wrong when you save a copy.  
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aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:51 am

Quoting BNE (Reply 24):
The default for all the computers I get seem to default to American English, so I usually go with the American English so when I type up a document I use the American spelling that way the text doesn't look wrong when you save a copy.

So the only reason you write .. analyze, realize, center, etc. .. is so that you don’t get the ugly underlines when you write it “the Australian way”?  
 
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 12:12 pm

Here in Norway people tend to mix up spelling, I proof read a lot of the brochures my company prints, Norwegians tend to mix American and English spelling, very frustrating having to correct everything, then when something new is added and they don't check it with me we end up with mixed spelling in the printed work.

My pet peeve is when a website displays a US flag to signify the English version of the web-page, the language is English not American. You don't see Spanish with an Argentine flag, French with a Belgium flag, Portuguese with a Brazilian flag, so why English with an American flag? Are people really that ignorant?

For some reason which I can't fathom in NZ we spell fjord, fiord, everyone else spells it with a "J" we use an "I".
 
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 1:41 pm

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 26):
My pet peeve is when a website displays a US flag to signify the English version of the web-page, the language is English not American.

Or vice versa. In my company we're always struggling with using AE or BE. f.ex 'he went to hospital (BE) or he went to the hospital'
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ajd1992
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 3:14 pm

Just an FYI for those who don't know - In the EU, at least as far as I'm aware, they do teach British English, as do Canada as well, although theirs is more "Americanised" (or is that -ized?  ).

I use UK English. It pisses me off when Americans on forums correct me, trying to be a smartarse. I refuse to spell things the US way even when I'm in the US, so I'll be damned if I'm doing it in my own country.
 
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:24 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 20):
I've found that the version of English that someone learns is typically related to proximity to the nearest anglophone countries. Mexico and S. America learn American English. Europe learns British English

Depends on what/where you're talking about. In Chile for example, my experience was that while your statement may be generally true for High School, in college British English was taught (to include pronunciation)..........this was true at least in the 70s and 80s   .
 
comorin
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:48 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 20):
I've found that the version of English that someone learns is typically related to proximity to the nearest anglophone countries. Mexico and S. America learn American English. Europe learns British English.

Political affiliation also has something to do with it. Hong Kong and India, both former British colonies, use British English. Japan uses American English.

What also matters is the high school exam you study for. A large part of the Commonwealth used the Cambridge GCE (now GCSE) which prescribes a fairly detailed English curriculum. Since then, local Secondary School Certificates have pretty much stuck to that flavor. Much of western style education in Asia was also spread by similarly educated Jesuits.

In Israel, you can listen to the old timers speak perfectly clipped English, while the newer generation sound US (Williamsburg?).
 
aero145
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:34 pm

Quoting ajd1992 (Reply 28):
Just an FYI for those who don't know - In the EU, at least as far as I'm aware, they do teach British English

Allegedly. Unfortunately, it’s amazingly mixed up... at least in Germany. “I had to analyze the formation of the water droplets in the vapour.” This would be the Canadian spelling.

Quoting ajd1992 (Reply 28):
I use UK English. It pisses me off when Americans on forums correct me, trying to be a smartarse.

Well this forum is American, right?   
 
ME AVN FAN
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:03 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):
Non-native English speakers, which spelling to you use/prefer and why?

I in general use the British spelling, except when I know that the other side is US-American. So, correspondence to Britain today was done on 9th March 2011, while correspondence to the USA was done on March 9, 2011
  and things in the USA are colorful but in Britain colourful

It just means to adapt. I mean, if a pedestrian in Germany is not on the motor car lane he is on the "Gehsteig" but the same person here in Zürich is on the "Trottoir", while he alternatively in Germany may use the "Fahrrad" while the same person in Zurich will use the "Velo"  
 
exFATboy
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:26 pm

Quoting aero145 (Thread starter):
also used in former British colonies with the exception of Canada

From what I've seen, Canadians - particularly Canadian media and government - are more likely to use "British" spellings than American, and British grammar is common too..."go to hospital" rather than the American "go to the hospital", for example.

If anything, the trend is toward British spelling - back in the early days of the Internet, I noticed the Toronto Star varied in spelling use from article to article, but has since standardized on British spelling.

In the West, American spelling is more common, but when I visited BC and Calgary, British spelling seemed to be prevalent.

Quoting BNE (Reply 24):
The default for all the computers I get seem to default to American English

Heh, this used to be a problem for me - in an example of the epic incoherence of my old employer's IT department, for several years the default spelling for Microsoft Office in our London office was American, but in the New York office was British. Eventually it got reversed for a few years, then standardized globally using British spelling, then "regionalized" again.

We also tended to use a lot of "British" vocabulary company-wide (it was a German company) - "mobile" instead of "cell phone", "holiday" instead of "vacation", etc. Americans at the firm calling each other commonly said "cheers" to each other at the end of phone calls.

