Doona
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 6:50 pm

Flying around both North America and Europe, I've noticed something peculiar. Right at the beginning of the safety briefings on an MD-80, in the US, F/As refer to the aircraft as the super-80, whilst they never do that in Europe.

I know that the MD-80 was dubbed super-80 when it was marketed by McDonnell Douglas, but how come that name didn't make it across the pond?

(And can some people pleas stop referring to the MD-80 series as DC-9-80, etc. It's like calling the B717 MD95...)

Cheers
Mats
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glidepath73
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:29 pm

Hi Mats!
Maybe it became named like this because the stretch of the fuselage was one of the significant changes comparing to the former (DC-9-50) Series.
Remember, they called some of the DC-8's "Super DC-8", after they change the old engines to the CFM 56 engines. (Dc-8 Super-71 etc. Even the DC-8 got more and more stretched, as the it was with the DC-9 / MD-80 / MD-90.
I think the name "SUPER-80" was very often used in the US, but never became that popular here in Europe.

Regards,
Patrick
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SATL382G
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:51 pm

If you check out the type certificate it is in fact a DC-9-81, 82, 83.
It wasn't until the MD88 that they actually changed the name. Super-80... You must have been on AA right?
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TriStar500
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:06 pm

Maybe other airlines have realized that by 21st century standards, the "Super 80" is not so "super" anymore, and therefore refrain from calling the MD-80 this way.
 duck 
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captaink
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:38 pm

We have an old engine cover from BWIA at the back of the airport.. And it has the words "BWIA DC-9 Super80" printed on it.. SO I guess super 80 was used over here too.

Off topic though, I want that engine cover for the wall on my room. SInce BWIA doesn't fly MD-83's anymore I don't think they will need it. Am I crazy? LOL
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LVTMB
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:49 pm

I believe that Super-80 was the name that AA used for its MD80-83 fleet. Airlines used to do that more often in the past. There were "Astrojets" and "Coronados" and "Whisperliners" and "Super-80s". I also got the impression that AA is moving away from that and referring to its Super-80s as "Boeing MD80".

MB
 
milesrich
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:50 pm

Super 80 is, to my knowledge, only used by American Airlines. The reasoning for this goes back to a time before American even flew the airplane. In the 1970's, American introduced Wide Body aircraft as 747 and DC-10 Luxury Liners. They then put new interiors in their 707 and 727 and called them Luxury Jets. Then AA 191 crashed at ORD on 5/25/79, and the Ten was grounded. After the grounding was lifted, the words DC-10 were removed from Americans signage and promotion. In 1982, McDonnell Douglas, in an almost panic to sell their latest version of the DC-9, the DC-9-80 series, made a proposal to American and TWA to lease them airplanes at bargain basement prices. If the airplanes did not perform up to MDD's promises, they could be returned. The airplane performed so well that American eventually ordered and took delivery of 275 aircraft. But marketing had a problem. D C NINE DASH EIGHTY is a mouthful, and the DC-9 had been around in various forms for 17 years. American did not want to their passengers and the public to think they were buying an "old" airplane, so they called the jet, the Super 80 Luxury Jet.

In the US today, in addition to AA, only Delta still operates the MD80 in any numbers. The Delta aircraft is called the MD-88 which, unlike AA's 82/83's, has a glass cockpit, and uprated engines. Delta calls their craft the MD-88, and has never used the Super 80 name, nor has Delta, which retired their last DC-9-32's with the delivery of sufficient MD-88's in 1992, ever referred to the airplane as a DC-9 Super 80. Additionally, by the time Delta was taking delivery of their fleet, MDD was no longer calling the plane a DC-9 either.
 
exFATboy
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:51 pm

Quoting Lvtmb (Reply 5):
There were "Astrojets" and "Coronados" and "Whisperliners" and "Super-80s". I also got the impression that AA is moving away from that and referring to its Super-80s as "Boeing MD80".

I sort of miss the old naming...last one I can remember was when PSA named the BAe-146 the "Smileliner." *sigh*

And I'd like to cast a vote right now for stamping out this business of calling old DC- and MD- aircraft "Boeings" now. I don't care if Boeing bought MDD. Chrysler dropped the Plymouth name, but we don't go around taking about all those great "Chrysler (or Dodge) RoadRunners" from the '70s, now do we? And GM's dropping the Oldsmobile name, but if anyone ever says "Chevy 442" I will slap them. Hard.

