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KaiGywer
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Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 5:44 am


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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Paulo Carvalho


Anybody heard of the B757 on final to ENJB instead of ENTO? It happened 9/18/00. The pilots of the British registered plane (the one in the picture) were not familiar with the area, and the fact that ENJB was not marked on the Jepp maps, made it easy to misunderstand. ENJB is only 6NM northeast of ENTO, and both airports have 18-36 RWYs. ENTO has a 9347 ft runway and has taken down most kinds of airplanes. ENJB has a 1870 feet runway and is barely used for anything but gliders. Both ATC and the crew noticed that something was wrong, and aborted the landing and headed for ENTO, where they landed without any events. After this, I believe ENJB is included on Jepp maps, and with a warning like the one SK has used for years on their approach maps to ENTO,

”WARNING: Jarlsberg AD 6NM NNE Torp

Do not mistake this AD for Torp”

For those of you that understand Norwegian, the report can be found at
http://www.aaib-n.org/rapporter%202001/rapport%2010-01.htm

For those of you that don't, sorry, but I couldn't find the report in English.

Anybody in here know of other, similar stories?
“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
 
FrequentFlyKid
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 5:46 am

I knew there was a reason Rick switched airlines.

Just kidding, obviously...
 
Coronado990
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 6:21 am

A CO 737-500 landed at an auxiliary Navy Field in Corpus Christi once...

I found this report on the NTSB web-site for more detail....

NTSB Identification: FTW97IA187 . The docket is stored in the (offline) NTSB Imaging System.
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of CONTINENTAL AIRLINES, INC.
Incident occurred Sunday, May 11, 1997 in CORPUS CHRISTI, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 5/4/98
Aircraft: Boeing 737-524, registration: N16618
Injuries: 59 Uninjured.


The flight was issued vectors to intercept the final approach course of Runway 31 at Corpus Christi International Airport, and was cleared for the localizer 31 approach. The first officer was manipulating the controls, the In-Range and Approach checklists were completed, and the approach was briefed. A previous aircraft had requested the ILS RWY 13 approach and the tower controller had switched the ILS localizer from 31 to 13. After the completion of the approach, the tower controller did not reselect the localizer 31 approach. The flightcrew tuned in the localizer for Runway 31; however, they did not identify it by morse code. The captain reported that the localizer for Runway 31 was intercepted, 'although at the very beginning the course deviation bar did a couple of full scale deflections, but locked on 7 miles southeast' of the final approach fix. The aircraft was in and out of a broken cloud layer at 2,000 feet msl and the visibility was about 5 to 6 miles. After verifying all instruments were properly configured for the approach, the captain looked outside and 'saw a runway at the northern edge of the cloud they were in and out of.' The runway also had the number 31 painted on its approach end. The captain reported the field in sight to approach control and he was instructed to contact tower control. Tower cleared the flight to land. The flight landed at Cabaniss Field which is a Navy auxiliary field located 5 nautical miles southeast of Corpus Christi International Airport. Cabaniss is located on the final approach course for Runway 31 to Corpus Christi. The first officer had just completed ground and simulator differences training for the Boeing 737-300/500 series aircraft, and this was the first flight of his initial operating experience (IOE) for differences training in the aircraft. The first officer had never been to Corpus Christi, and it had been three years since the captain had been there.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this incident as follows:

The flightcrew's inadequate in-flight planning and decision, and their failure to refer to the navaids needed for the instrument approach procedure. A factor was the lack of a minimum safe altitude warning from approach control.
Uncle SAN at your service!
 
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KaiGywer
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 6:45 am

Gotta love the NTSB. It is ALWAYS human error in these reports
“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
 
SRD737NG
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 6:50 am

This kind of thing has happened quite a lot actually. I witnessed an American Eagle ATR almost land at the Navy base at Boca Chica next to the Key West airport one night. Lucky we spoke up on the radio to let them know they were on final for the wrong airport before they landed.
 
andersjt
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 6:51 am

Back in the 1970's there was was an incident with Western Airlines. It was a 737-200 flying from Denver to Sheridan, Wyoming. I think, but I cannot remember, that it had an intermediate stop in Casper. Sheridan was the final with an overnight there.