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 26):
My pet peeve is when a website displays a US flag to signify the English version of the web-page, the language is English not American.

Then technically, the sites should use St. George's Cross, not the Union Flag. But I see your point, at least for non-American websites.

As a compromise, I've seen many websites use a half-Union Flag/half-US flag symbol.
 
AR385
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:25 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 20):
Mexico and S. America learn American English. Europe learns British English.

That is a very generalized statement. Some private schools in Mexico, will teach American English, others will teach British English. "The American School", will not teach British english, neither will the "Oxford Institute" teach American English.

However, some schools will teach the English the current professor in charge of the class hails from, which was my case. So, basically, I learned English from British teachers and American teachers and even a Dutch one. Until in high school I changed to "The American School Foundation of Monterrey" and things evened out. Although my physics professor was from Leeds and my Chemistry professor from Alberta. I remember once writing "aeroplane" and my American English teacher correcting me and saying it was an "arcane" word.

Then in grad school my best friend was an Australian so you can imagine the different spellings I´ve been subjected to.

In Argentina, as a rule, any English taught is British.

So the way I write now, is mostly American, but once in a while I will slip a British spelling or use British slang. Even Australian. I guess that is a good thing, and represents diversity and openness.
 
fraspotter
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 12:59 am

Learning a different form of English can also lead to some very embarrassing situations... In High School I had a good friend who grew up going to primary school in England so she grew up learning English. One day she went up to the teacher in my class and asked to borrow a "rubber". Obviously she meant an "eraser" but the teacher was surprised as hell and almost fell out of her chair laughing... Needless to say my friend was embarrassed but laughed as well when she was told what "rubber" was slang for in the US...  
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speedygonzales
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:25 am

I guess it's a mix, but in some cases I prefer the american when it's closer to pronounciation, e.g. color, analog, center.
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BAViscount
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:58 am

Quoting FRAspotter (Reply 35):
One day she went up to the teacher in my class and asked to borrow a "rubber".

Reminds me of when one of my cousins from North Carolina spent six months living and working in London. She had a temporary job working in a large chain store, where she caused embarrassment one day by asking her boss if he minded if she wore "pants" to work! He didn't quite know what to say! 
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AR385
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 8:24 am

One can´t forget there are many types of American. Trying to talk to someone from the North East is an entirely different experience than trying to talk to someone from deep Texas. Or, when I lived in Central Virginia, the Appalachia people that delivered my wood for the winter, they were unintelligible, of course, the moonshine never helped either.

I have never been able to understand an African American from the South too, I always have to ask them to repeat themselves.

I believe there is not only American and/or British. The variety is endless.
 
N1120A
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:12 am

I make fun of my girlfriend's spelling all the time. She adds all the weird u's and spells center as centre because she is Canadian.


Quoting aero145 (Reply 12):
amoeba --> ameba
aesthetics --> esthetics

Unfortunately, I chose a bad example because amoeba and aesthetics are two words which are usually not simplified in American English,

Exactly. That is a really poor example. I've never seen those spelled that way.

Quoting GrahamHill (Reply 13):

Could it depend on some teachers? I remember using the "z" instead of the "s", but maybe my memory tricks me now

The s and z use is largely optional, even on this side of the pond. I use the s on some words that most Americans use a z on, mostly because I feel it fits better.

Quoting Airstud (Reply 21):

I see "aesthetic" all the time in American English; I've almost never ever seen "esthetic."

I've never seen esthetic or Ameba.

Quoting ME AVN FAN (Reply 32):

It just means to adapt. I mean, if a pedestrian in Germany is not on the motor car lane he is on the "Gehsteig" but the same person here in Zürich is on the "Trottoir", while he alternatively in Germany may use the "Fahrrad" while the same person in Zurich will use the "Velo"

At least Americans and Brits can understand each other (generally). Germans (and those of us who speak German) have no clue what the Swiss are saying  
Quoting AR385 (Reply 38):
One can´t forget there are many types of American. Trying to talk to someone from the North East is an entirely different experience than trying to talk to someone from deep Texas. Or, when I lived in Central Virginia, the Appalachia people that delivered my wood for the winter, they were unintelligible, of course, the moonshine never helped either.

That is a spoken difference, but not really a spelling difference.
Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
 
Aeri28
Posts: 670
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 1:08 pm

RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:57 am

Aluminum. There I said it.

One of the WORST complaints I hear Brits complain about is the American spelling and pronunciation of Aluminum. Now we simply pronounce it how it is spelled. But many Brits cannot seem to grasp that and insist that it should be Aluminiumum or something to that effect.

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 26):
My pet peeve is when a website displays a US flag to signify the English version of the web-page, the language is English not American. You don't see Spanish with an Argentine flag, French with a Belgium flag, Portuguese with a Brazilian flag, so why English with an American flag? Are people really that ignorant?

