User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:42 am

Inspired by comorin post on the Vada Pav.....Its high time we folks discussed the best foods out there.

Too bad Im working on those abs so I restrict myself from eating some of the fantastic foods around in Mumbai.But I enjoy talking about them.

To start the famous chicken tikka, seekh kabab, masala dosa, vada pav, pav bhaji, chicken bhuna rice, Chicken Biryani......add to it the drinks like Falooda,chaas & laasi.....




Great place to be in Mumbai ......Fantastic Music....FantasticFood........
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
lszb
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:08 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:41 pm

Last weekend i cooked an awesome meal....one course was lobster...it was simply delicious!

 
User avatar
falstaff
Posts: 5577
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 6:17 am

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 2:01 pm

Quoting lszb (Reply 1):
one course was lobster...it was simply delicious!

That is one of my all time favorite meals. Crab is a close second.
My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:07 pm

I wish I hadn't opened this thread - I am soooo hungry now!  


I love to eat and drink but slowly drifting to vegetarianism with age...

In NYC, because of the population density (like Mumbai) we are able to get a lot of tasty food without spending a fortune. You can get really good Indian foods at lunchtime buffets (about $10). Roadside foods include trucks that serve some pretty fancy food.

NY is also famous for its delis. where you can get heart-attack sized sandwiches - corned beef, pastrami and of course a grilled Rueben. My personal favorite is the Carnegie Deli.





 
desertjets
Posts: 7575
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2000 3:12 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:19 pm

Now I really want Indian food. And a corned beef sandwich.

Seriously that chicken looks soooo good. But today is a cool, cloudy day and I am craving some green chile stew -- made with New Mexico grown green chile.
Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:31 pm

Today I had a Chicken Tikka + Tandoori roti accompanied by some fantastic chaas.....Being a Public holiday out here on Thursday.....Made the occassion all the more Enjoyable......
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:43 pm

Quoting desertjets (Reply 4):
I am craving some green chile stew

I love that too! There was a restaurant in Greenwich Village called the Manhattan Chili Co that had the best food.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 5):
by some fantastic chaas.

What exactly is Chaas?
 
BAViscount
Posts: 1975
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 8:01 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:15 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 3):
You can get really good Indian foods at lunchtime buffets (about $10).

I don't mean to be contentious, but I've found that any Indian food I've ever eaten in the US has been bland and uninteresting and totally unrepresentative of how good Indian food can be. Maybe I've not eaten at the right places, but I've eaten at various Indian restaurants in Boston and NYC, and don't get me started on the Indian buffet that my cousin took me to in Winston-Salem, NC! She thought it was amazing, but looked at me in horror when I had to drown the food in salt in an attempt to get some flavour from it!

There was also the time when my aunt, uncle and another cousin were visiting us from North Carolina and we took them to a local Indian restaurant. My cousin insisted on ordering a Vindaloo - despite our warnings she said that it was fine as she ate it all the time at home. She ate one mouthful, started sweating, went bright red and decided that she should have listened to our advice!

On the flip side of that, I've eaten at some amazing Mexican restaurants in the US, but have yet to have a decent Mexican meal in the UK!

At the moment I'm living near Slough in Berkshire, a town that has quite a large Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi population. I recently discovered what I can only describe as a "food van" under a flyover behind the main shopping street that does the most amazing South Indian food! I ordered a set meal that involved a couple of Idlis, followed by a Masala Dosa...it was the biggest and tastiest Masala Dosa I've ever had and was at least 18 inches across! All washed down with a freshly-made mango lassi (well, as fresh as it can be in a country where mangoes don't usually grow), it was perfect.
Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
 
pnqiad
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 5:05 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:25 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 6):
What exactly is Chaas?

