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SheikhDjibouti
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:05 pm

Braybuddy wrote:
But there is no "R" in the prononuciation of Peugeot in French. There will always be variations in the pronunciation of foreign words, but I can't understand why English speakers would insert a letter when there is none.

But there is no "R" in the pronunciation of Peugeot in English either.
So I don't understand your problem.

Alright, so maybe I do a bit.
There are two extreme versions of the word Peugeot, one with the letter "R", and one with a glottal-stop instead.
FYI a glottal stop is what you get if you say "war'er" instead of "water". The glottal stop is that uncomfortable break in the middle of the word water where the letter "t" should exist. Glottal stops can also act as a substitute for other letters, or for nothing at all if a particular dialect demands it. I'm sure you have heard the term Ba'athist Iraq.
(and now I'll have the NSA monitoring my e-mails..... :roll: )

Likewise, we can break the word Peugeot into two halves as follows; Peu'geot or maybe the even more brutal P'geot.
Except if go to that extreme, we need to distinguish between P = "pee", and P = "purr", but without the "rr"

However the degree of hesitation caused by the glottal stop, and indeed it's existence at all, will vary from region to region even within France, such that many will approach the "English" version where we smooth out the word, eliminating the clumsy break point, and say Purr-jho, as a single entity.
The letter "R" does not exist as a clear spoken element, even though I have doubled it in my example (Purr). It is simply a barely noticeable device to smoothly link between the two halves of the word (at least as I pronounce it), and as direct alternative to the glottal stop. Both French and English people find this version more agreeable.
If you can find an English speaker who emphasizes the "R" and makes a feature of it, for instance by rolling it, then I am happy to agree with you.

If you doubt any of the above; don't rely exclusively on the so-called experts on youtube; listen to a sales presentation by Peugeot themselves, in French, to a French audience!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXHJX-xzvF8
I recommend listening closely at 5m15s and 5m20s.

*(please note correct spelling of pronunciation, which I got wrong my own last post LOL)
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Braybuddy
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:17 pm

SheikhDjibouti wrote:
If you doubt any of the above; don't rely exclusively on the so-called experts on youtube; listen to a sales presentation by Peugeot themselves, in French, to a French audience!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXHJX-xzvF8
I recommend listening closely at 5m15s and 5m20s.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with my hearing, and I'm hearing Puh-jho, but listening to it over and over I can understand why someone would think there's an R sound in there, It's certainly far removed from the strong R often used English, which is very different to the French pronunciation. It comes across as an affectation, or even caricature.
 
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Aesma
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:56 pm

When it's quicker to slightly mispronounce things, I can understand it, and it will often catch on and become the nom, like "been" mentioned earlier.

Now when it makes it more difficult to pronounce, and is said in the "hood" as a form of slang, I'm not so sure. There will always be more people that want to dissociate themselves from the hood than people who want to adopt that way of talking.

In France instead of mispronouncing things (although that happens too) the "hood" way to talk is to reverse syllables in words. For example Arabe (Arab) becomes Beur. This happened decades ago, so newer generations have, you guessed it, reversed it again, creating the word Rebeu.
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FTMCPIUS
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:54 pm

Every once in a while someone will ask me for a “pacific” example of something. Another is when I am occasionally asked what my “heigth” is. After I tell them I am tempted to ask them if they would also like to know my weigth.
 
L1011
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:51 am

I hate to hear intelligent people mispronounce "sherbet." It is not pronounced "sherbert," it is "sher-bet." I even saw it spelled "sherbert" in a food counter in Puerto Rico Airport.

Bob Bradley
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BCal Dc10
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:28 am

My bugbears are all part of being born British but now living in America as an American.
So obviously they are tooooo numerous to mention. Soooo many mispronounciations. :D :D :D

My favourites are “herb”. Don’t say “erb”. There is an H there. Don’t waste it. It’s a perfectly useful H. Everyone after me - “Herb”

Not leaving Australians out - I used to live in Melbourne - did quite a lot of work in Sandringham, outside the city. There is no H in Sandringham.

