OB1504
Topic Author
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 10:23 am

On right now on the National Gerographic Channel (DirecTV Channel 0276) is a documentary about the incident aboard British Airways flight 5390 from BHX to AGP where the captain was sucked out of the cockpit and pinned to the outside of the 'plane after the windshield seperated from the aircraft. Half of it is over now, but they'll be replaying it later today at 23:00 EDT. Watch it, it's pretty interesting!


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whitehatter
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 10:29 am

Not seen that, but I'm familiar with the incident.

Did they show the reason for it? Namely that the wrong size bolts were used on the screen?

The Captain was one hell of a guy to hang on to those tiny aerials for so long, and total kudos to the FO for some brilliant airmanship in losing height and landing it so quickly.
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yooyoo
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:00 am

I must have been sleeping...

I will admit, i have never heard of that story.

Anybody have some links?

Appreciated

Andreas  Big thumbs up
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CougarAviator
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:10 am

Wholly molly!!!!!! Again, any links to the story, or can someone give a report on the show?!

Damn I need the National Geographic Channel!!!!!!!!
Failure is not an option.....
 
PNEPilot
Posts: 148
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:45 pm

There's a report on the incident in post #13 of this thread:

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/81279/

Full Air Accident Investigation Branch report is here:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/stellent/groups/dft_avsafety/documents/page/dft_avsafety_502702.hcsp

The show repeats on Sunday at 1pm and next Thursday at 3pm (Eastern Time)

[Edited 2004-11-05 07:48:58]
 
wjcandee
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:50 pm

I think there was a Readers Digest article on it a few years ago. "Drama in Real Life". They also did a great treatment of the FedEx hijacking and bludgeoning of the flight crew a few years back...

Read them when visiting my parents, so I don't remember what year. Really well done.

Best,

Bill
 
IndianFlyboy
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 5:06 pm

Like wjcandee said , the reader's digest article on this was excellent as their other articles on aviation. The others which immediately comes to mind are of a KLM 747 which managed to suck in volcanic ash similar to the BA incident and the SAS incident where both engines failed because if ice ingestion.

Whitehatter ,

The Capt was half outside the aircraft , with his legs being held on to by 2 stewards , while the FO flew the plane down.

Still have not figured out, with so many quality processes in place how the hell did someone manage to put in the bolts of a wrong size and that too in an aircraft ...


Regards
 
diesel1
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 7:24 pm

Indian Flyboy

Have a look at the accident report link in PNEpilot's link above - in the causal factors and findings it'll show that there just weren't the quality processes in place to stop such an incident happening.
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spacecadet
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:19 pm

I'm something of an accident buff (I know, strange "hobby"), but I admit I'd never heard of this incident before. Probably because it happened in the UK and did not involve fatalities. That's probably part of the reason why the producers decided to feature it, though - the pilot's survival became something of a "twist" in the show. It seemed impossible that he would have survived (and they even referred to "the pilot's body" several times), and they didn't say he had survived until about halfway into the show, as the two flight attendants were reunited with "another crew member who lived through that day".

Really interesting episode of Air Emergency, though I'd thought pretty morbid up until the time they revealed the pilot was alive. Just amazing that he survived that. Lots of heroes that day.

Did they show the reason for it? Namely that the wrong size bolts were used on the screen?

Yes they did. This show always does a good job of dealing with the causes of the incidents/accidents they present. They obviously understand the investigative processes involved as well as aviation in general, and present it in an interesting way. They talked about the bolts, why the engineer used the ones he did, and they talked about the human factors involved in his decision-making too, noting that human factor studies were basically pioneered in this investigation.

I really recommend this series to anyone who can see it. First of all, they select really interesting incidents - not always the most deadly, but interesting ones like this. Then they present sometimes harrowingly realistic and well-produced re-enactments using realistic looking interiors and ultra-high quality CGI exterior graphics (they really are very well done; they even had the pilot's hands flopping around in the wind for this incident). And lastly, they present the causes, again using realistic re-enactments of the events leading up to the accident, always with a good understanding of the documentation they're basing the show on, and usually interviewing the actual investigators involved. It's a really well-produced show. The narrator they have occasionally sounds a little too happy for the material he's narrating, but still, I try to never miss this series (I've got it as a season pass on my TiVo).
I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
 
KateAA
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:55 pm

I remember this!

It was shocking that something like this could happen and it was amazing that the cabin crew could keep a hold for so long!

Is it possible that some pilots would even fit out the window anymore!? lol...

As for the BAc 1-11 being called the 'jeep of the sky', well if you have ever flown on one you will know what they mean! I have been on a few in my time and let me tell you, it would have taken more then a broken window to stop on of those birds from flying!

Kate
 
Santhosh
Posts: 543
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 1:31 am

Documentary on this incident was shown several times on TV in different channels. The captain was sucked partially out of the aircraft and he suffered severe frostbit due to sub zero temperatures at high altitude. However he lived to tell the tale.
Happy Landings :)
 
IGUY
Posts: 27
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 5:31 am

FO did a great job. The program said that the captains legs were pushing yoke forward and the cabin door had jammed the throttles forward.
 
