User avatar
N328KF
Topic Author
Posts: 5810
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 3:50 am

Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Mon Jan 24, 2005 10:55 am

We all know that, until 1991, Aeroflot was the world's largest airline. How many pax did it carry during some of those years (in whatever manner can be best gauged.) How easy was it for a Soviet citizen to travel? Was it mostly just party members, or ... ?
When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' -Theodore Roosevelt
 
afay1
Posts: 1206
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 2:37 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Mon Jan 24, 2005 2:05 pm

Well, I have no idea about loads, but when in history are you talking about? 1930, 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990? It makes a difference in terms of government restrictions, air infrastructure, etc. Since every plane in civilian use was "Aeroflot" are you talking about village to village on AN-2, Moscow-Tblisi longhaul on IL-62, Moscow-Warsaw Pact, Moscow-Western Europe, etc.? Hehe, be more specific!
 
RIX
Posts: 1589
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2000 4:46 am

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 5:04 am

In short (during mid-70's to early 90's):

more than 100,000,000 passengers a year (official data);

most of the flights were packed full, but sometimes quite empty;

it was very easy for a Soviet citizen to travel domestically, the tickets were not too expensive, sometimes very cheap - the problem was rather to get them staying in 4+ hours line (personal experience; I'm sure, 4+ hours was by far not a limit). No party membership required...

It was a totally different story to travel abroad. Even to "friendly socialist" country. Enough to say, there were two kinds of passport: one ("internal" - sounds funny, passport by definition is a travel document) actually an ID (with domicile registration, family members listed, nationality - no, not citizenship but ethnic origin, not even religion, ...), and another one ("foreign") for traveling abroad. You couldn't just go and order it - you had to produce documents proving you were going to travel. Then, up to early 90's, in addition to entry visa to a foreign country, you had to get "outgoing" visa to be able to leave your country - just having passport was not enough, you had to get a permission to leave the USSR every time you traveled abroad (however, there were multiple "outgoing" visas too)! There were almost no "private trips", it was either a business trip or "organized tourism". To get to both groups party membership was a great advantage. As for loads, I was lucky to travel abroad like a dozen times during 1989-1992 (when it started to be way easier, especially in Latvia), the aircraft were usually full (however, on some flights there were less than 10 people in Tu134, or about 30 people in Il86), but this was already a different era...


 
ushermittwoch
Posts: 2535
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2004 10:18 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 6:34 am

"Moscow-Tblisi longhaul on IL-62", well I wouldn't call a 1000 mile flight a longhaul.
 Big grin
Where have all the tri-jets gone...
 
User avatar
N328KF
Topic Author
Posts: 5810
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 3:50 am

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 6:36 am

Ushermittwoch:

It was for an Il-62.  Big grin
When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' -Theodore Roosevelt
 
RIX
Posts: 1589
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2000 4:46 am

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 7:13 am

"It was for an Il-62" - most of the flights on this route were on Tu154.
 
widebody
Posts: 1107
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2000 5:08 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 7:21 am

I travelled with them last week and their fleet was less than 100 aircraft according to their magazine, how many aircraft did they have on the go at their peak?
 
afay1
Posts: 1206
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 2:37 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:17 am

Incidentally it is still a requirement for most foreigners traveling in Russia to have a visa that allows them to LEAVE. If you lose it, you will not be allowed to exit the country without a huge hassle and sometimes the intervention of your embassy. The backlog for a person to get an international passport is still about a year. Some CIS countries do not issue passports until age 16, neccesitating travel with parents. Russian passports at least still can carry ethnic origin. It is not a requirement, but older passports have it. Again the question is difficult to answer due to not specificity. Sorry to be anal....
 
User avatar
Aeroflot777
Posts: 2995
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 2:19 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Tue Jan 25, 2005 5:03 pm

It is not a requirement to have a visa allowing you to leave the country. All you need is your ticket and passport, and the Russian visa. That is all. Check-in will consist of checking your passport and ticket, and the passport control will consist of checking you visa and ending it upon your leaving the country. If you are a minor than you do need a document signed by both parents allowing you to leave the country by yourself.
 
afay1
Posts: 1206
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2001 2:37 pm

RE: Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?

Wed Jan 26, 2005 4:00 am

Hmmm, you do in fact need a visa to leave the country. One's Russian visa is usually combined into one for both and people are not aware it is actually an entry/exit document. Some nationalities and some types of visas are seperate pieces of paper. They take the entry visa on entry and you need the seperate piece to exit. As a leader of foreign tourists in and out of Russia, I know the consequences of losing this exit piece of paper. You are denied exit. If you have a combined one, this is not a problem. Anyway, the seperate exit visas are usually green in color rather than blue or stuck directly in the passport. This of course has little to do with aviation....