ramper@iah
Posts: 236
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2001 7:23 am

Essential Air Service In The South

Sun May 19, 2002 10:49 am

I'm trying to figure out what criteria is used to determine the amount of Essential Air Service a state receives. I've noticed that states in the West (North Dakota, Kansas, Utah, et.al) get far more flights than rural states in the South like Mississippi and Alabama. I wonder if EAS routes are considered "pork barrel" items in congress, and states with the more powerful congressmen get more government-funded airline service to remote cities.
 
IMissPiedmont
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Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 12:58 pm

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Sun May 19, 2002 10:52 am

I suspect it has to do with the fact that very few people in the southest US are 200 miles from an airport. In the states you mention, a 200 mile drive to an airline airport is not at all uncommon.
The day you stop learning is the day you should die.
 
delta-flyer
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Joined: Mon Jul 30, 2001 9:47 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Sun May 19, 2002 2:06 pm

Piedmont -- point well taken.

Also, you won't find many congressmen more powerful than the big kahuna from Mississippi -- Trent Lott! But the flights to MS seem to be doing well on their own.

Pete (from MS)
"In God we trust, everyone else bring data"
 
dc-9-10
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Joined: Mon Jul 12, 1999 11:45 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Sun May 19, 2002 2:37 pm

There is just one congressman more powerful than good ol Trent Lott, and that man is Tom Dashel from the great state of South Dakota. He is the only reason why my hometown (aty) still has air service.

Dc-9-10
 
FATFlyer
Posts: 4437
Joined: Fri May 18, 2001 4:12 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Mon May 20, 2002 1:27 am

The EAS regs require a city to be more than 70 miles from a large or medium hub (as defined by the gov't.), with a few exceptions. 200 miles only applies if the subsidy exceeds $200 per passenger. The twist is that every city with service in 1978 is essentially elligible, even NYC or LA, if they ever were in danger of losing all service.

There is a list of cities and subsidies as of Feb, 2001 that includes the distance from a large/med hub at:
http://ostpxweb.dot.gov/aviation/domav/feb15rates.xls
It is interesting to read. For example, Topeka just qualifies at 71 miles.
"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness." - Mark Twain
 
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Bruce
Posts: 4934
Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 2:46 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Mon May 20, 2002 1:51 am

Here in Alabama, the Muscle Shoals Airport receives this designation. it's about an hour away from Huntsville and a little more than 100 from memphis. It is served by only one airline - Northwest Airlink, with only 2 or 3 flights per day to Memphis, and those planes carry about 10 people per flight. Northwest wanted to pull out but they were barred from doing so. People who live there have such limited air service - they're forced to drive 60 miles to an airport that charges high rates for flights.

bruce
Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
 
deltairlines
Posts: 6876
Joined: Mon May 24, 1999 4:47 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Mon May 20, 2002 5:26 am

Could someone decipher that XLS site for me. I am quite lost in the maze seeing which airports are on there.

Thanks

Jeff
 
delta-flyer
Posts: 2631
Joined: Mon Jul 30, 2001 9:47 am

RE: Essential Air Service In The South

Mon May 20, 2002 6:16 am

Jeff,

Best to download target to your had disk, then open it with MS Excel.

Pete
"In God we trust, everyone else bring data"

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