And don’t get me started on Anthony - since when did Anthony have a th th th like thing? It’s Antony.

Before I my edit runs out - one more - KNOWN. It sounds like to looks. KNOWN. It isn’t KNOWEN. So why say KNOWEN? Are you a bogen? Don’t do it.

My work here is done....... ;)
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sun Oct 29, 2017 6:55 pm

L1011 wrote:
I hate to hear intelligent people mispronounce "sherbet." It is not pronounced "sherbert," it is "sher-bet." I even saw it spelled "sherbert" in a food counter in Puerto Rico Airport.

Bob Bradley

Sherbet (coming from the Arabic sharba and Turkish şerbet) is most likely the original spelling, but the variation "sherbert" has been in existence since the word was accepted in English and both are recognized as acceptable spellings for the frozen treat.

That being said, PR is not exactly the birthplace of English. We have a frozen treat called a "Lindbergh" (after Charles Lindbergh who was described as having a cold personality when he visited San Juan) yet people ask for a "limbel" or limber" (leem-bell or leem-behr).

Puerto Ricans bastardize English to the point where they ask for "conflei" (con-flay...aka corn flakes), "sangüich" (san-gwich...aka sandwhich), "palking" (pahl-kin...aka parking) and "chistris" (cheese-trees...aka cheese treats), among others. And you'll see them spelled in many different ways and posted in a lot of places as well.
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WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:11 pm

stlgph wrote:
Matenance.


-hanger :-)
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WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:16 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
To be honest - the english language per se is prone to not being spoken correctly.

Firstly, it's used as a mother language in many parts of the world so dialects just evolve naturally.

Secondly, even if we take the Oxford English Dictionary as the holy grail of the English Language how can you then get not confused when similar looking words are correctly pronounced differently? Just look at "tough", "though", "through", "thought". Four words with "ough" in the middle - but four different ways of pronounciation!


that is because of the things the kribb house whore did:
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~beatrice/humor/purity.html

.. and start out from munging at least 3 unrelated languages for a foundation.
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scbriml
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:21 am

I used to have a Norwegian boss who's name was Jostein. At first I was unsure how to pronounce it, so I just listened to how he answered his phone. Then it became clear he pronounced it as Yostain. I used to get annoyed for him when every American at work (we worked for an American company, so there were a few around!) always called him "Yo-steen" like they were saying "Yo dude!"
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Kiwirob
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Nov 01, 2017 10:15 am

I like watching cooking programs, one of my peeves is how Americans can't say herbs, it's not erbs, there's an H in it, you need to pronounce the H!!
 
WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:33 pm

Kiwirob wrote:
I like watching cooking programs, one of my peeves is how Americans can't say herbs, it's not erbs, there's an H in it, you need to pronounce the H!!


No you don't.
It is two different things.

"Herbs"
and
"erbs", some portmanteau for ketsup enhanced with modified starch? :-)
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Tugger
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:26 pm

Speaking of "H", how about "history"? Some say "an history" but it's "a history" if you pronounce the "H".

Tugg
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zckls04
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:40 pm

Tugger wrote:
Speaking of "H", how about "history"? Some say "an history" but it's "a history" if you pronounce the "H".

Tugg


The usual rule is that you say "a history", but "an historic event". If the first syllable of the "h" word is stressed, you use "a". Otherwise you use "an".

Think it's (rightly) dying out a bit now though.
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csturdiv
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Nov 02, 2017 1:47 am

Often times "terrorism" is mispronounced as "truck attack".

And as an American, when I hear my Aussie coworkers pronounce schedule with an emphasis on the H, that just sounds wrong.
An American expat from the ORD area living and working in SYD
 
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VapourTrails
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:18 am

csturdiv wrote:
And as an American, when I hear my Aussie coworkers pronounce schedule with an emphasis on the H, that just sounds wrong.


