AirWillie6475
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English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 2:19 pm

I wonder why English is the international language of aviation? Why not French or German. It must be strange for different pilots of different countries trying to speak 2 different languages while flying and communicating. Imagine if the language was Russian, can you speak all the flight related conversation Russian while talking in English to your crew? I guess thats what Int Pilots do! I never thought about this much till today. Any comments?
 
COSPN
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 2:41 pm

Cause Americans Invented the Airplane...

Someone comes up with something else...everyone can speak that....
 
mrniji
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 2:52 pm

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Thread starter):
It must be strange for different pilots of different countries trying to speak 2 different languages while flying and communicating.

Not really! I myself am bilingual and do not habe a problem to switch. Moreover, pilots become used to communicating in English while talking to their crew in their respective language.

We should not forget that English is more widely spoken than many other languages. While there might be more native speakers of other languages, English as second language has become a quite, albeit not overall, modell.

In terms of security, I think it is important to have one uniform language, though there was a thread ages ago stating that some pilots use their native language while communicating to home ATC..

I think, for professional pilots, it is not a big deal. And it is a good idea to have English, which de facto has extended its reach in the globalization process, is the aviation language.,.

hope this helps  Wink
"The earth provides enough resources for everyone's need, but not for some people's greed." (Gandhi)
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 2:55 pm

I'm would say that the rationale behind it is that English is the 3rd most common native language, and the 1st most studied as a secondary language.

As to why it is the language of aviation, I would venture the guess that early flight was dominated by English speaking countries such as the UK and the US when the "rules" were constructed and air traffic became an issue in the early 20th Century.

It seems like basic evolution and adoptation. English is also the primary language of medicine, although archaic Latin would seem to be the obvious choice.
We can agree to disagree.
 
AFinMIA
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 4:56 pm

It may just very well change one day. The way I was taught to always put "Por Avon" on my overseas mail. That was because for the longest time French was considered the international language. Now it has been English for many years and one day it will change to another, there seems to be a slight need for some universality don't you agree (no matter where you hail from). Especially when traveling or transporting to a foreign land. Simply put the only benefit is that it makes things understood to everyone, and English just seems to be the most widely known or spoken at the moment.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 5:22 pm

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Thread starter):
It must be strange for different pilots of different countries trying to speak 2 different languages while flying and communicating

If You've been to Mumbai [Bombay] You'll know what a mix of Three-Four languages in a sentence means.
 Smile
I guess since English is Widlely spoken internationally & the American/English made most planes Initially.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)
 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:23 pm

Ok, guys, stop speculating.

There are actually several official aviation languages, English, Russian, Spanish, French and possibly more.
This was decided during the Chicago Convention of 1944, the forerunner of today´s ICAO. Back then, when they noticed that WW2 was slowly coming to a close, the US invited her Allies and many neutral countries for a conference about the future of civil aviation after the war. Obviously Germany, Italy and Japan were not invited, so no German, Italian and Japanese as aviation languages. The idea of the conference was to standartise aviation procedures for international flight, and because back then the US had the biggest experience in long range flights, they set the standard for procedures.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:31 pm

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 6):
Ok, guys, stop speculating.

Thanks for the heads-up. I couldn't find the docs to back my previous statement up.

Cheers!
We can agree to disagree.
 
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PM
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:48 pm

Quoting AFinMIA (Reply 4):
The way I was taught to always put "Por Avon" on my overseas mail. That was because for the longest time French was considered the international language.

You need to fire your French teacher...

As I understand it, English is expected to be spoken even if both the pilot and controller are native speakers of another language. So at Madrid, for example, Iberia pilots will speak English so that all the other traffic can understand. This rule seems to break down in France (why am I not surprised...?) where French is at least sometimes spoken by French pilots. I seem to remember an accident a few years back where the control tower was talking in English to some pilots and in French to others. Not altogether surprisingly, there was a misunderstanding and two planes collided - fatally. My aging memory suggests it was a UK-registered Short 360 having its cockpit torn out by an AOM (?) MD-80 as the French jet started its roll and the 360 taxied at the wrong time or in the wrong place having failed to understand the conversation between the two Frenchmen.

Seems to me that that sort of thing really shouldn't happen.
 
jush
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:57 pm

Quote:
Cause Americans Invented the Airplane...

this isn't true completely. The same as they haven't invented the internet.

