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sammyk
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Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Sun Jan 02, 2000 12:49 pm

Someone mentioned, I think it was "futurepilot2b" that because an engine is fuselage mounted, that it is impossible to have cascade style thrust reversers. Now what I'd like to know is, how did they manage that on the MD-90? The IAE V2500's on the MD-90 are cascade style. Am i wrong, or is the poster mentioned misinformed?

Sammy
 
NKP S2
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RE: Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Sun Jan 02, 2000 2:55 pm

727-200's had all 3 engines with the clamshell/cascade vane type T/R's. The vanes don't cover the whole diameter of the tailpipe.
 
JETPILOT
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RE: Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Sun Jan 02, 2000 3:01 pm

The IAE V2500 is a bucket type reverser. The 727 has JT8D engines wich are fuselage mounted and have cascade type reversers.
 
OPNLguy
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RE: Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Sun Jan 02, 2000 11:13 pm

Sammyk wrote:
-------------------------------
Someone mentioned, I think it was "futurepilot2b" that because an engine is fuselage mounted, that it is impossible to have cascade style thrust reversers. Now what I'd like to know is, how did they manage that on the MD-90? The IAE V2500's on the MD-90 are cascade style. Am i wrong, or is the poster mentioned misinformed?
_______________________________

Just a guess, but it sounds like he's maybe *assuming* that "fuselage-mounted" means that the engines are somehow "embedded" within the fuselage, or are otherwise "too close" to permit use of that type of reverser. Fuselage-mounted engines are actually connected to the fuselage via a pylon/strut, and it's essentially the same thing as used on a wing-mounted engine, only sideways. Out of a 360 degree (engine) circle, any pylon is only taking up 10-20 degrees worth, and certainly not the fill length of the engine, so there should be plenty of space for cascade reversers...

Just my 2 cents....
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
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sammyk
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RE: Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Sun Jan 02, 2000 11:54 pm

Well, I did some fact finding. What engines are embedded IN the fuselage? I have heard of them being in the wing root, but in the fuselage,? I guess you would be reffering to 727s, and L-1011s, didnt the L-1011 have cascade style reversers? Or was it different on #2? Also, the IAE V2500 DOES NOT have bucket style reversers, they are indeed cascade, and this is how they are on the MD-90 and A32X aircraft. The 727s had reversers on the inside of the nacelle, and nothing "stuck out" like a bucket, or moved backwards like a cascade, at least it was not obviously visible from the outside.

Sammy
 
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RE: Cascade Style T/R On The Fuselage

Mon Jan 03, 2000 2:20 am

Cascade vanes care not how the air is directed toward them. The "moving back" you refer to is translating sleeve that moves rearward relative to the C-duct. (the blocker doors being hinged to both the C-duct and the translating sleeve). The high bypass engines use this method. On the normal 727 JT8 application,the clamshells close pneumatically (13th stage bleed air regulated down to 15 psi) and force all exhaust out the cascade vanes. This is not apparent when viewed from the outside.

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