With the large dose of American television in Australia, I always believed it was pronounced 'skedule' and when pointed out it is 'shedule', I said ...is it?? :boggled:

Occasionally now it is 'shedule' to me, but most of the time it is still 'skedule' - I'm too old to change over completely now. Too much Internet, YouTube and Netflix - my excuse. :thumbsup:

That is another one by the way, 'scuse me' for excuse.
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WarRI1
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:37 am

We in US say Jaguar. (Automobile) In Britain it is pronounced JagUar. I guess both are correct.
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:57 am

Expresso when people mean Espresso. I hear that a lot so surprised not to see it mentioned yet.

I used to work with a lady from Tennessee that got all manner of things wrong...cartridges in her knees instead of cartilage. Office supplieseses instead of supplies! Some were hilarious!

zckls04 wrote:
Where I live there's a street called "Versailles" which is pronounced by most locals as "Ver-Sails". When I pronounce it "Vair-sye" people think I'm being pretentious.

My wife and I often bicker about it, so to annoy her I pronounce "Buena Vista" as "Byoona Vista", which is apparently what people used to call it in the 1950s.


Ha! I ran into this when I lived in Virginia. There is a Huguenot Road in Richmond that I pronounced Hugh-jze-no, whereas locally it is H-yoo-ge-knot! I got some weird looks for that.

There is also a small town, Buena Vista, that I pronounced B-when-a whereas locals go for the B-yoon-a that you mention.
"My first job was selling doors, door to door, that's a tough job innit" - Bill Bailey
 
WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:20 am

zckls04 wrote:
Tugger wrote:
Speaking of "H", how about "history"? Some say "an history" but it's "a history" if you pronounce the "H".

Tugg


The usual rule is that you say "a history", but "an historic event". If the first syllable of the "h" word is stressed, you use "a". Otherwise you use "an".

Think it's (rightly) dying out a bit now though.


http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educat ... -versus-an

also hitting on the Herb vs Erb thing.

"Erb" seems to be the accepted American pronunciation?

https://www.etymonline.com/word/an
https://www.etymonline.com/word/a
funny a/an is derived from "one". as in ONE item, ....
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 3:50 am

VapourTrails wrote:
csturdiv wrote:
And as an American, when I hear my Aussie coworkers pronounce schedule with an emphasis on the H, that just sounds wrong.


With the large dose of American television in Australia, I always believed it was pronounced 'skedule' and when pointed out it is 'shedule', I said ...is it?? :boggled:

Occasionally now it is 'shedule' to me, but most of the time it is still 'skedule' - I'm too old to change over completely now. Too much Internet, YouTube and Netflix - my excuse. :thumbsup:

That is another one by the way, 'scuse me' for excuse.


Another one that gets me is when I see a commercial, I think for the dishwasher packets. The word is capsule, and on the commercial they say it like cap-sh-ule. Not sure if it is the Aussie accent or not, after three years here now I find it hard to even hear an accent most of the time.
An American expat from the ORD area living and working in SYD
 
seb146
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:14 am

People trying to blend in with a certain region and making things worse. I can not pronounce some of the place names in the Northeast or some of the First Nations village names in Canada. I only know how to properly pronounce Iqaluit because I would listen to the weather report on CBC every so often. I am not even going to try Kuujjuaq until I hear a native say it a few hundred times.

The one that really gets to me, and has been causing tension in my relationship, is the city of Eugene. We were just there last week looking for someplace to live. Growing up, we always said yoo-JEAN. But, the brosband (my partner) insists on pronouncing it YOO-jean. Drives me up the wall. Don't get me started on Puyallup.
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:16 am

And if I may ask what person invented that the idea Lieutenant is to be pronounced "Lef-tenant"?

Tugg
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 8:49 am

I hate the way a lot of English people say draw-ring instead of how it is spelled - draw-ing. There's only one r in the word. South African English where people refuse to use 're - i.e. "We going on holiday and you coming too and we very happy about that!"

Also the habit English people have of changing an e sound to ay when confronted with a foreign word - Pesayta instead of peseeta - the former Spanish currency. Zimbabway instead of Zimbabwee etc.