Cheers

matt
There is one problem with airbus. Though their products are engineering marvels they lack passion, completely.
 
mrniji
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:12 pm

Quoting PM (Reply 8):
You need to fire your French teacher...

Yes, I agree: par avion! Big grin By the way, French remains the official postal language.. but since only small expressions like recommande, par avion etc are used, this is palpable

Quoting PM (Reply 8):
s rule seems to break down in France (why am I not surprised...?) where French is at least sometimes spoken by French pilots.

I heard the same.. by the way: the lousy, unlogical and irrational imperial system (feet etc). is, as far as I know, the convention in aviation. There was an accident, where an SV plane collidated with some cargo plane from Tadjikistan over India (1996?).. the latter measured in metres, this being a prime reason for that accident (along with the lousy performance of Indian ATC in that case)
"The earth provides enough resources for everyone's need, but not for some people's greed." (Gandhi)
 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:36 pm

The reason why a mix of imperial and metric units is used in aviation is to prevent missunderstandings, you´ll get altitudes in feet, runway visual range in metres, visibility in kilometers, distances in nautical miles (the exception are Russia and China, where all dimensions, except distances are in meters). Also, knots and nautical miles are very well suited for navigational purposes, as having a direct connection to the longitude / latitude system (1 nautical mile equals 1 arc minute latitude or 1 arc minute on the equator).

As I mentioned before, it is perfectly legal for the French to use French in ATC, or e.g. Colombians to use Spanish. I think Mandarin Chinese was also one of the official languages.
Outside controlled airspace you are free to use your native language at any time, e.g. radio contact to ballons and glider pilots over here is mostly done in German.

French used to be historically the language used by diplomats.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
AFinMIA
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:37 pm

Thanks for the heads up PM but since French is My native Tounge. I don't think it's my French teacher, but my typing you should blame.
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:38 pm

Quoting Jush (Reply 9):
The same as they haven't invented the internet.

Good point, Matt. Who *did* invent the Internet?
We can agree to disagree.
 
Jalalabad
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:53 pm

the U.S. DoD

 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:23 pm

The internet started in it´s original form as the ARPANET in the late 1960s. The idea was to have a decentralised command network for the US military, with redundant connections, should one or more command centers be knocked out during a nuclear war. This evolved later into a network connecting several American universities. Later the military split off the civilian network, but at this time the net, though slowly spreading internationally, was mainly used for interchange of scientific data between research institutes, very uncomfortable to use and only something for true computer geeks. The WWW as we know and use it today, was invented by scientists from the European nuclear and high energy physics research institute CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. This brough the breakthrough for the internet in so far that also no-geeks were able to use it.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:28 pm

Quoting Jalalabad (Reply 14):
the U.S. DoD

Thanks for ruining my baited question!  Smile I was waiting for the poo-poo of DARPA and the linking of UCLA, Stanford, UofU, and UCSB with some off-the-hook comment about how Helsinki worked with Johannesburg's Saigon / Tokyo division on behalf of Prague's ambassador to Brazil to "invent" the Internet.

Knowing is half the battle!  Smile
We can agree to disagree.
 
mrniji
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:36 pm

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 11):
French used to be historically the language used by diplomats.

I thought that was Italian??
"The earth provides enough resources for everyone's need, but not for some people's greed." (Gandhi)
 
backfire
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:36 pm

Tim Berners-Lee is internationally credited with inventing the World Wide Web.

And he's British. Just for the record  Wink
 
backfire
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:43 pm

And incidentally, to cut out all the guesswork and nonsense being written about "international languages", there's no "official" international language for aviation.

ICAO's recommendation on the use of language in air/ground communication is very simple - it says that air/ground communications should be carried out in the language of the ground station or in English if requested.

Which means any language is acceptable. It just so happens that it's considered more acceptable within the airline and air traffic control community for everyone to be talking the same language.

English has developed as the 'accepted' language simply because it is the most widely-spoken language (not in terms of the number of speakers but in terms of the geographical spread).
 
jush
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:01 pm

Quote:
The internet started in it´s original form as the ARPANET in the late 1960s. The idea was to have a decentralised command network for the US military, with redundant connections, should one or more command centers be knocked out during a nuclear war. This evolved later into a network connecting several American universities. Later the military split off the civilian network, but at this time the net, though slowly spreading internationally, was mainly used for interchange of scientific data between research institutes, very uncomfortable to use and only something for true computer geeks. The WWW as we know and use it today, was invented by scientists from the European nuclear and high energy physics research institute CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. This brough the breakthrough for the internet in so far that also no-geeks were able to use it.

well thanks, md11engineer, thats the correct explanation and now i don't have to explain it.