BR715-A1-30
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 5:47 am

So far, I've seen the ASA 529 Accident Episode, The AeroPeru 603 Episode, and the Alaska Airlines 261 Episode. All VERY Interesting..
Puhdiddle
 
sacflyer
Posts: 364
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 7:05 am

The official report, linked above, says that the aircraft pitched 60 degrees nose down and rolled 250 degrees to the right. Is that a typo? That would be one hell of a ride.

I am also not sure, but I am having trouble understanding the Captain's body position outside the aircraft. The only mention is the report is that the captain had the impression that he was laying on his back on the upper portion of the flight deck. When I first heard of this incident I pictured the captain laying on the nose of the aircraft, but I guess that would be impossible with the air pressure. I guess he is lucky that he didn't break his back or both his legs if he was being bent backwards with his feet and lower legs still in the cockpit.

Here is a fascinating web site of a similar incident happening to the Bombardier/Navigator of a Navy A-6 when his ejection seat mount broke breaking the canopy.

http://www.gallagher.com/ejection_seat/
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Evolution
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 8:36 am

Sacflyer

I remember speaking to some passengers who were on that BHX-AGP flight. They spoke of the door to the flight deck flying open and all the loose articles (papers, drinks etc) being sucked forward ‘like a vacuum cleaner’.

Coincidently, a work colleague at the time was a best friend with the girl who worked for the suppliers of the replacement bolts. In fact she was the person who took the actual order. After the various investigations that followed, she was absolved of any blame. The upshot of the investigation, as I remember it, was the maintenance people at BA put the wrong bolts (different aircraft type) into the windscreen.
 
tbanger
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 9:48 am

Imagine the pilot trying to breath...It would be like trying to drink from a fire hose.  Wow!
 
spacecadet
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:57 pm

I am also not sure, but I am having trouble understanding the Captain's body position outside the aircraft. The only mention is the report is that the captain had the impression that he was laying on his back on the upper portion of the flight deck. When I first heard of this incident I pictured the captain laying on the nose of the aircraft, but I guess that would be impossible with the air pressure. I guess he is lucky that he didn't break his back or both his legs if he was being bent backwards with his feet and lower legs still in the cockpit.

He was laying basically on the "roof" of the flight deck, not the nose. This is the way it was portrayed in CGI in the show, and also described in the show. Given that they had the participation of the investigators, the flight attendants and the pilot in question himself, I'm guessing the show probably had it right.

He was sucked straight up and out, from his seat into the direction of the windscreen directly in front of him, then he was bent backward by the force of the wind before he was fully outside of the aircraft. It looked like his legs actually got caught on the control column as he went out (they said in the show that his legs were "wedged against" the control column, but didn't specifically say it's what stopped him from fully exiting the aircraft). He said towards the end of the show that he couldn't breathe initially because he was facing directly into the wind. He said he then turned his head around backwards and could breathe that way - then he blacked out from the cold. He said he could see the top of the fuselage, the tail, the engines, etc. when he turned around. His shirt was ripped off by the wind, so he was half-naked out there in the 0 degree F temperatures with 300 knot winds blowing at him.

They said when the plane slowed a bit he slid down from the top of the fuselage to the side, still bent backwards. The flight attendant who was holding onto him said he could see his face at this point through the remaining windshield and his eyes were wide open - he assumed he was dead and they almost let him go at that point. I'm sure he was unconscious (he said he remembered nothing after blacking out until he awoke in the ambulance) but the wind had just kept his eyelids open. His face, hands and arms were completely bloodied, probably from being repeatedly slammed against the airplane in the wind.

The description sounds completely morbid until you realize the guy is totally fine now, still flies, and is perfectly happy to talk about his ordeal. In fact it seemed like the flight attendant who was holding onto him was a lot more traumatized by recalling the situation than the pilot was (I can understand that in a way; the pilot was unconscious the whole time, but the F/A had to see some pretty horrible things, or so he would have thought at the time).
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User avatar
Ryan h
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"Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 9:23 pm

Although Air Emergency is not shown here in Australia, but I have heard of the incident.

At the moment we have an air crash series called air crash investigation. Our series is a six part series. I can't remember what the very first part was, but we have had one about Aeroperu 603, Alaska 261 and Swissair 111.
South Australian Spotter www.ryanhothersall.net
 
VC-10
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RE: "Air Emergency" - Speedbirde 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 10:05 pm

a work colleague at the time was a best friend with the girl who worked for the suppliers of the replacement bolts. In fact she was the person who took the actual order

BA order thousands of AGS items. The bolts weren't issued from stores but were generally accessable from a bin in the hanger. How could she know she took the actual order for that particular batch of bolts? If it was identified that the wrong p/n of bolt was used why would the AIB contact the supplier?
 
Santhosh
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RE: "Air Emergency" TV Program - Speedbird 5390

Sat Nov 06, 2004 10:50 pm

Ryan h The Air Crash Investigation Series is also shown in India in NatGeo on Sunday's 2100 local time. So fat they have shown six incidents. They are as follows:


1:Aeroperu 603 -Flying Blind
2:Air Transat 236 -Flying Empty
3:American Airlines 1420 -Racing The Storm
4:United Airlines 811 -Unlocking Disaster
5:Swissair 111 -Fire Onboard
6:Alaska Air 261 -Vertical Dive


Regards,
George
Happy Landings :)

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