Anyway, it was a night flight, in the winter. When the plane touched down, the captain realized they had landed on the air strip in Buffalo, Wyoming, a smaller town just south of Sheridan. The airline had the passengers bussed to Sheridan, and I'm not sure what happened to the captain or first officer.
Oh how I long for the day when the skies were truly Friendly!
 
Big777jet
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 7:15 am

Delta 737-200 landed wrong airport at Frankfort, Kentucky should be land in Lexington, KY within 30 miles the flight from Louisville, KY about ten years ago. The weather had passed thunderstorm before landed.

Big777jet


 
KLM-MD11
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 7:29 am

how about the story of a Northwest Airlines jet that landed in Brussels, Belgium, the captain thinking it was acually Frankfurt, Germany, it´s orignal destination...

it suposed to have happened quite a few years back, i read about it on pprune, can´t remember the exact details.
GELUK IS GELUL MET EEN K
 
jm017
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 7:50 am

Forgive my ignorance, but what airports are indicated by the designations ENJB and ENTO?
"It's okay to cheat, if you just really don't like to lose."
 
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KaiGywer
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 7:52 am

Jm017
ENJB is Jarlsberg Airport outside Tonsberg, Norway
ENTO is Torp Airport (TRF) outside Sandefjord, Norway

 Smile
“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, an
 
diesel1
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 7:54 am

When flying from LGHR to CWL for maintenance a British Airways 747-400 decended to 1000 ft on approach to St Athan a military airfield a few miles away from CWL..only the ATCOs @ CWL spotted the error and got the BA 747 back on track to the correct airfield.

Spookily, not long afterwards a Swedish airliner (SAS MD87?) almost did the same thing - apparently their airfield charts didnt even show St Athan.

Further back in time a Dan Air HS748 landed at Langford Lodge, a test airfield near BFS.

Also did a USA airline land at Northolt back in the 60s instead of LHR (or was it just an approach?)
I don't like signatures...
 
ssides
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 11:27 pm

I remember the Continental/Corpus Christi incident. However, based on that report, it sounds like it's more the air traffic controller's fault than the pilots'
"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
 
An-225
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Nov 22, 2003 11:45 pm

Didn't a TWA MD-80 land at Steamboat instead of DEN a few years ago? Can anybody confirm?


Alex.
Money does not bring you happiness. But it's better to cry in your own private limo than on a cold bus stop.
 
Big777jet
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Nov 23, 2003 12:08 am

AN-225

No, TWA MD80 supposed to landed to Hayden, Colorado airport but they ended up at Craig airport short of 10 miles from Hayden airport in Steamboat Springs. What a shame!


Big777jet


 
Big777jet
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Nov 23, 2003 12:13 am

Here the link Craig airport and Hayden airport. It's 14 miles apart.

Craig:

http://www.airnav.com/airport/KCAG


Hayden:

http://www.airnav.com/airport/KHDN

Big777jet

 
maiznblu_757
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Tue Nov 25, 2003 5:40 am

The ultimate wrong airport story...

I started a post about this 733 days ago...(When I was Boeing757fan)

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/general_aviation/read.main/644820/6/

Here is another..
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/general_aviation/read.main/342987/6/

"We can smile about it now, but imagine their surprise last Friday when a DC-8 crew discovered they had touched down on a 4,800-by-75-foot runway instead of the 11,800-by-300- foot runway they were expecting. The cargo plane stopped safely with a few hundred feet to spare at Iosco County Airport in East Tawas, Mich., but it was aiming for the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base nine miles to the north, where it was being ferried for maintenance. The DC-8 was towed back onto the runway yesterday morning, and made a successful takeoff with a 10-knot headwind."

http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/news/120800_NW_plane.html

http://www.airnav.com/airport/6D9

http://www.airnav.com/airport/OSC



 
CitationX
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Tue Nov 25, 2003 6:00 am

Back in the early 1980s, a DL 727 landed at McDill AFB instead of TPA.

