hoons90
Posts: 3159
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2001 10:15 pm

Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Mon Aug 06, 2001 11:59 pm

Some 757-200s have 2 doors on the middle and some dont. Why is that?
The biggest mistake made by most human beings: Listening to only half, understanding just a quarter and telling double.
 
vincent32
Posts: 336
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2000 7:40 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 1:55 am

By 10 doors I suppose that you mean 6 actual "doors" and 4 window exits. If thats the case, it is the airlines choice how that want the emergency exit configuration. It can be a total of 8 doors (4 on each side) or 6 doors and 4 window exits (3 doors and 2 window exits on each side).
I believe that on the 757-300's it is standard to have 12 exits, 8 doors and 4 windows.

Hope that helps.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
"If it was cool to be a fool, I'd be the hippest guy around"
 
Guest

RE:Vincent

Tue Aug 07, 2001 2:05 am

You couldnt be further from the truth. The reason why some 757's only hav one window exit on each side is because those were the origianl 757's.. Look at Northwest for example...


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Frank Schaefer




These 757's are non ETOPS. Meaning they are not certified to fly over large bodies of water (Atlantic Ocean, to Hawaii etc...)

Look at Continental's and United Airlines 757's...


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Chris Sheldon




Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Andy Martin



Hope this clears that up.

 Smile/happy/getting dizzy




 
Guest

RE: RE:Vincent

Tue Aug 07, 2001 2:08 am

That Continental 757 was kinda hard to see, I think I linked it to the wrong photo..


Here you go...



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Jay Davis




 
modesto2
Posts: 2681
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2000 3:44 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 2:32 am

With all due respect to Boeing757Fan, I would like to make some corrections:

"You couldnt be further from the truth. The reason why some 757's only hav one window exit on each side is because those were the origianl 757's.. Look at Northwest for example..."

The aircraft's original date of delivery has no bearing on the exits. Delta operates all 757's with 10 exits, yet they started taking deliveries on 2/28/85. According to Boeing757Fan, Northwest's 757's are old. However, NW also took its first 757 delivery on 2/28/85. Using this reasoning, both airlines should operate their 757's with 8 exits. However, we know this isn't true.

Additionally, I'm not sure if I have interpreted this statement correctly but ETOPS does not affect the number of exits. Ethiopian operates several 757-260ER yet these aircraft have 10 exits, the same number of exits as United and Continental's NON-ETOPS 757's.

Finally, ETOPS is not limited to over-water flying. It is more specifically defined as twin engine operations over large expanses of land, water, etc. with NO diversion airport(s). Thus, you could be theoretically cruising over land but if there's no diversion airport, then the aircraft would require some type of ETOPS certification.
 
Guest

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 3:10 am

Ok, I should have explained myself better. The older 757's that you were referring to did only have 1 exit above each wing. Northwest's first batch had this configuration. The second batch had 2 exits above each wing. I believe this is the same for most airlines that took the early deliveries and had later deliveries. ETOPS does have more to do than the exits, but, I guess it is part of it to have this configuration. I know I would like to have extra exits in case of a water landing...

here you go...

(I do know what I am talking about when it comes to the 757.. I dont just rattle on and on about something I dont have a clue about)  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

It is true I dont know the specifics about ETOPS.


2 exits above each wing... This is a newr one.

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Daniel Werner



One of the first ones

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Frank Schaefer





Delta is different. I cant figure that one out.

??






 
Red Panda
Posts: 1433
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2000 12:58 pm

RE:

Tue Aug 07, 2001 4:06 am

I believe Boeing757fan knows what he is talking about. And I also believe that Boeing757fan knows what ETOPS is.

when we have to refer to ETOPS, we don't wanna define it everytime when we say it. ( which is ETOPS is assumed as prior knowledge.)


wz respect to all // r panda
 
vincent32
Posts: 336
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2000 7:40 am

RE: RE:Vincent

Tue Aug 07, 2001 4:07 am

Sorry for the wrong info guys.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
"If it was cool to be a fool, I'd be the hippest guy around"
 
tupolev154b2
Posts: 1269
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2000 9:01 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 4:11 am

Are there still models with 1 door over the wing produced?
 
User avatar
Crosswind
Posts: 2537
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2000 4:34 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 8:26 am

Hi Boeing757fan!

There have never been any 757s produced with a single overwing exit on each side, the emergency exits are located behind the wing on aircraft that do not have overwing exits.

There always appears to be some confusion about the exits on the 757, and why there are 2 layouts.

To address the initial question, whether airlines choose to have their B757-200s with 6 Doors/2 Emergency Exits or 6 Doors/4 Overwing Exits is entirely down to their own preferences. There are no regulatory requirements, ETOPS or otherwise, that require a particular exit layout for a particular type of mission.