I suppose the so named Received Middle English is the norm and anything else is a variation either due to a specific country's accent or the way language is modified by both native and non-native speakers. Movies also have a big influence on pronunciation.
A300 310 319 320 321 332 343 346 380 ATR42 Bae146 707 720 721 722 732 733 734 735 738 741 742 743 744 74D SP 752 762 763 772 1-11400 500 Concorde DC3 DC910 30 50 DC10-30 MD11 Trident 1 2 3 Dash 7 DH6 Do228 328 F27 28 HS 748 LX45 L1011200 Viscount 700 800
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:03 am

csturdiv wrote:
The word is capsule, and on the commercial they say it like cap-sh-ule. Not sure if it is the Aussie accent or not, after three years here now I find it hard to even hear an accent most of the time.

For me at least, it depends on the context, a capsule in terms of a carriage, like a baby capsule or space capsule e.g. is usually pronounced the way it’s written, but a tablet form of capsule e.g. dishwasher, or medicinal, is always cap-sh-ule.

IMHO at the end of the day, as long as the person I am speaking to understands what I am saying, that is all that really matters.

Aussie accent.. you will hear it after you leave the country for some time and return LOL. That is when I first ‘heard it’ ..anyway.

Where are these emojis on Tapatalk..


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VapourTrails
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:12 pm

einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

The Grammar Nazi in me is alive and well and I am tempted to correct them on the spot; others have done so and the coworker insists it's a "hood" way of pronouncing things.


It seems that society is much more accepting of it nowadays? Forty years ago when I was learning to read and write, grammar was corrected and deemed important to learn correctly and a lot of emphasis was placed on it. Saying that, habits form as you get older.

I find that the written word I am much more keen to pick up on and correct. It seems that more value is also on printed or written words bring correct, than speaking them..

I am not an fan of hash tagging words by the way, it is such a misuse of the English language and looks awful! #badinventions


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RoySFlying
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 1:54 am

N14AZ wrote:
I was told be a well respected senior economist that the plural of cost is cost.


According to your economist, maybe. Would it not depend on the circumstance in which the word is used. Would not "cost" be a total or a summation, whereas "costs" would indicate or suggest separate figures. "What is the cost of a train ticket?" compared to "what are the costs involved in a journey to Spain?"

Certainly, my old OED from 1964 records "costs" as the plural of cost, but then the compilers of the OED are not economists. ;)

Things are further confused when cost is used as a verb rather than a noun. "How much does it cost?" - "It costs twenty dollars."
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DLFREEBIRD
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 2:58 am

working at the airport for 30 years. i don't care how people pronounce words as long as i can understand them. I have become very tolerant with people with heavy accents, people struggling to speak English . I have great tolerance and respect for them. I had no idea people got so upset about someone mispronouncing words.

i have been in Paris trying to speak my high school french and did such a horrible job that somebody rolled heir eyes and begged me to just speak English. I don't want to be that person for those visiting the U.S. Granted this is my profession and i signed up for it. Still i am surprised at the lack of tolerance by some members.
 
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N14AZ
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 5:21 am

RoySFlying wrote:
N14AZ wrote:
I was told be a well respected senior economist that the plural of cost is cost.


According to your economist, maybe. Would it not depend on the circumstance in which the word is used. Would not "cost" be a total or a summation, whereas "costs" would indicate or suggest separate figures. "What is the cost of a train ticket?" compared to "what are the costs involved in a journey to Spain?"

Certainly, my old OED from 1964 records "costs" as the plural of cost, but then the compilers of the OED are not economists. ;)

Thanks for your feedback. It was always in conjunction to project costs or investment costs (yes, I am using now the plural and I am now even convinced that it's correct) and operation costs with or without depreciation etc.

"What is the cost of a train ticket?"
Even here it might depend on who is asking. A student at a train station after a sobering look into his wallet would say "cost" meaning how much do I have to pay whereas an economist would ask what are costs as the total of energy cost, depreciation cost of the train, personnel cost, fees for the train station ... abrasion of the tracks ... etc.