In the 70's, a National Airlines crew expertly "landed" a 727 into Penscola Bay (at night), thinking they were touching down on one of PNS's runways. Rumor had it that the plane was pulled out of the water, dried out, barged to Miami, refurbished and put back into service.
 
milesrich
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Tue Nov 25, 2003 12:23 pm

A United 727 landed at either Opa Locka or Ft Lauderdale Executive Airport rather than FLL about 20 years ago. The National 727-235 landed in Escambia Bay, off PNS. Ozark landed an FH-227B at Dixon, IL, the boyhood home of Ronald Reagan, rather than at the Whiteside County Airport, SQI. In the Dixon incident, they had to bus the passengers as the runway at Dixon is only about 3000'.
 
Skip7966
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Tue Nov 25, 2003 1:35 pm

I lived in that part of Florida back in the 70's. It was a very stormy night and Eastern had diverted to Mobile instead of trying the approach to PNS. National had just cleared the east side of Escambia Bay when it came down. Witness reports had said they heard what sounded like a jet engine sputtering. The plane came to rest in the mud with the nose and tail sticking out of the water and the landing gear stuck in the mud. You could see it from the I-10 bridge. The newspaper said it was barged to Pensacola Navel Air Station and refurbished. About a week after they got the plane out of the bay, my mom got a letter that was very water damaged and a note attached apologizing for the delay in deliver as it had been on board that plane.
 
Aircanada
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:13 pm

This past summer an AC (I think it was AC, either that or West Jet) jet landed at the wrong airport in British Columbia. It was during the forest fires and apparently very hard to see and the pilot landed at the wrong airport. Maybe someone could give some more details on this.

Andrew.
 
mog
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:39 pm

2nd June 1997, a Saudia Boeing-747 landed at Tambaram Air Force base instead of the Chennai International a few miles away. This made for great noise as well as subsequent television on 4763 foot long secondary runway that the PIC chose.

From the FE:-

http://www.financialexpress.com/ie/daily/19970603/15450453.html

""Airport sources said pilot of the aircraft Captain Khayyat sought visual clearance to land at the Chennai airport after sighting the runway. The Air Traffic Control (ATC) gave him permission to land, but the pilot reported that he had overshot the runway. The ATC instructed the pilot to circle and then come back for landing.

The pilot then went on an orbit and landed at the Tambaram Air Force station airstrip, mistaking it for the Chennai Airport. He then contacted the ATC and told them that he had landed, but they wanted to know where he was as they could not see the aircraft at the Chennai Airport. To their shock, the ATC learnt that the pilot had landed at the Tambaram Air Force station.""

The aircraft had to be stripped completely, bunkered with minimal fuel, and then after all sorts of insurance premiums, waited for the best wind conditions to take off under the command of a specialist pilot from Being, if I recall correctly, he was a very brave Turk.

Tambaram Air Base can be seen clearly from a mountain nearby, which has a church, temple and mosque on top of it. The take-off brought attendance to record highs, and the aircraft landed successfully at Chennai.

Just a few weeks later, though.
 
PVD757
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Thu Dec 04, 2003 11:49 pm

Pardon the lack of dates and specifics, but I know that there have been numerous approaches made, with 1 or 2 actual landing at Quonset Airport (OQU), in North Kingstown, RI (located 7 dme south of PVD) by aircraft (commercial) on approach to runway 34 at PVD. OQU also has a 8000 ft (now 7500) runway 16-34. The incident I read about was a 727-200 (American or Eastern I believe) that actually landed there in the late 70's/early 80's. After the aircraft landed there, they had to bus the passengers to PVD, the flight was cancelled, and the aircraft ferried out. Quonset Airport is an old Navy base, now used by corp jets, ANG C130's, and Army Guard Huey's and Backhawks.
 
KYIPpilot
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Thu Dec 04, 2003 11:56 pm

I have heard that airliners with pilots unfamiliar with the area bound for DTW have accidentally intercepted the approach for KYIP, which is only 7 miles West of DTW. They have realized their mistake before landing though. DTW uses the 21's and the 22's; KYIP has the 23's, so it isn't that hard to believe.

