Ndebele
Topic Author
Posts: 2847
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2001 3:16 am

"Cut Here In Emergency"

Sat Sep 08, 2001 4:48 pm

Hi everybody!

On nearly all aircraft, you can see a little zone marked (about 50cm x 50cm), with the words "Cut here in emergency" written on it. Maybe this is a silly question, but: Who is supposed to cut the fuselage? In what kind of emergency?

I really can't think of any emergency where it would be necessary to cut a hole into the fuselage, instead of using the emergency exits. How long does it take to cut a hole into the fuselage - too long in case of an emergency. And what's so special about this particular zone, why not cutting the fuselage anywhere else?

Sorry but I really can't figure out what that zone is for. Can anybody help?

Thanks in advance,
Ndebele.
 
User avatar
solnabo
Posts: 5020
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:53 am

RE:

Sat Sep 08, 2001 4:54 pm

Fire!!! They punch a hole there and spraying water into the fusulage??????? Thats my theory anyway
Airbus SAS - Love them both
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: "Cut Here In Emergency"

Sat Sep 08, 2001 5:53 pm

Those areas are where rescue personnel can cut through the fuselage without undue difficulty caused by hitting structure or hot electricaly lines under the skin of the aircraft for example.

OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
 
Ndebele
Topic Author
Posts: 2847
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2001 3:16 am

RE: "Cut Here In Emergency"

Sat Sep 08, 2001 7:24 pm

Thanks for that information, L-188! But don't you think it takes much too long to cut a hole into the fuselage in case of emergency? If I were rescue personnel, I'd simply take any exit/emergency exit to get into the aircraft?!
 
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apuneger
Posts: 2964
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2000 2:43 pm

RE: "Cut Here In Emergency"

Sat Sep 08, 2001 7:37 pm

Personally, I think airliner manufacturers are obliged to make such areas, in case of jammed or blocked emergency exits.

For instance, what if a B777 makes an emergency landing, and stops somewhere in between two hangars (you never know), thus blocking all possible exits? In this case, emergency workers can easily access the aircraft by cutting into the fuselage at those specific areas...

At least, that's my opinion. Anybody else??
Ivan Coninx - Brussels Aviation Photography
 
L-188
Posts: 29881
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 1999 11:27 am

RE: "Cut Here In Emergency"

Sat Sep 08, 2001 7:45 pm

Trust me....It doesn't take that long to hack through the side of an airplane with an axe. The skin probably will only be about .047 or .060 inches thick. Depending on the design, if it pressurized, ect. Aluminum that thick isn't going to stand up long to getting hit with a steel axe.

BTW does anybody have a picture of a real crash axe that they carry on the airport rigs? I am not talking that little thing that is carried on aircraft. My brother was describing one to me, he just got his FF1 rating and joined the VFD where he lives.

Anyway picture a full sized escape axe with the little pick on the head end. Just like the typical fire fighters axe. Except instead of a smother cutting blade like a normal axe has this one is sectioned out in little steps. They are not serations but steps.

Apparently from what he was telling me the steps are there to keep the axe from sliding off the edge of the aluminum sheet.
OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.