In the German language we use the plural ("Kosten", the "n" standing for the plural) only, there is no singular for cost/costs in the German language, which - I think - makes sense because all costs are always the total of a multitude of different cost groups, even if it's just a lollipop

------ sorry, this was possibly off-topic because this thread is about pronunciations, not about grammar --------

In Romania, I had one colleague, he always said "bed" instead of "bad". He once come back from a site visit and said to me "oh, Mr. N14AZ, the pumps are in bed status"... this became a running joke
 
skywaymanaz
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 8:16 am

I listen to a lot of audio books when I travel to pass the hours. I've heard several words mispronounced by the narrators but they're mostly minor. The one that was really jarring was in Space by James Michener. The narrator pronounced Apollo 11 as Apollo 2 several times. I'm guessing he thought 11 was II and maybe the font in the script wasn't as clear as it could have been. Although it is a such a defining moment in the 20th century that it's a very odd thing to get wrong. One Senator in the book comments after the moon landing they can finally get on with other things now. I couldn't help but think they want to cancel the space program after only Apollo 2?
 
WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 10:28 am

DLFREEBIRD wrote:
Still i am surprised at the lack of tolerance by some members.


Tolerance is not showing your irritation :-)
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WIederling
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 10:43 am

N14AZ wrote:
..........


You have day to day colloquial use of language. ( usually the design basis of a living language )

Then you have the various DSL ( as in domain specific language ) use of quite often the same vocabulary
which can clash rather well when the name space is not clear.


When AEG was taken over by the Edzard Reuter led Mercedes Benz and our little company of 50 "ingested" by AEG
we had massive issues from the change over in organizational structure and behavior ( Big Books from AEG and
all the dialect changes from MB over AEG as added trickle down.

Nothing worked anymore. ..except buying a Mercedes Benz under an "employee benefits" scheme.

To top it off some inbecile handed out chits with "how many percent productive" each employee was deemed to be.
Secretaries 0%, Engineers 100% :-)

Image the uproar and high pitched screaming.

New Bookkeeping had not thought about translating their DSL use of "productive" .
i.e. how much of your worktime was to be a subitem of some other workers ancillary cost.
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Redd
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 11:24 am

Antartic instead of Antarctic
Cannidate instead of Candidate
Expresso instead of Espresso (there is no excuse for this one in this day and age (not this day in age :D )) Talking to you Americans..... :P
Pedagogy ---> C'mon just give it a try
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seb146
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Nov 04, 2017 5:58 pm

Another thing that irritates me: People who put an "M" in sandwich and say or-ee-gone and Artic instead of Arctic. I know it is not mispronunciation but it also causes me physical pain when people say "ATM machine."
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Zentraedi
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:37 pm

People who pronounce "bruschetta" like it's German. Come on, does it look like pork knuckle and sour kraut? It's Italian. "bru-sKetta".
karaoke - it's "kah-rah-oh-kay", not "carry-oh-key"
Kyocera - it's "kyo-say-rah", not "key-oh-ser-a"
 
FTMCPIUS
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:39 am

Reelator instead of realtor

Hunderd instead or hundred

Rekenize instead of recognize
 
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AirAfreak
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:58 am

Bolognese is commonly mispronounced here in the U.S.A. - it should sound “bowl-oh-nyehzay.”

Pizzeria - as “peet zer ee yah” instead of “pitz erria”

Continental - as “cotinetal” instead of “CoNtineNtal”

Nuclear - as “Nu que lehr” instead of “nu-klear”

Foie Gras - as “fwah gwah” instead of “fwuh ghrah”

Voila - as “wal lah” instead of “vwah lah”

Chipotle as “chih poll tee” instead of “chi poht lay”

The list goes on and on and on...
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FTMCPIUS
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:53 pm

and on ...

Sludge hammer instead of sledge hammer
Comf-tur-bull instead of comfortable
Ashfault instead of asphalt
Anyways or anyhoo instead of anyway
Probly instead of probably
 
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jnev3289
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:38 pm

How do you say this though? $1,000,000 question
Image
 
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BobPatterson
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:45 am

jnev3289 wrote:
How do you say this though? $1,000,000 question
Image

Inedible: /ˌinˈedəb(ə)l/
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Dec 07, 2017 7:51 pm

OA412 wrote:
einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

I really think it's just a Black cultural/vernacular thing, particularly for Black people from the South. I also know highly educated Black people who say "aks."