Wasn't there an Air Canada A-320 that almost landed at a small airport in BC this past summer? I think smoke from a forrest fire made it difficult to see.
"It starts when you're always afraid; You step out of line, the man come and take you away" -Buffalo Springfield
 
FlySSC
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 1:00 am

In the 80's an Air France B707 operating a charter flight from Paris to Eilat landed by mistake at Acqaba Airport in Jordan, just a few miles away... Sad
 
sjoic
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 1:39 am

If memory serves me right on that 737 in Wyoming, they had to take all the seats out, and use minimal fuel just to get the thing off the runway to go back to it original destination....Jeff
 
Tennisace
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 2:06 am

Aircanada:

It was an AC airbus enroute from Toronto to Kelowna. Was on a visual approach from the north and accidentally started to approach a smaller airport between it and CYLW. It didn't actually land, but it was observed on short final with gear down before 'going around'. The strip is about 4000' I think.
Thick smoke in the area may have been a factor. And perhaps the Toronto based(?) flight crew were not very familiar with the local area.
Oops!
 
teva
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 2:38 am

Back in the 80s, a Turkish aircraft landed in Bretigny/Orge (Militaray and testing airstrip) instead of Orly, a few miles away...
Teva
Ecoute les orgues, Elles jouent pour toi...C'est le requiem pour un con
 
elwood64151
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 2:42 am

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the most famous "wrong airport" landing:

From http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Explorers_Record_Setters_and_Daredevils/corrigan/EX16.htm

Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan
Douglas Corrigan became a legendary aviator, not because of his accomplishments as a pilot but rather because of a supposed navigational error. In 1938, Corrigan "mistakenly" flew from New York to Ireland--when he was supposed to be flying from New York to California--because he seemingly misread his compass. For Americans, who were caught in the midst of the Great Depression, Corrigan's antic provided a great deal of humor and uplift and he became a national folk hero. To this day, Corrigan's nickname, "'Wrong Way' Corrigan," remains a stock colloquial phrase in popular culture. People use it to describe anyone who blunders and goes the wrong way, particularly in sporting events. Nevertheless, as much fun as Corrigan's incident provides, many people do not understand all the complexities of his story, nor do they appreciate the fact that he was a sound and accomplished pilot.

Corrigan was born in Galveston, Texas, on January 22, 1907. His father was a construction engineer and his mother a teacher. When Douglas was 15 months old, he was already making a name for himself; he won first prize in a local baby contest. Corrigan's father moved his family around fairly often during Douglas's childhood. Eventually, Corrigan's parents divorced and Douglas bounced from one parent to another before he settled in Los Angeles with his mother. There, he began working in the construction industry. At the time, aviation did not seem to be in his future.

Then, on a Sunday afternoon in October 1925, Douglas decided to visit a local airfield. Corrigan watched a pilot take passengers for rides in a Curtiss "Jenny" biplane. Excited at the prospect of taking his own ride, he returned the next Sunday with $2.50 in hand and persuaded the pilot to take him aloft. Flying over Los Angeles that afternoon, Corrigan was hooked; he was determined to learn to fly. The following Sunday, he returned for his first flying lesson and continued for weeks thereafter. Corrigan also spent time learning everything he could from the field's aircraft mechanics. On March 25, 1926, Corrigan made his first solo flight.

Notably, Corrigan took flight lessons at the airfield where B.P. Mahoney and T.C. Ryan, a team of well-known aircraft manufacturers, were operating a small airline. It was not long before Corrigan got a job with the two men and started working in their San Diego factory.

Shortly after Corrigan began working for Mahoney and Ryan, a new customer approached them about making a special aircraft. Charles Lindbergh wanted them to design and build the Spirit of St. Louis. Corrigan assembled the aircraft's wing and installed its gas tanks and instrument panel.

When Lindbergh made his famous transatlantic flight in May 1927, Corrigan and his coworkers were thrilled, but Corrigan's excitement did not stop there. Inspired by Lindbergh's trip, he decided that he would make his own transatlantic flight someday. Being of Irish decent, he selected Ireland as his destination.