Indian buttermilk. Yogurt is churned to remove the butter and what remains is chaas. Add some salt to taste and a cool refreshing drink is ready. Sometimes flavored with ginger/green chili or with black salt or a thousand other ways.
 
sea2sky
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2011 10:23 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:27 am

SEAFOOD! Seafood is never given enough credit!! So many types, styles, and tastes! Plus it gives me another reason to eat butter and garlic  


There is a dish I had in Croatia, they use the squids ink... I think that is my number one!! But all food is delicious!

k
 
777way
Posts: 6470
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:38 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:35 am

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):
I don't mean to be contentious, but I've found that any Indian food I've ever eaten in the US has been bland and uninteresting and totally unrepresentative of how good Indian food can be. Maybe I've not eaten at the right places, but I've eaten at various Indian restaurants in Boston and NYC, and don't get me started on the Indian buffet that my cousin took me to in Winston-Salem, NC! She thought it was amazing, but looked at me in horror when I had to drown the food in salt in an attempt to get some flavour from it!

Thats been my expeience as well with South Indian cuisine in Dubai, very disappointing, I expected spicy, tangy stuff but it turned out bland, under salted and with a sweetish tinge, and we used to eat at cafe's catering to low income groups so the food should have been tastier but it wasnt.

Hyderabadi stuff is really tasty.

Quoting comorin (Reply 6):

What exactly is Chaas?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaas
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 1:28 am

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):
I don't mean to be contentious, but I've found that any Indian food I've ever eaten in the US has been bland and uninteresting and totally unrepresentative of how good Indian food can be.

If you ever head to NYC again let me know I'll give you the lowdown!

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):
I ordered a set meal that involved a couple of Idlis, followed by a Masala Dosa...it was the biggest and tastiest Masala Dosa I've ever had

Yum! Hope you had the coconut chutney as accompaniment. You HAVE to wash it down with Madras Coffee for the perfect aftertaste.

btw Mango Lassi is made from canned Alfonso Mango pulp which tastes great and works better than using fresh mangoes.

Quoting pnqiad (Reply 8):

Thanks.

Quoting 777way (Reply 10):
Thats been my expeience as well with South Indian cuisine in Dubai, very disappointing, I expected spicy, tangy stuff but it turned out bland, under salted and with a sweetish tinge, and we used to eat at cafe's catering to low income groups so the food should have been tastier but it wasnt.

Hyderabadi stuff is really tasty.

You have two very different cuisines going on there. There is the Hyderabi Nawabi cuisine (Biryani), Udipi Vegetarian cuisine (Idlis, Dosas), Chettinad Non-Veg cuisine from around Chennai, and Malayali Coconut based stuff (Avial, Molee etc). They are all delicious.

When I move to Dubai I will ferret out the best places from the cabbies. There MUST be some great spots there!
 
BAViscount
Posts: 1975
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 8:01 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 1:42 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 11):
If you ever head to NYC again let me know I'll give you the lowdown!

Oh I will!

Quoting comorin (Reply 11):
Yum! Hope you had the coconut chutney as accompaniment. You HAVE to wash it down with Madras Coffee for the perfect aftertaste.

Coconut chutney, sambar, the whole nine yards! Unfortunately they didn't offer Madras Coffee, so I had to make do with the mango lassi.

I know of a restaurant in South London that sells a six foot family-sized Masala Dosa (how they cook it I have no idea...must have a huge kitchen!). I've often thought about starving for a week or so and going there for a treat, but I don't think I could cope with the strange looks I'd probably get!! 
Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 8:20 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 6):

What exactly is Chaas?



Another good dish is the Pani puri. very light snack.

Out here there is an Annual contest for the best Panipuri/Pav Bhaji/Vada Pav in Mumbai.......Great occassion.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
rabenschlag
Posts: 1012
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2000 10:28 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:34 pm

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):
I don't mean to be contentious, but I've found that any Indian food I've ever eaten in the US has been bland and uninteresting and totally unrepresentative of how good Indian food can be. Maybe I've not eaten at the right places, but I've eaten at various Indian restaurants in Boston and NYC, and don't get me started on the Indian buffet that my cousin took me to in Winston-Salem, NC! She thought it was amazing, but looked at me in horror when I had to drown the food in salt in an attempt to get some flavour from it!

