jerion
Posts: 230
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:59 am

Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:32 am

On a 762 there are four door exits and two window exits (one over each wing). The same applies to the 737-100/200/300/500/600/700 and Airbus 318/319 jets. It seems with the additional seats/pax; the 762 should have maybe four window exits (two over each wing).

Is there a rule to how many exits are required per number of seats on the aircraft? If so, anyone know what that is.

From A.net

767-200:

Typical two class seating for 18 premium and 198 economy class pax. Max seating for 290 at eight abreast and 76cm (30in) pitch.


While I think eight abreast seating on 767 is rare (charters only?), I think I'd hate to have an emergency evacuation on a max configured 762!

Jer(emy)

[Edited 2004-06-16 21:34:45]
L10/D9S/D10/M80/M88/732/733/734/735/73G/738/72S/757/762/763/320/319/318/ERJ
 
WidgetBoi
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:38 am

While I'm not sure of the regulations that exist regarding emergency exits, I do know that some charter companies have equipped their 762s with an extra window exit over each wing.


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jeremy
 
jerion
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:40 am

I didn't realize some 762's had two over-wing emergency exits.
Thanks, Jeremy.

Jer(emy)
L10/D9S/D10/M80/M88/732/733/734/735/73G/738/72S/757/762/763/320/319/318/ERJ
 
Sammyhostie
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:40 am

The rule is (minimum) one exit to every 50 passengers, and this is also the legal crew complement.

However obviously with Overwing exits this minimum is always exceeded.

Safety is never compromised.

Indeed if even one door is considered to be in-operative and un-servicable, a minimum of 50 passengers are offloaded by the Captain.
That in-op door would then be taped up, the crew member removed from the door, and the emergency exits signs above that door taped up to disable it as a visible exit.
The door would also be ommitted from the safety demo.


Hope this helps!


 
kevi747
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:42 am

The 767 door exits are large and equiped with double-lane evacuation slides, so 2 people can jump out at the same time, thereby doubling their effectiveness.
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Jetmek319
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 5:39 am

EasyJet's A319's also have two e-doors over each wing. Special order.
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cessnalady
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 5:49 am

I hope not to be far-off topic, but I recently noticed a sharp cold air draft entering from an AA MD80 right wing emergency exit. I was seating in 20-something E seat. In our little Cessna, it is somewhat normal that external air finds a way into the cabin... But this was too muchand too cold for being normal.

I called the attention of an F/A, and she grumbled back saying if I didn't like the cold, I could change seats.

Marie.
 
henpol747
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 5:52 am

50 passengers per emergency exit minimum? well then the MD 80 is pretty well equipped!! 8 emergency exits

Cheers,

Henpol747
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roseflyer
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 6:25 am

Another test for exits that is mandated by the FAA is that all passengers in a max configuration must be able to exit the airplane in 90 seconds or less using only half of the exits.

I remember when a full scale trial was done with the original 777. They tested it in a hanger and 429 of the 430 (I believe that is the correct number, correct me if I am wrong) passengers got out in under 90 seconds, and therefore the original 777-200 was certified for 429 passengers. I am sure they did this with the 762 as well, and it succeeded. The twin aisles of the 767 rapidly increase the pace of an evacuation and allows for fewer exits.
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Crosswind
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:38 am

There is no "1 exit for every 50 passengers" requirement in certifying aircraft for evacuation purposes.

They are bound by the distance between exits, the ability to evacuate all passengers with half the exits inoperative in 90 seconds and finally physical space, ie how many seats can you actually fit in the cabin?

The number of exits isn't really as important as their type, double width doors can obviouly allow a much higher number of passengers to evacuate than an overwing exit.
Types A/B/C are main cabin doors
(A is a double-wide, double-slide door, B is single-width, double-slide, C is single-width, single-slide)
Type I, II or III are emergency exits
They range from Type I, found on the 757 at door 3, to type III, a standard overwing-exit.

