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Load Factor!

Sat Sep 25, 1999 2:27 pm

The Load Factor, for the last time, is the weight supported by the wings. At level flight it is 1g, 60 degree bank it is at 2g's. It doesnt mean that if the plane MTOW is 250,000 lbs and it ways 125,000 lbs at take off that the load factor is 50%. Thank you for letting me vent. Enjoy the rest of the flight.
 
dash8
Posts: 389
Joined: Sat Aug 27, 2005 8:23 am

RE: Load Factor!

Sun Sep 26, 1999 2:24 am

Load factor is the percentage of actual load carried versus the maximum allowed by the specific airplane.
You read that in many airline articles in aviation magazine. They mention the average load factor on a specific route and also specify the "break even" load factor. This is one of the ways to determine profitability for a route.
What you are refering to is wing loading or wing load factor.

Dash8
 
Pilot1113
Posts: 2276
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 1999 1:42 pm

RE: Load Factor!

Sun Sep 26, 1999 1:29 pm

Why must we have 2 meanings for the same term?! I'm constantly confused by the Load Factor (for G's) and Load Factor (for pax)...


Can we have a different term for the pax meaning? How's about PaxProff? or maybe PaxSqueeze (for how much $$$ we can squeeze out of them and how we pack them in so tightly)?


- Neil Harrison
 
txagkuwait
Posts: 1388
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 1999 7:39 am

RE: Load Factor!

Sun Sep 26, 1999 4:52 pm

Excuse me?

Last time I checked load factor was the number of revenue passenger miles divided by the number of available seat miles.

It has nothing at all to do with aerodynamics or aircraft structure...although I guess capacity is related in that a 137 seat aircrat flying 1000 miles will generate 137,000 available seat miles.

It is basically a measurement of airline operating performance.
 
Pilot1113
Posts: 2276
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 1999 1:42 pm

RE: Load Factor!

Mon Sep 27, 1999 9:33 am

At the risk of being wrong, but I do believe that Load Factor does have a double meaning...

1.) Ratio of the Load suppported by the airplane's wings to the actual weight of the aircraft and its contents

2.) Number of Revenue Pax Miles divided by the number of available seat miles.

- Neil Harrison