I always had the impression that Americans generally use way less salt than other groups of people. Maybe that reflects greater concerns for health. So, during my first weeks living in the US, I generally felt that the food was a bit bland (but often hotter and more garlic-laden than in Europe). Additionally, while living in the US, I felt that produce and meat often were less flavorful than in Europe - for whatever reason.
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 1:57 pm

Quoting Rabenschlag (Reply 14):
I always had the impression that Americans generally use way less salt than other groups of people. Maybe that reflects greater concerns for health. So, during my first weeks living in the US, I generally felt that the food was a bit bland (but often hotter and more garlic-laden than in Europe). Additionally, while living in the US, I felt that produce and meat often were less flavorful than in Europe - for whatever reason.

  

American meals are less salted, but there's tons of salt in snacks which are consumed all day  

You are right about garlic too, I think it comes from the Italian side of the immigrant history - just a guess.

As for less flavorful, it's changing. As a land of immigrants, there is a short memory of taste - accelerated by fast foods and packaging convenience from the 50's. All that is changing now, as local sourcing and freshness are in the forefront of a culinary revolution. Presently, however, Europeans still have the tastiest bread, eggs, juices and so on. On the other hands, arguably, nothing like a American steak or Maine lobster!
 
MD-90
Posts: 7835
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2000 12:45 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 2:59 pm

Quoting Rabenschlag (Reply 14):
Additionally, while living in the US, I felt that produce and meat often were less flavorful than in Europe - for whatever reason.

I agree. Our cows/chickens/etc are fed far too much corn and soy (instead of being properly pastured) and our fruits and vegetables in grocery stores tend to be industrially farmed to stay fresh longer at the expense of quality. Americans in general have a tendency to accept crappy quality food because it's more difficult (and more expensive) here to get good quality food from famers markets, direct from farmers themselves, and from boutique places like Whole Foods.

We do have very good seafood, though.
 
rabenschlag
Posts: 1012
Joined: Fri Oct 20, 2000 10:28 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:04 pm

Quoting comorin (Reply 15):
On the other hands, arguably, nothing like a American steak or Maine lobster!
Quoting MD-90 (Reply 16):
We do have very good seafood, though.

Indeed! You may also add anything that comes from a BBQ smoker. This delicious form of cooking is mostly unknown in my country, and I miss it so much. Pulled pork sandwiches, babyback ribs - yum!
 
JJJ
Posts: 2249
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 5:12 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:38 pm

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 16):
We do have very good seafood, though.

And bacon, no country does bacon like the US 
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:42 pm

Quoting JJJ (Reply 18):
And bacon, no country does bacon like the US

I prefer the bacon rashers you get in the UK, but if you like your Bacon crispy then the US is the place.
 
BAViscount
Posts: 1975
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 8:01 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:51 pm

Quoting comorin (Reply 19):
I prefer the bacon rashers you get in the UK, but if you like your Bacon crispy then the US is the place.

Ahhhhh...you can't beat a few crispy bacon rashers (UK style) between two slices of fresh crusty bread with lashings of ketchup! The good old British 'Bacon Butty'! 
Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:37 pm

By the way, things are getting nutty in the US too with the food police. Order roast chicken for dinner? You have to check if it is locally sourced, how it is fed, exercise details and if it was humanely treated. By this time, you might as well ask for the bird's name and if it came from a happy family.
 
baguy
Posts: 474
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:04 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 10:19 pm

Pastéis de nata are the most heavenly things on the planet. One of those and a galão and I'm set up for the day!  

BAguy
 
BAViscount
Posts: 1975
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2004 8:01 am

RE: The Food Thread

Fri Oct 07, 2011 11:39 pm

Quoting comorin (Reply 21):
You have to check if it is locally sourced, how it is fed, exercise details and if it was humanely treated. By this time, you might as well ask for the bird's name and if it came from a happy family.

Same here! Last year I went into a country pub with a good friend of mine and, as usual, she took ages to decide what she wanted to order from the lunch menu. Eventually she decided to order the pork sausages, but proceeded to ask the barmaid the provenance of the pigs that went to make those sausages before she would confirm her order. Of course the barmaid had no idea, but "pretended" to go ask the chef...who probably had no idea either, but eventually she ordered the sausages.