Where loads are reduced due to inoperative exits, the MEL for each aircraft type will determine how many passengers can leaglly be carried, dependant on the type/location of the inoperative exit.

There is a 1 cabin crew member for 50 seats (not passengers) requirement, but for some aircraft types there are further restrictions applied. For example British Airways' low-density 767-300s have only 193 seats, however the UK CAA have imposed a minimum crew complement of 7 on the type due to it's size. Obviously for a charter airline like MyTravel with 326 seats in the 767-300, the CAA and 1 cabin crew member for 50 seats rule give the same minimum crew complement anyway.

The maximum capacities for all UK-registered aircraft, along with a lot of other certification data, can be found on the CAA Aircraft Type Certificate Data Sheets page.

Regards
CROSSWIND
 
VirginFlyer
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:17 am

As stated above, the number of exits depends on the size of the exits. For example, even though both the 737-800 and 767-300 have 4 passenger doors and 4 overwing hatches, the 767 can carry more people, because it has larger doors.

For a specific definition, the best resource is the Federal Aviation Regulations Part 25, specifically:

25.803
25.807
25.809
25.810
25.811
25.812
25.813

That should explain pretty much everything you need to know about emergency exits, I think. A full list of FARs, which govern pretty much everything, can be found here.

I hope this is useful,

V/F
"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
 
Horus
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:20 am

Easyjet's new A319s are packed with the maximum 150 seats so they have an extra set of emergency exits over the wings.
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SlamClick
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:41 am

CessnaLady the draft you were feeling in the MD-80 had to have been from the air conditioning ducts. An air leak in a pressurized airplane leaks air OUT OF the cabin, not into it. The pressure in the cabin was probably in the neighborhood of 8 pounds per square inch higher than the atmospheric pressure outside.


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777gk
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:26 am

For all intents and purposes, the 767-200 has a total of 10 emergency exits. Each door is double-wide with a dual-lane slide, allowing the simultaneous egress of two passengers, and two overwing exits, one on each wing, with dual-lane weighted ramp slides off the trailing edge.

The 767-200 as I recall fell well within the FAA regulations as far as emergency evac (all pax down the slides inside 90 seconds with half of the exits randomly disabled), and when you consider that in the Continental configuration, the 767-224/ER seats less than our standard 757-224 configuration but has the same number of "lanes" for evacuation, I would not feel unsafe about flying on a 762 at all.
 
jerion
Posts: 230
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:42 am

For all intents and purposes, the 767-200 has a total of 10 emergency exits. Each door is double-wide with a dual-lane slide, allowing the simultaneous egress of two passengers, and two overwing exits, one on each wing, with dual-lane weighted ramp slides off the trailing edge.

The 767-200 as I recall fell well within the FAA regulations as far as emergency evac (all pax down the slides inside 90 seconds with half of the exits randomly disabled), and when you consider that in the Continental configuration, the 767-224/ER seats less than our standard 757-224 configuration but has the same number of "lanes" for evacuation, I would not feel unsafe about flying on a 762 at all.


777gk:

I had no idea about double-wide doors, dual lane e-slides, regulations, etc. Now that I do, it all make sense.

Thanks.
 Smile

Jer(emy)
L10/D9S/D10/M80/M88/732/733/734/735/73G/738/72S/757/762/763/320/319/318/ERJ
 
aa757first
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:17 pm

The door would also be ommitted from the safety demo.

I guess that means a live demo must be performed? Or can they play the recorded video and then announce at the end "Ladies and gentlemen, 2R is not functioning" or something similar?

AAndrew
 
Sammyhostie
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RE: Emergency Exits On Aircraft.

Thu Jun 17, 2004 4:30 pm

Yes Aa757,

In the event of any door being inop, a manual demo would have to be performed excluding the door as an exit and an additional PA made just to confirm this to passengers.

The emergency lighting to the door is alsocompletely covered, including the low level lighting on the floor.

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