The only additional rules for ETOPS flights regarding exits are the additional liferafts required on the 757, which are stored in the roof or in overhead lockers adjacent to an exit - but the either exit layout is acceptable for ETOPS flights.

In fact the 757 without overwing exits is preferable for ETOPS missions because the liferaft can be placed out of the door directly into the water, and the slides from emergency exits 3L and 3R can be used as rafts. With overwing exits the liferafts have to be dragged over the wing into the water and the overwing slides don't detatch, so they cant be used as rafts!

The exit layout is also not an indication of an aircraft's age. Both configurations have been available since the start of the B757 programme...

All Delta's B757s have had 2 overwing exits from the first deliveries in 1985 to today.
All British Airways' B757s have a single emergency exit behind each wing from the first deliveries in 1982 to the last ones in 1997.

For reasons of commonality once a 757 operator has chosen an exit layout, whichever they prefer, there is very little chance of them changing that layout. The fact that Northwest did is an anomaly, and too much should not be read into their decision - I am unaware of the reasoning behind it.

As a quick summary, here are current operators by exit layout;

6 Doors/ 2 Emergency Exits
AeroMexico
Air 2000 (ETOPS)
Air Holland (ETOPS)
Air Transat (ETOPS)
Airtours (ETOPS)
America West
ATA (ETOPS)
Arkia (ETOPS)
Atlas
Avianca
Azerbaijan Airlines
Balair
Britannia Airways (ETOPS)
Britannia Airways AB (ETOPS)
British Airways (ETOPS)
British World Airlines
Canada 3000 Airlines (ETOPS)
China Southern Airlines
China Southwest Airlines
Finnair (ETOPS)
Greenlandair
Guyana Airways 2000
Icelandair (ETOPS)
JMC Airlines
LAPA Argentina
LTE International
LTU International Airways (ETOPS)
Mexicana
Monarch Airlines (ETOPS)
National Airlines
North American Airlines (ETOPS)
Northwest Airlines
Orient Eagle Airways
Royal Air Maroc
Royal Brunei Airlines (ETOPS)
South Atlantic Airways
TACV Cape Verde Airlines (ETOPS)
Trans World Airlines – TWA (ETOPS)
Transavia (ETOPS)
Turkmenistan International
US Airways
Uzbekistan Airways (ETOPS)

6 Doors/4 Overwing Exits
American Airlines (ETOPS)
Condor (ETOPS)
Continental Airlines (ETOPS)
Delta Airlines
Dutch Bird
EL AL Israel Airlines (ETOPS)
Ethiopian Airlines
Far Eastern Air Transport
Iberia
Icelandair (ETOPS)
Mexicana
National Airlines
Northwest Airlines
Royal Nepal Airlines
Shanghai Airlines
United Airlines (ETOPS)
Xiamen Airlines

As you can see, your assertion that airlines have changed from one layout to another to meet regulatory rules is incorrect.

Only Northwest, National, Mexicana and Icelandair operate both versions, and the latter 3 only through second hand aircraft acquisitions. And far more airlines operate ETOPS flights without overwing exits than with.

Hope that helped clarify things slightly...I'm open to any corrections on the above list and have excluded Corporate and Military operators of the 757.

Regards
CROSSWIND
 
Notar520AC
Posts: 1517
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2001 6:53 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 9:37 am

I think that's a lot of doors for a 75.

-Notar520AC
BMW - The Ultimate Driving Machine
 
ny-jfk-lga
Posts: 331
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2000 2:09 am

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 11:56 am

Ok, I don't know what this is about. But I can tell you about some of our 757 exits. I'm an Inflight Steward for NW. First, we have two types of 757s in our fleet, the 5500 series and the 5600series. The 5500s seem to be a bit older because the interior, meaning the passenger systems like the overhead reading lights and buttons ect show age. Those are the ones with "door 3", meaning that small emergency exit behind the wing which is always armed at that. Then the 5600s, are the newest ones, which have the four overwing windown exits and lack the door 3. I hope this clears up some of it for you guys. The 757-300s will be a combination of both of the above, it'll be just awesome.
Bring back McDonnell Douglas & T W A!!
 
gmjh_air
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Aug 09, 2000 4:37 pm

RE: Why On Some 757-200s Are There 10 Doors?

Tue Aug 07, 2001 2:19 pm

The number and/or types of "doors" on an aircraft is ONLY decided by the evacuation requirements based on getting a full load of passengers out of the aircraft in a certain time.
There might be many different configurations conforming to this requirement and I don't know any specifics about any of them, however all manufacturers and initial operators strive to get an as good layout as possible (reduced weight and easy operation) and then I believe most other operators follow that design (provided they have the same number of maximum seats.



Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos