gregviperrt
Posts: 71
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 12:17 pm

Concorde Air Worthiness

Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:43 pm

What are the chances someone might want to buy a Concorde and resume flying it. Say Virgin Atlantic Boss Richard Branson wanted to get one in the air and charge for tourists who still want to fly Concorde. I remember something that he wanted to buy them before but how long would it take to make one or two air worthy again?
 
spacecadet
Posts: 2802
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2001 3:36 am

RE: Concorde Air Worthiness

Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:03 pm

No chance. Nobody makes spare parts for them anymore, for one thing, nobody has the capability or desire to perform maintenance on them, and all of them would need maintenance and lots of new parts if they were going to fly again. It would be more than impractical to get them back in flying condition; it would be almost impossible. Add to that the testing and recertification (I don't believe the Concorde is certificated to fly anymore), the logistics of getting one or two back from wherever they are now (and they're all stored or displayed by organizations who wouldn't want to give them up), plus the problems the Concorde's always had that would still exist, and it just wouldn't make any sense.
I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
 
GDB
Posts: 12653
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

RE: Concorde Air Worthiness

Sat Nov 06, 2004 7:46 pm

The type certificate was surrendered late last year, as Spacecadet says, the complex and extensive infrastructure that supported this operation no longer exists.

Look, with Concorde you have to remember that few were built, so relatively few people had real experience on the type, it was not like operating a mass produced aircraft.
Even as late as July 2003, BA, with all their experience and pioneering operation on the type, with so many of the Engineering staff having been with the aircraft since the start, in the case of our ex BAC employees, having been with Concorde before the start of operations, with a niggling but minor problem on one aircraft, still they traced and contacted a BAe guy who had retired in 1996, but whose opinion we wanted to help resolve this issue.

Or in late 1997, when United Space Alliance (who maintained the Space Shuttle), visited BA Concorde Engineering for advice on running a tiny fleet of unique air vehicles long out of production, they did not go to the nearest aircraft MX facility in FLA, they came to us as they saw our operation as the next nearest thing to what they were doing.

To return a decommissioned BA Concorde to flight, you'd have to do it soon, even if you had permission and the people, the costs of re-commissioning would run into 100's of millions of £, mostly trying to recreate something like the support network, even the hydraulic fluid was unique to Concorde, Chevron who made it, would want top $ for restarting production of M2V fluid in small amounts.