Starting in the late 1920s, Corrigan changed jobs several times. In October 1929, he became a full-fledged pilot when he earned his transport pilot's license. The following year, he moved to the East Coast and began a small passenger-carrying service with a friend named Steve Reich. The two men would land in small towns and convince people to buy airplane rides. Although the operation did fairly well financially, Corrigan eventually grew restless and decided to return to the West Coast. In 1933, he bought a used OX5 Robin monoplane to make the trip home. Back in California, Corrigan returned to work as an aircraft mechanic. During that period, he also began to modify his Robin for a transatlantic flight.

In 1935, Corrigan applied to the federal government for permission to make a non-stop flight from New York to Ireland. Officials denied his application, however, because they claimed that his plane was not sound enough to make a non-stop transatlantic trip. Nevertheless, they did certify it for cross-country journeys. In an attempt to get full certification, Corrigan made several modifications to his aircraft over the next two years, but each time he reapplied for permission, officials turned him down.

By 1937, Corrigan had grown tired of "red tape" and decided to try the flight without official sanction (although he never publicly acknowledged such a decision during his lifetime). His plan was to land in New York late at night, after airport officials had already left for the day, fill his gas tanks, and then leave for Ireland. But various mechanical problems while in route to New York caused him to lose his "safe weather window" over the Atlantic, and Corrigan decided not to risk the flight just then. He returned to California to wait for another opportunity the next year.

On July 8, 1938, Corrigan left California for New York. His official flight plan called for him to return to California, and on July 17, Corrigan took off from Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn, New York. He took off in thick fog and headed east because airport officials had told him to lift off in any direction except west since there were some buildings at the western edge of the field. They fully believed Corrigan would turn his plane around and head west toward California once he cleared the airport's airspace. To everyone's surprise, he kept flying eastward. Corrigan insisted that his visibility was so poor that he could only fly by using his compass and claimed his compass indicated he was heading west.

Approximately 26 hours into his flight, Corrigan claimed to have finally dropped down out of the clouds and noticed that he was over a large body of water. Knowing that it was too early to have reached the Pacific Ocean, Corrigan looked down at his compass--and because there was now supposedly more light to see by--suddenly noticed he "had been following the wrong end of the magnetic needle." Within a short time, Corrigan was over Ireland. He landed at Baldonnel Airport, in Dublin, after a 28-hour, 13-minute flight.

When officials questioned Corrigan about the incident, he explained that he had left New York en route to California but had then gotten mixed up in the clouds and flown the wrong way. He also explained about the fog and his mistake with the compass, but they did not believe him. As authorities continued to press him for "the truth," Corrigan finally ended the situation by replying: "That's my story." After failing to sway him from his explanation, officials released Corrigan. The only punishment he received was a brief suspension of his pilot's license, which lasted only until August 4, the day he returned to New York via steamship.

Corrigan returned to the United States a hero. People loved his audacity and spirit. They also had a great deal of fun with the obvious humor of his situation. The New York Post, for example, printed a front-page headline--"Hail to Wrong Way Corrigan!"--backwards. Corrigan also received a Broadway ticker-tape parade with more than a million people lining the street, more people than had turned out to honor Charles Lindbergh after his transatlantic flight.

Corrigan lived a fairly simple life after his famous flight. In the 1950s, he bought an orange grove in Santa Ana, California, and lived there for the remainder of his life. During the 50th anniversary of his flight, some newspapers began reporting that he was going to admit to having flown to Ireland intentionally, but he never publicly acknowledged that fact. Corrigan died on December 9, 1995.

Although Corrigan never admitted that his story was a ruse, most people believe that he purposely set out to bypass authorities and accomplish his dream of a transatlantic flight. Despite the humor that his story has provided, it is worth noting that Corrigan flew across the Atlantic during the early years of transoceanic flights, something that only the bravest and best aviators of the day attempted. Corrigan deserves recognition for such a daring achievement, even though he had to accomplish the task in such an unorthodox manner.

--David H. Onkst

Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.
 