See I feel the opposite. I get a bit peeved when I do not see an American flag when I am looking for an English translation. The UK is not my country but English as a language is: American English lol. I do see the US flag moreso, especially on travel sites. Maybe it's a nod to population or influence or to attract those from said country. Who knows. But ignorant? Nahhh. I'm sure people can decipher either a Union Jack of American Flag and figure it out. Perhaps America has taken the English language moniker to mean American English. Most of us in this country are not aware there is anything else lol. (and on this particular subject Im not sure it really matters that we do). I do try to appease the British readership on a few UK based forums by spelling words as a nod to both American and British English spellings by spelling such words on posts as: analyz(s)e, criticiz(s)e and so on. It makes me feel better.


Quoting exFATboy (Reply 33):
As a compromise, I've seen many websites use a half-Union Flag/half-US flag symbol.

I see that too. I think some sites do that to appease both sides as clearly it 'can' make a difference to some. I believe that is the case.
 
CXB77L
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:09 pm

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 26):
My pet peeve is when a website displays a US flag to signify the English version of the web-page, the language is English not American. You don't see Spanish with an Argentine flag, French with a Belgium flag, Portuguese with a Brazilian flag, so why English with an American flag? Are people really that ignorant?

  

I agree entirely.

Quoting exFATboy (Reply 33):
As a compromise, I've seen many websites use a half-Union Flag/half-US flag symbol.

Perhaps there should be a British English version of the site as well as an American English version. I think the two languages are getting quite separate to the point where I believe in the future, they will be completely different.

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 40):
Aluminum. There I said it.

One of the WORST complaints I hear Brits complain about is the American spelling and pronunciation of Aluminum. Now we simply pronounce it how it is spelled. But many Brits cannot seem to grasp that and insist that it should be Aluminiumum or something to that effect.

Aluminium. It's spelt as such, and pronounced as Al-u-min-i-um.
Boeing 777 fanboy
 
Quokka
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:11 pm

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 40):
Aluminum. There I said it.

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990 (although it lists both) and the International Aluminium Institute, which includes all the world's leading producers, has the British spelling in its official name. However, to each his own.  

Licence and License - In Britain (and Australia) licence is a noun and the verb is license. Examples of usage: "He applied for a driving licence and is licensed to drive."
In the US both the noun and the verb are written with the same spelling - license.
 
HT
Posts: 5857
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Fri Mar 11, 2011 4:52 pm

In Business eMails, I usually adapt the style to what is being common and/or preferred in that country.
In case of no such preference, the US-style dominates in my business life.
-HT
Carpe diem ! Life is too short to waste your time ! Keep in mind, that today is the first day of the rest of your life !
 
ME AVN FAN
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:49 am

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 40):
Aluminum

-
it simply is the "I" as the Brits write it correctly "Aluminium"

Quoting N1120A (Reply 39):
Germans (and those of us who speak German) have no clue what the Swiss are saying

Germans upnorth to the Taunus (the mountain-range north of Frankfurt and Wiesbaden and south of Köln/Cologne) plus the Saxons understand most Swiss-German dialects (except someones people in Zurich and Basel also do not understand). For North-of-the-Taunus Germans it may be more difficult, but such ones having strong local dialects like Kölsch, Platt, Berlinerisch, hardly have too many problems. Do not forget that the dialects of Stuttgart and Southern Baden-Württemberg are closer to Swiss German than to Standard German, and full Bavarian is on a scale of its own.

You refer to spelling/writing. This in reality is the same from the San Gottardo up to Flensberg in more than 95% of all cases. So that EVERY German can read Swiss newspapers and Bavarian newspapers quite easily.
 
aero145
Topic Author
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RE: Non-native English Speakers: Which Spelling?

Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:43 am

Quoting exFATboy (Reply 33):
From what I've seen, Canadians - particularly Canadian media and government - are more likely to use "British" spellings than American, and British grammar is common too..."go to hospital" rather than the American "go to the hospital", for example.

The Australian and British spellings (especially the -isa, -ise, -yse) are more similar than the Canadian and British, that’s why I said that Canada was the exception. Otherwise, you’re right of course.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 34):
neither will the "Oxford Institute" teach American English.

It will probably teach “Oxford English”, no? (analyse–realize vs. analyse–realise)  
Quoting AR385 (Reply 38):
I believe there is not only American and/or British. The variety is endless.

That’s a theme for another thread.   This is only about the spelling, not the pronunciation.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 39):
I've never seen esthetic or Ameba.

I have seen these spellings and I doubt you can deny that they’re wrong – I did say that I had chosen a bad example but they’re still valid (you could look it up) and show the usual removal of O or A from words (better example, with the ligatures: archælogy –> archelogy, diarrhœa –> diarrhea).

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