delta fly boy
Posts: 215
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 7:16 pm

Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 8:59 am

I heard something from a friend living out near SNA that interested me... He told me that because of the "rich neighborhood" in the surrounding area, that the planes have a greater takeoff rate of ascent, and then they turn off their engines and glide over Newport beach. Now, I know I don't know much about the whole aspect of flying planes... but this just sounds VERY odd to me... any input or clarification would be great... thanks
-FlyBoy
 
boeingmd82
Posts: 231
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2001 11:14 am

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:03 am

A pilot that flys out of SNA may be able to verify this, but I belive your friend is right. They don't actually turn off the engines, but they throttle back and fly over newport beach, the add power again to reach cruise.

SNA has many restrictions, including, no AC larger than 757 and only stage 3 equipment that can climb at a certain FPM, I'm not sure what the exact number is though.

BMD82
 
delta fly boy
Posts: 215
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 7:16 pm

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:07 am

thanx!!
 
Guest

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:17 am

Yeah the go screaming down the runway, climb to about 800 feet (I think some airplanes go a bit higher) and then power back and lower the nose. The resume normal climb when over the ocean. It is quite something to watch, but a painfor us little guys who fly out of there and have to aviod there wake turbulance!
Iain
 
delta fly boy
Posts: 215
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 7:16 pm

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:26 am

Very interesting.. thanx.. so when they "power back" is it very noticable both inside and outside of the a/c?
 
MATSUMOTO
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:55 pm

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:37 am

Living in Newport Beach, I fly out of Orange County a lot. It is correct that it's a very steep climb and then they "power back". I've been on several flight where the captains have explained the procedure to so that people do not become alarmed. And yes, it's very noticable!!!!
 
BA
Posts: 10134
Joined: Fri May 19, 2000 11:06 am

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 9:53 am

How are landings?
"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
 
Boeingfan
Posts: 369
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2001 1:47 am

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 10:03 am

It is true. Is this really a safety hazard or a good neighbor comprimise?

I have flown out of John Wayne many times and as prior said, the Capt. usually alert the passengers to the steep climb then level off. It is great if you have a window seat and just have to sit back and watch your feet rise above your head.

It must be more presure for the crew in the front?

 
Guest

RE: Boeingmd82

Sat Sep 01, 2001 11:13 am

SNA has many restrictions, including, no AC larger than 757 and only stage 3 equipment that can climb at a certain FPM, I'm not sure what the exact number is though.

WRONG!

SNA has FEDEX A310's and A300's daily.


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Guest

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 12:42 pm

It's a precise procedure, but not dangerous in and of itself. I have often thought should one of the engines quit turning, I would not be in my most ideal situation with the engines powered back, and nose still up high. But should that one in a million chance happen, it is still controllable.

The procedure calls for a more rapid rotation, and higher than normal climb angle, followed by a reduced thrust climb out to the ocean. Our airline does the "cutback" at 1000 feet. The cutback power setting is a function of the aircraft weight and is predetermined before departure.

The other half of the equation is following the localizer back course exactly for the first mile, that keeps you on the right track and the sensors on the ground from sounding the noise alarms which results in angry letters to your airline.

I think it's a silly procedure, and I don't think it's as safe as a normal departure procedure, but it certainly is not dangerous either, one just must fly it carefully.

As for landing, it's a short runway, but there aren't any special procedures for landing. Just look out for all that VFR traffic all over the place.



 
AAR90
Posts: 3140
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2000 11:51 am

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 12:48 pm

Since I'm based there, this Captain usually forgets the noise abatement PA. In the 737-800 it really isn't that noticably different, but in the MD90 it was very noticable (you couldn't going to attempt to stand even if you wanted to).  Big grin

No, we don't shut off the engines. There is a significantly greater thrust reduction than normal until over the ocean and 3,000 or 4,000 feet altitude.

Yes, it is for noise abatement only. If _anything_ goes wrong (or simply not "perfect"), the noise abatement profile goes out the window and we fly to keep everybody safe --haven't had to do that, but its briefed before every takeoff.  Wink/being sarcastic
*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
 
sccutler
Posts: 5580
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2000 12:16 pm

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 1:01 pm

Oh, the SNA takeoffs-

Back when I flew in 'n' out of John Wayne all the time, I always enjoyed watching for reactions from those who had never experienced the "ride"- a few dropped jaws and concerned looks.

It was always fun, but especially so when the 757s, with their very steep climb profile, began operating there in (as I recall) 1987.
...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
 
modesto2
Posts: 2671
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2000 3:44 am

RE: Takeoffs From SNA

Sat Sep 01, 2001 1:32 pm

Before I moved to Newport Beach this summer, I had briefly heard of this special procedure. Luckily, I had the opportunity to experience it first hand in July on WN690. As others have mentioned, one of the pilots explained the procedure prior to take-off. Once we aligned with 19R, we powered up and the brakes were released. After rotation, we climbed to 1000' when the throttles were retarded. The flaps were still deployed and we commenced a slow climb over the ocean. At approximately 6 DME (about 3000'), the flaps were stowed and power was restored. It was a very exciting experience and I could definitely feel the significant drop in power. The most obvious signs are the engine noise dying and the lack of kick in your pants feeling. Unfortunately, that's probably the only time I'll ever fly out of SNA. The girl behind me was a nervous flier; her anxiety was only compounded with this unique climb. Good stuff!!!