She later asked me if she had gone too far. "Errrr...yeah!" was my honest response!
Ladies & gentlemen this is Captain Tobias Wilcock welcoming you aboard Coconut Airways flight 372 to Bridgetown Barb
 
MD-90
Posts: 7835
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2000 12:45 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:12 am

Quoting Rabenschlag (Reply 17):
Indeed! You may also add anything that comes from a BBQ smoker. This delicious form of cooking is mostly unknown in my country, and I miss it so much. Pulled pork sandwiches, babyback ribs - yum!

I've lived in Alabama and Mississippi for most of my life and I know the excellence of which you speak.
 
RGElectra80
Posts: 423
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 5:40 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:04 am

I could go for some chicken wings right now. I've actually been wanting good wings for a couple of weeks. Not the Pizza Hut type wings, but good wings. The ones that don't taste like poultry.

If you're looking for a good chicken recipe, try this. I'd recommend serving it with some risotto or rice:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/g...an-style-chicken-recipe/index.html
austinspotter.wordpress.com
 
User avatar
WarRI1
Posts: 8716
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 10:51 am

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:39 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 19):
I prefer the bacon rashers you get in the UK, but if you like your Bacon crispy then the US is the place.

I have never forgotten the Bacon in London, I ate a bacon sandwich every morning while I was there. It was a small place off Trafalger Square.
It is better to die on your feet, than live on your knees.
 
ScarletHarlot
Posts: 4251
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 12:15 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 4:11 am

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):
I don't mean to be contentious, but I've found that any Indian food I've ever eaten in the US has been bland and uninteresting and totally unrepresentative of how good Indian food can be.

I am not that experienced with Indian food, but the best I have ever had was in Wokingham at the Tamarind Tree. So much better than anything I have had in the States.

Best foods out there...like BAGuy, I am partial to Portuguese food. I loves me some pasteis de bacalhau. Throw in some vinho verde and I am a very happy Harlot.
But that was when I ruled the world
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 9:02 am



Then theres always the south Indian variety that gets prepared almost in a jiffy & served real quick.
Namely....The Masala dosa,idli,Meduvada & the Uttapa.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:25 pm

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 28):

Great pics! Out here many people assume all Indian food is Mughlai and have not cultivated a taste for South Indian food. I think I will retire in India next to an Udipi restaurant...  
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sat Oct 08, 2011 6:16 pm

I always believe food & music are the excellent points of India.
There are so many varieties.
Most excellent to taste.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
kiwiinoz
Posts: 1999
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:07 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 2:02 am

Indian food is up near the top of my list. I travel for work a lot and am usually looked after well by the locals. They know me well enough to avoid fancy restaurants. More often we hit the streets looking for a few fresh prepared delicacies.

Singaporean seafood is also up there for me. Also the Cantonese style steamed whole fish.
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 5:28 am



The Good old home cooked Batata Bhaji
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
Springbok747
Posts: 4007
Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2004 9:13 am

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 8:34 am

Ahh..HAWK..stop posting those yummy pictures..I'm sitting here craving Indian food (most of the Indian restaurants here are crap..I'll need to drive to Melbourne to get some decent Indian food now..)      

Quoting comorin (Reply 11):
If you ever head to NYC again let me know I'll give you the lowdown!

Last time I was in NYC we went to this place called Bombay something..can't remember..can't remember which street it was in either (it was pretty close to MOMA).but all I know is they had a big fish tank with an eel in it. And the food was awesome! Best chicken tikka I've had in a long time!
אני תומך בישראל
 
Kiwirob
Posts: 10018
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 2:16 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 10:41 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 15):
nothing like a American steak

Unless you've eaten Argentinian, Brazilian or Kazakhstani beef, then you'd realise American steak is just average, no better than what you'd get in Europe or Australia/NZ.

I was in Kazakhstan last week, they do the most amazing steaks I've ever had, not just beef but horse as well, horse steak is amazing, very very tender with a richer flavor then beef, I wish I ould get it in Norway.
 
kiwiinoz
Posts: 1999
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2005 3:07 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:51 am

Agree. Haven't tried Kazak but in my experience it is Argentinian all the way. Meat quality and also the quality of cooking expertise
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 12:51 pm

Quoting Springbok747 (Reply 33):
Last time I was in NYC we went to this place called Bombay something

That was Bombay Palace...a good choice!

Quoting Springbok747 (Reply 33):
Ahh..HAWK..stop posting those yummy pictures.

Too late. The genie is out of the bottle! The secret word was 'Vada Pav'.

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 34):
Unless you've eaten Argentinian, Brazilian or Kazakhstani beef, then you'd realise American steak is just average, no better than what you'd get in Europe or Australia/NZ.
Quoting kiwiinoz (Reply 35):
Agree. Haven't tried Kazak but in my experience it is Argentinian all the way. Meat quality and also the quality of cooking expertise

Horses for courses   I have had Brazilian Steak (in Sao Paulo) and Australian Grass Fed Steak in NYC at a place across the street called Hacienda de Argentina. Excellent indeed, but I have yet to taste anything like the aged NY Porterhouse at Luger's or the like-butter Filet at Sparks.
 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 6:32 pm

Quoting comorin (Reply 36):

Quoting Springbok747 (Reply 33):
Ahh..HAWK..stop posting those yummy pictures.

Too late. The genie is out of the bottle! The secret word was 'Vada Pav'.

The Genie sure is out .......The Bombardment continues.......The Aim is to get most readers to the nearest Indian restraunt in town.  
Chicken Seekh kabab


Shami Kabab


Wash it down with a Rasmalai.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
luckyone
Posts: 2302
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 1:50 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 6:52 pm

I will never be able to enjoy steak again after a visit to Buenos Aires! Unless of course I return, but hey, I paid my US$140 for that ten year entry visa, I damned well better go back.

In Armenia they are incredibly proud of a dish called khinkali. And with good reason! During my month there we made a point to eat khinkali at least once a week! Add some Kilikia or Kotayk beer and a plate of basturma (sleep alone!), and I am in heaven!!! If you like the taste of Alka Selzer you can try this drink called "Tahn" which is basically a fermented yoghurt drink. Not my favorite! But finish the whole meal with a glass (or five) of pomegranate wine. Highly recommended.


 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13916
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:25 am

RE: The Food Thread

Sun Oct 09, 2011 7:13 pm

Quoting pnqiad (Reply 8):
Indian buttermilk. Yogurt is churned to remove the butter and what remains is chaas. Add some salt to taste and a cool refreshing drink is ready

Sounds like Turkish Ayran. Very refreshing.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
Avianca
Posts: 5274
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 5:33 am

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 1:10 am

Quoting luckyone (Reply 38):
I will never be able to enjoy steak again after a visit to Buenos Aires

well you would also enjoy steak in Montevideo..., also Brazilian and Paraguyan is great, or from Colombia...

Generally the best beef around the world is from SouthAmerica!
Colombia es el Mundo Y el Mundo es Colombia
 
JJJ
Posts: 2249
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 5:12 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:03 am

Quoting comorin (Reply 19):
I prefer the bacon rashers you get in the UK, but if you like your Bacon crispy then the US is the place.

I love the British thing, but that's not bacon to me, but loin.

My fav pork loin product are lomo embuchado, either fresh or cured.

 
User avatar
HAWK21M
Topic Author
Posts: 29867
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2001 10:05 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:42 am


The lightest snack ever......The Pani puri.
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
777way
Posts: 6470
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:38 am

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 9:30 am

I thought in India its called Gol Guppay no? BTW does Jeera Jal taste like pani puri water?
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 1:13 pm

Quoting 777way (Reply 43):
I thought in India its called Gol Guppay no? BTW does Jeera Jal taste like pani puri water?

you are right - In Delhi it would be called Gol Guppa and in Bombay it would be Pani Puri.
 
Kiwirob
Posts: 10018
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 2:16 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 1:59 pm

Quoting JJJ (Reply 18):
And bacon, no country does bacon like the US

Ever been to Denmark, they do some pretty impressive things with bacon.
 
Fly2HMO
Posts: 7207
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2004 12:14 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 2:57 pm

Quoting BAViscount (Reply 7):

On the flip side of that, I've eaten at some amazing Mexican restaurants in the US

May as well go to Mexico then because I think much worse things of "Mexican" restaurants in the US than what you think of Indian ones.   

Suffice to say I've easily been to close to 100 different "Mexican" joints all over the US, on both coasts, from mom and pop shops to fancy places, and always end up severely disappointed. I mean seriously, how the hell do you screw up a taco?!?!

Anyways, I long for the glorious foods I used to have access to during my years south of the border:

Well I'll be damned, I can't even find pictures of legit sonoran carne asada tacos in google!!   

Anyways, here's an approximation, real ones have flour tortillas not corn (blasphemy!)



Notice the simplicity, just properly grilled meat. That's it. Add your salsa bandera that should be on the side and you're good to go.

My other favorite, this time from central Mexico, is tacos al pastor, which are cooked in a huge vertical pit, not unlike greek gyro meat.



The finished product is this:

AL-PASTOR.jpg" width="336" height="400" border="0"/>

Proper iterations of these delicacies, and many other mexican ones, are not to be found north of the border, lest I make my own, which I can't since my apartment complex does not allow grills  
 
comorin
Posts: 3857
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 5:52 am

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:18 pm

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 46):

Mexican food was a fore runner of Indian food. Thanks to Columbus and the Conquistadors, India landed up with chilies, tomatoes, potatoes and so on.

India gave the World pepper, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, cloves and other spices, but the fiery stuff came from our friends in the West.

On a lighter note, there is a Mexican food cart near Bloomingdales NYC called "El Reyes del Sabor" and he claims his tacos are the real thing.



 
JJJ
Posts: 2249
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 5:12 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:49 pm

Quoting KiwiRob (Reply 45):
Ever been to Denmark, they do some pretty impressive things with bacon.

Scandinavia is one of the few remaining dark spots in my world travel map.

Care to share a few Danish bacon delicacies? 
 
RGElectra80
Posts: 423
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 5:40 pm

RE: The Food Thread

Mon Oct 10, 2011 5:19 pm

Quoting Fly2HMO (Reply 46):

Suffice to say I've easily been to close to 100 different "Mexican" joints all over the US, on both coasts, from mom and pop shops to fancy places, and always end up severely disappointed. I mean seriously, how the hell do you screw up a taco?!?!

Is it "Mexican" because they're Tex-Mex or Cal-Mex? There's a difference there that I hope you're recognizing.

Quoting JJJ (Reply 48):

Scandinavia is one of the few remaining dark spots in my world travel map.

I remember going to a Scandinavian Fair one time with my parents and having these wonderful open-faced sandwiches, one had some bacon with some kind of mayo and sprinkled crispy onions on top. The lax and dill on dark bread was also tasty.

Brazilian churrasco, anyone? It's a time-honored tradition to fire up some charcoals (never a gas grill in sight there), slap some meats on skewers and waste away an afternoon drinking beer and enjoying a variety of cuts coming off the grill. The churrascarias here, Texas de Brazil and Fogo de Chao mostly, are OK but vastly overpriced and you get very little variety, usually 10-12 cuts of meat. Go to one of those in Brazil and look forward to feasting on at least 20-25 different cuts, including my all-time favorite, chicken hearts.

I don't remember the name of the dish or the place, but when I was in Delhi a few years back, the locals we were with took us to this place that from all accounts was a sort of Indian barbecue joint. It was tucked away in a marketplace where tourists probably don't dare to go. All I remember us doing was stuffing our faces with a non-ending stream of what I think were chargrilled lamb ribs. Whatever it was, it was delicious.
austinspotter.wordpress.com

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: casinterest, YVRLTN and 13 guests