captaink
Posts: 3987
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 10:43 am

What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:55 am

I was looking at the post on Rich Int'l and realized that their code was JN. Presently Excel Airways two letter code is JN. When an airline goes under can another airline take their two letter code and ticket stock number?
There is something special about planes....
 
planemannyc
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 12:54 am

RE: What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:02 am

Captaink,

I believe the 2-letter codes are registered with the IATA and IATA has the right to assign the 2-letter code to a new carrier when a carrier using the code becomes defunct. Because of a boom in airlines, over the past decade, the 2-letter code has been expanded to include a letter-number combination (hence JetBlue is B6)

ICAO assigns a three letter code (British Airways is BA for IATA code, BAW for ICAO). It reserves the right to withdraw the code from an airline should that airline go out of business or withdraw from ICAO membership (I wonder if any ever does).

As for stock symbol, that is guided by the exchange that trades the shares of the stock of a company, and the stock symbol may be regenerated as well at the discretion of the stock exchange. However, like the ICAO 3-letter codes, the permutation possibilities are so great, one finds such regeneration as a rarity than the norm.

 
toltommy
Posts: 2482
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2003 9:04 am

RE: What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:23 am

planemannyc -

Captain K is reffering to ticket stock, not stock as in ownership. For example, AA's code for ticket stock is 001, CO is 005, HP is 401, FL is 332, etc... You see those numbers at the beginning of any ticket number issued by that carrier or its representative (travel agents).

I think the two letter/three letter codes that refer to flight numbers can be reused, as you noted in the case of JN. It would surprise me if the 3 digit ticket stock codes get reused, as those numbers create accountable documents. That's probably why newer carriers like FL have such high numbers.
 
planemannyc
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 12:54 am

RE: What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:41 am

TOLtommy,

My Bad!! Thanks for clarifying!
 
Sabena332
Posts: 14938
Joined: Wed May 09, 2001 3:57 am

RE: What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:49 am

When an airline goes under can another airline take their two letter code and ticket stock number?

It is even possible to change the two letter code between two airlines which are still in business, Eurowings' old two letter code was NS, a letter combination which isn't very popular in Germany, Eurowings exchanged it with an airline from New Zealand, so they got EW and the airline from New Zealand got NS. I am not sure about the ticket stock number, I think EW always had 104.

Patrick
NZ1's mother is a disgusting crack-whore and his father is a worthless alcoholic!
 
captaink
Posts: 3987
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 10:43 am

RE: What Becomes Of An Airline's Two Letter Code?

Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:55 am

Thanks for you help guys. I think too that the ticket stock number might not be reused. I see that airlines such as Eastern and TWA numbers are sitll in the system, when you decode the airlines two letter code.
There is something special about planes....

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