African American Vernacular English, it's a thing:

Use of metathesized forms like aks for "ask"[43] or graps for "grasp".

For me the thing that currently annoys me is saying "I eat McDonalds", instead of "I eat at McDonalds". These days, at is optional, even though it comes across that the speaker eats a building or a corporation.

zckls04 wrote:
Where I live there's a street called "Versailles" which is pronounced by most locals as "Ver-Sails". When I pronounce it "Vair-sye" people think I'm being pretentious.

My wife and I often bicker about it, so to annoy her I pronounce "Buena Vista" as "Byoona Vista", which is apparently what people used to call it in the 1950s.

Similar for "Calais". Some need to pronounce it as Calas, some Calaize, some Calai.

BCal Dc10 wrote:
My bugbears are all part of being born British but now living in America as an American.
So obviously they are tooooo numerous to mention. Soooo many mispronounciations. :D :D :D

My favourites are “herb”. Don’t say “erb”. There is an H there. Don’t waste it. It’s a perfectly useful H. Everyone after me - “Herb”

Not leaving Australians out - I used to live in Melbourne - did quite a lot of work in Sandringham, outside the city. There is no H in Sandringham.

And don’t get me started on Anthony - since when did Anthony have a th th th like thing? It’s Antony.

Before I my edit runs out - one more - KNOWN. It sounds like to looks. KNOWN. It isn’t KNOWEN. So why say KNOWEN? Are you a bogen? Don’t do it.

My work here is done....... ;)

In CT we have the Thames River and it gets pronounced as Thames not Temes, but this drives certain people crazy.

CT also has a town called Derby which gets pronounced as Derby not Darby. This is a bit easier to adapt to, but still upsets a few.

NH has BER-lin not Ber-LIN or Ber-LEEN. Locals tell me that the pronunciation was adjusted during WWI.
The gun is NOT a precious symbol of freedom
It is a deadly cancer on American society
Those who believe otherwise are consumed by an ideology
That is impervious to evidence
 
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BobPatterson
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Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:18 am

Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:51 pm

Revelation wrote:
In CT we have the Thames River and it gets pronounced as Thames not Temes, but this drives certain people crazy.

Where I used to enjoy watching Yale row against Haaavaad.
Facts are fragile things. Treat them with care. Sources are important. Alternative facts do not exist.
 
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Revelation
Posts: 16649
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 9:37 pm

Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:31 pm

BobPatterson wrote:
Revelation wrote:
In CT we have the Thames River and it gets pronounced as Thames not Temes, but this drives certain people crazy.

Where I used to enjoy watching Yale row against Haaavaad.

I remember going to the Yale Bowl to watch Yale play Haaavaaad.

Froze my bum off.

We had hot chili in our pre-game tailgating party.

It froze from the time you put it on your spoon till the time you got it in your mouth.

In the men's room there were the old trough style urinals.

I thought it'd be beneath the Yalies to pee on the wall, but that's what they did.

Also saw the NY Giants play at Yale Bowl back in the 70s.

The first Giant Stadium was being built in the Meadowlands so they played their "home" games in New Haven.

Apropos to this thread, locals don't say "New Haven", they say "N' Haven". If you don't say it that way, chances are you're a Yalie.
The gun is NOT a precious symbol of freedom
It is a deadly cancer on American society
Those who believe otherwise are consumed by an ideology
That is impervious to evidence
 
frankly73
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:14 am

Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:48 am

Probably = prob-a-blee, not prob-lee or prolly.
 
WIederling
Posts: 4675
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2015 2:15 pm

Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Dec 13, 2017 5:16 pm

BobPatterson wrote:
jnev3289 wrote:
How do you say this though? $1,000,000 question
http://mammaskitchenva.com/wp-content/u ... 7/gyro.jpg

Inedible: /ˌinˈedəb(ə)l/

Open face burger :-)
Murphy is an optimist

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