Vimanav
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Fri Dec 05, 2003 3:00 am

A JL DC-8 (JA8013) landed at Juhu Airport runway 08 instead of BOM runway 09 in deteriorating visibility on 24SEP72. The aircraft was a write off. This was the second JL DC-8 to be lost in India in two months with one having crashed in JUN that year near DEL.

rgds//Vimanav
Sarfaroshi kii tamannaa ab hamaare dil mein hai, Dekhnaa hai zor kitnaa baazu-e-qaatil mein hai
 
Airbust
Posts: 44
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 2:59 pm

I'm surprised at how often this happens. I seem to remember reading about an AA MD-80 landing at a miliatary base in Omaha instead of OMA, about 7 or 8 years ago. Anyone else hear of this?
 
Danny
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 3:02 pm

Last year ATR 42 Eurolot instead of International airport in Kaliningrad (Russia) landed in military airbase. Pilots and aircraft were arrested and kept for a few days.
 
airlinelover
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Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2001 8:03 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 4:39 pm

"We can smile about it now, but imagine their surprise last Friday when a DC-8 crew discovered they had touched down on a 4,800-by-75-foot runway instead of the 11,800-by-300- foot runway they were expecting. The cargo plane stopped safely with a few hundred feet to spare at Iosco County Airport in East Tawas, Mich., but it was aiming for the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base nine miles to the north, where it was being ferried for maintenance. The DC-8 was towed back onto the runway yesterday morning, and made a successful takeoff with a 10-knot headwind."

I remember something similar, but with an AA or UA 757..

Chris
Lets do some sexy math. We add you, subtract your clothes, divide your legs and multiply
 
Guest

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 4:41 pm

An NW DC-10 flying DTW-FRA landed in BRU instead in the late 1990s... the pilots didn't know, but the passengers watching the compass did  Smile.
 
Ex NWA
Posts: 116
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2000 4:12 pm

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 5:41 pm

It happened to Piedmont twice in the 80's. A 737-200 landed at the wrong airport in Augusta, GA (the airport it mistakenly landed at has since been closed) and also either a 737 or F28 landed at Albert J.Ellis in Jacksonville, NC instead of its correct destination of Wilmington, NC.
 
PiedmontGirl
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sat Dec 06, 2003 11:51 pm

Elwood64151:

Thanks for the info about Corrigan.
 
CROOKS44
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Dec 07, 2003 5:34 am

Didn't a LAX bound 747 come close to landing at tiny Hawthorne airport years ago?
 
Big777jet
Posts: 2682
Joined: Mon May 01, 2000 10:52 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Dec 07, 2003 6:10 am

I remembered that. I was working at company. A guy told me that he heard the news that TWA 747 flew from London to Chicago. TWA 747 was flying really low attitude towards to Glenview NAS airfield (now closed). O'Hare tower told TWA 747 to climb up you have wrong airport you are heading 10 miles away from O'Hare. Captain said opps and alright thanks for the warning. It happened about 15-18 years ago I think.


Big777jet


 
fflood
Posts: 38
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Dec 07, 2003 7:55 pm

When I lived in Tampa, every once in a while an airliner would mistakenly land at McDill AFB instead of TPA. Needless to say, what an embarrassment!
LINE UP AND WAIT
 
united4ever
Posts: 287
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2003 8:34 pm

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Dec 07, 2003 8:04 pm

There is a european airline that routinely lands flights at a different place to the one it has advertised to its customers...

Mike
 
BillElliott9
Posts: 237
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Sun Dec 07, 2003 11:28 pm

I think A CO 737 landed on a taxiway in Houston.....As I recall Lorenzo was on board the a/c.
You can fight without ever winning but never really win without a fight.
 
DB777
Posts: 864
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 12:20 am

For those who mentioned it, the Air Force base just south of the city of Tampa is spelled as MacDill, not McDill.

The United 727 that landed at Opa-locka instead of MIA was about 30 years ago, not 20. Eastern had done it previously to set a precedent. Both were done on clear moon over Miami nights while they were on visual approaches.

