chrisjake
Posts: 894
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 11:19 am

UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Fri Jan 21, 2005 11:54 pm

hello...

on January 19 i flew on UAL flight 940 from LAX-ORD. the ticket said 940, the monitor at LAX said 940, even the flight attendants told the passengers that our callsign on channel 9 would be "United 940"......

....BUT.....

i listened to channel 9 for most of the way and discovered that we were really "United 8136".

can anyone tell me why this was?

numerous times while listening to my scanner i hear UAL 81XX flights overhead....so does this happen often???

thanks
chris
 
kbuf737
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Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2003 2:22 pm

RE: UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Fri Jan 21, 2005 11:58 pm

Usually if there are a few flights in the air, say with numbers UAL 355, UAL 365, UAL 535, and UAL 1265, they may be given totally different call signs so as to not confuse themselves with other planes around them. Therefore an assignment will clearly be understood to that airplane, so that 5 planes don't turn in the same direction to avoid the same plane and other safety precautions.
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727stretch
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Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2004 11:59 am

RE: UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Sat Jan 22, 2005 12:55 am

UA 940 has two segments: LAX-ORD and ORD-FRA. Because two flight plans with the same flight# cannot be filed with ATC at the same time, one of the legs must file a pseudo flight #. You see this a lot with UAL two-segment flights: 981 BOS-IAD-MEX is usually filed as UAL 8156 BOS-IAD and 861 BOS-IAD-GRU is usually filed as UAL 8143 BOS-IAD. Hope that helps (however, the flight attendants should have told you the correct flight # to monitor on ATC).
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Goldenshield
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RE: UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:04 am

727 -

Multiple segment flights can be and are filed, but not at the same time -- the only difference is the origin city. The only time that a new trip number is given is if there will be a conflict, i.e., there is a late inbound flight, and the next leg was swapped to another aircraft to keep the upleg flights on time. This may occur to either leg -- depending on who planned to be airborne first.

Also, many airlines use the 8-9 thousand range for reposition flights. These are most often non-revenue reposition flights, i.e., transfering between non-hub cities.

KBUF -

ATC will usually let us know if there is a conflict with flight numbers. This way, we just switch a few numbers.
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FlyboyOz
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RE: UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:18 am

Well...I flew from SYD to CHC (Christchurch), I saw two NZ flight numbers on the monitors. NZ XXX (three numbers) and NZ XXXX (four numbers) are both flying to CHC. There's no another flight from CHC to somewhere because we arrived in NZ at nearly 12am. This plane was not flying anymore because there were no pax waiting in their gate and CHC departure's lights were off.
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mattnrsa
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Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2002 12:27 pm

RE: UAL Flight 940 Is Really Flight 8136?

Sat Jan 22, 2005 4:36 pm

727Stretch is exactly right.

We both work in ops and see this every day. While 8000 and 9000 flight numbers can be for ferries, charters and repositoning flts, the 8100 series are "radio numbers" used for multi-segment trips, usually ones involving one domestic and one international segment. You will occasionally see this on a domestic to domestic segment (i.e. BOI-DEN-DFW) when the first segment is delayed, causing a conflict with the other. The first segment does not necessarily need to be delayed when the second segment is international, possibly because those international flight plans are entered into the system earlier than a domestic flight would be.