I'm willing to go along with Boeing 717, since the 717 was manufactured and (ineffectively) marketed for a long time after the merger. If someone wanted to be really pedantic and call a post-merger MD-11 a "Boeing", I might be willing to let the anal retentivity go.

But it's not a "Boeing" DC-9, MD-80, or whatever, it's a "McDonnell Douglas".

(Yes, I'm a little cranky this morning...)  silly 
 
OE-LDA
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:57 pm

Austrian Airlines used the term "Super 80" too, when the aircraft was introduced in the early 80s.

Regards, OE-LDA
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Starlionblue
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:21 am

Quoting Doona (Thread starter):
I know that the MD-80 was dubbed super-80 when it was marketed by McDonnell Douglas, but how come that name didn't make it across the pond?

The name is still in use on the Eastern side of the pond


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FlyingTexan
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:34 am

Quoting Milesrich (Reply 6):
American did not want to their passengers and the public to think they were buying an "old" airplane, so they called the jet, the Super 80 Luxury Jet.

Thank you, Milesrich, for the insight. A few years back I had a non-aviation co-worker connecting thru Dallas. He said “I assume American’s Super 80 is the same as other airlines’ MD-80.”

My reply - Yes, it is just American’s way of making you think their MD-80 is bigger/better/newer/nicer/faster than – say – Delta’s.
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EA CO AS
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:40 am

FWIW, at Alaska Airlines you'll only hear the term "MD-80" or "Boeing MD-80" used.
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jetBlue
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:38 am

Quoting ExFATboy (Reply 7):
I can remember was when PSA named the BAe-146 the "Smileliner."

The Smileliner??? Holy cow. That is one of the ugliest, fat looking beasts in the sky today. The only time I smile is when I step off the darn thing.  Smile

jetBlue
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airsicknessbag
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:54 am

Quoting SATL382G (Reply 2):
If you check out the type certificate it is in fact a DC-9-81, 82, 83.
It wasn't until the MD88 that they actually changed the name.

Ok, up to now I thought every MD8X's official name is always DC9-8X.

How do I have to understand this, SATL382G?

Every pre-87 (1987 being the 88's release date [?]) is a DC9-8X, while everything after that date is an MD81, MD82, MD83, MD87 or MD88.

OR

Every MD81 through 87 is officially a DC9-81 through 87, while every MD88 is just an MD88?

Thanks in advance for clearing that up.

Daniel Smile
 
tothestars
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Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:13 am

At TWA we used the term MD80 or just 80. I never considered it that "super" of a plane compared to the 1011s, 727s, and 747s that we flew. Now with all the RJs flying, the 80 almost seems like a widebody.
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Starlionblue
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:30 am

Quoting Jetblue (Reply 12):

Every MD81 through 87 is officially a DC9-81 through 87, while every MD88 is just an MD88?

Thanks in advance for clearing that up.

Correct, and the MD-90 is an MD-90-30.
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September11
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:39 am

Apparently American Airlines is removing "Super 80" label on their Super 80's.

Left picture: With "Super 80"
Right picture: Without "Super 80"

Edit: I think they are removing black noses, as well


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[Edited 2005-03-24 01:50:21]
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malaysia
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:54 am

I wish they made the MD-90-50, I love the MD-90 so much but this thread reminds me of referral, but my parents flew an Icelandair DC-8 once and the F/A referred it to a "707 stretch"!!! thats silly
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captaink
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:08 pm

Definitely not AA alone with the Super80 term. BW didn't have it on the aircraft itself, but as i mentioned it sure was on the engine covers...
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Brick
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:47 pm

The right picture on the is an ex-TWA aircraft. I would say they aren't applying the title any longer, not that they are "removing them".

Mark
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Newark777
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 1:00 pm

I have also noticed that American Eagle calls their ATR-72's "Super ATR's." I don't know if this is just an American Eagle thing, since I have never been on an ATR for any other airline. It's also written on the very top of the vertical stabilizers.


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Harry

[Edited 2005-03-24 05:03:07]
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September11
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 1:00 pm

Good observation, Mark. My question here: does all original AA M82s still have "Super 80" title?
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AsstChiefMark
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RE: Why Not "Super-80" In Europe?

Thu Mar 24, 2005 1:57 pm

I always use the term "MD80" when talking to the AA reservations people. They keep calling it a "Super 80" and I keep calling it an MD80. One time, an AA reservations woman asked me, "Why do you keep calling it by the wrong name?" I just laughed and told her that SHE was using the wrong name.

Mark
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