Don
Photographing aircraft since the Earth was flat and on Airliners.net since #338
 
jhooper
Posts: 5560
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2001 8:27 pm

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 4:24 am

The tower controllers at College Station, TX tell me that occasionally they'll see an American Eagle flight line up for Coulter Field instead of CLL.
Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
 
usair320
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 9:51 am

klm-md11, how the hell did that pilot think BRU was FRA????!!!!!!!
 
koopas
Posts: 168
Joined: Sat Oct 16, 1999 5:18 pm

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 10:09 am

Hey Jhooper!

How's it going down there in Texas? Did you graduate from A&M?

Regarding the post, it wouldn't surprise me if pilots lined up for that other big abandoned airport near Caldwell (I forget the name though)

Alex

 
User avatar
LN-MOW
Posts: 1688
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2000 12:24 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 10:52 am

".....how the hell did that pilot think BRU was FRA????!!!!!!!"

If I remember right, it was the flight plan that was wrong ... This also happened once in a while in Oslo, where rare visitors sometimes filed flight plans to Fornebu (FBU/ENFB) instead of Gardermoen (GEN/ENGM). All charter flights were required to operate to GEN, but some had to be redirected.

I'm surprised noone have mentioned the famous error by Spantax who were inaugerating Coronado charter service into Hamburg by landing at the wrong airport with a bunch of distinguished guests on board ....

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cancidas
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RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 11:09 am

i never mixed up airports but did mix up runways. instead of reporting 5 miles out to runway 1 i reported to runway 32. i was having electrical trouble that day and was a little preocupied in the cockpit.
"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
 
delta-flyer
Posts: 2631
Joined: Mon Jul 30, 2001 9:47 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 11:24 am

When I was living in Montreal, 30+ years ago, an LH 707 landed at Cartierville airport runway 24 instead of YUL 24L. The Cartierville airport has since been closed, as its rwy 24 is just about 3 miles from YUL's and almost in perfect alignment with it.

In the mid-80's, now living in Mississippi, I was working in my yard one evening when I heard a loud roar of a jet taking off from a small GA airport about a mile away. I was just thinking to myself how unusually noisy this little bizjet was -- like a 727.

Well, it turned out to be a 727 all right - an AA flight from DFW almost landed at Madison's rwy 17 instead of Jackson's 16. Luckily, the pilot realized the error, and spooled up. Lucky because Madison's runway is only 3000 x 75 feet.

Pete
"In God we trust, everyone else bring data"
 
danialanwar
Posts: 420
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2001 6:13 pm

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 12:24 pm

I recall two stories ... believe they came from credible sources:

Swissair @ Paris
This happened long ago in the prop age ... the pilot and the guy in charge of communications were quarelling on a flight into Paris and the pilot told the other guy to shut-up unless he asks. The comm guy obeyed. Pilot landed at the wrong airport in Paris and once he realise he told the comm guy to inform HQ that they'll be late ... his reply was: "done that 20 minutes ago".

Airliner from South America
One of the lesser known airlines (maybe from Paraguay or so, I dont recall) was meant to fly into Dakar / Senegal on a flight to Europe. They ended up in another country, and they had no credit arrangements for fuel there. So apparently they asked some of their First Class passengers for small change ...

A bit off-topic: Pax Got It Wrong
Wasnt there a couple who wanted to fly from London to Sydney ... they did, to Sydney / Canada instead of Sydney / Australia ...
Best Business Class: Royal Brunei. Best Economy: Singapore Airlines. First: please send money first!
 
G-KIRAN
Posts: 710
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2000 1:55 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 3:26 pm

I remember reading in some airline magazine that when Milan Malpensa was opened many major european carriers refused to fly there, instead they prefered to remain at Linate. However in the end they had to. The first LH flight into MXP decided instead to land at Linate on purpose, however the pilot was instead made to land at MXP. Rather original I think.
 
j_hallgren
Posts: 1427
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2000 11:48 am

RE: Flying To The Wrong Airport

Mon Dec 08, 2003 4:53 pm

I was flying Delta from Boston to Tampa the day after that mistake landing at MacDill happened...I asked agent "Do the know the way to TIA?"...they were not amused...but the crew on that error flight said on news they knew something was wrong when the guards with M-16's showed up to "greet" the flight! Nowadays, you wouldn't dare try landing there! Since it's now home to CentCom...
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