Cheers
Matt
There is one problem with airbus. Though their products are engineering marvels they lack passion, completely.
 
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lightsaber
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:23 pm

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Thread starter):
I wonder why English is the international language of aviation?

English was adopted by ICAO as the official language in 1942. Think about the year for a minute. ICAO holds a meeting in Los Angles, you're not going to have any German or French representatives. The British, Australians, South Africans, and other English speaking countries are in LA buying aircraft at panic rates. They meet, they vote to have English the language of aviation. Its as simple as that.

As the allied armies progressed throughout Europe, the airports were converted to English. Same with Japan, etc. By 1950, there was no turning back.

There is also a reason that the STD ICAO sea level condition is LAX. While colder than those from Oz and South Africa would have chosen, its warmer than jolly old England... And so many aircraft were tested in LA anyway... They chose the army airfield that later became LAX as the standard.

Quoting Backfire (Reply 19):
air/ground communications should be carried out in the language of the ground station or in English if requested.

??? That contradicts: The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recently introduced a new mandatory testing requirement for language proficiency for pilots holding Private Pilot or higher licences, air traffic controllers and radio station operators. from : http://www.copanational.org/non-memb...mePageStories/HomePageStory121.htm

English is only optional for a private pilots license. Commercial licenses have required English since 1942. Although the testing was recently made more rigorous.

Lightsaber
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MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:24 pm

You can say that IP/TCP were invented in the united states, together with the whole nameserver system, but the original internet just used more or less FTP and a few other protocolls, while the whole hypertext protocoll (http) and the world wide web (www) was invented in Europe.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:26 pm

Quoting Jush (Reply 20):
well thanks, md11engineer, thats the correct explanation and now i don't have to explain it.

Huh? You don't have to explain that you were absolutely wrong? I don't see how md11engineer was actually agreeing with you. The WWW based on Hypertext Transfer Protocol is *not* the Internet. The Internet is an American "invention". Period. Remote terminal sessions existed looooong before the "web". The WWW and the presentation of websites like A.Net is based on the works of a worldwide consortium that uses the Internet to get things to your computer.

Internet = Engine, drivetrain and tires
WWW = Comfy seat and steering wheel

Your HTTP request ain't going anywhere without underlying IP routing. For more information, see the history of Cisco Systems for routing and w3 for HTTP.
We can agree to disagree.
 
jush
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:49 pm

You're right with that TCP/IP routing there you go. Maybe you just can't say they invented the internet but it seems so though they even have won a prize for development of the internet if i'm not mistaken.
But i'm sure we can close this discussion here because it is just not important who invented what. Lets go back to the important part... Aviation Big grin

Cheers
Matt
There is one problem with airbus. Though their products are engineering marvels they lack passion, completely.
 
wukka
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 9:56 pm

I'll second the back to aviation part!  Smile I guess I just had to defend my career!

Slainte!
We can agree to disagree.
 
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PM
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 10:03 pm

Who invented the Internet makes a nice change from A vs. B... Wink
 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sat Apr 09, 2005 10:21 pm

Quoting Lightsaber (Reply 21):
English was adopted by ICAO as the official language in 1942. Think about the year for a minute. ICAO holds a meeting in Los Angles, you're not going to have any German or French representatives. The British, Australians, South Africans, and other English speaking countries are in LA buying aircraft at panic rates. They meet, they vote to have English the language of aviation. Its as simple as that.

You are wrong there. The base for the ICAO (a suborganisationof the United Nations) was the Chicago Conference of November-December 1944 (also after the Normandy invasion), as I´ve stated above. Obviously Germany, Japan and also Italy (though by then on Allied side) were not invited.
See: http://www.icao.int/icao/en/chicago_conf/

Here is more information about it, right from the horse´s mouth (the ICAO):
http://www.icao.int/icao/en/premises_history.htm

The ICAO was founded in 1947.
Official ICAO languages are English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese and Arabic.
Most western airlines though have internal procedures demanding the use of English (e.g. Lufthansa, where the dialogue between the mechanic and the pilots during pushback and engine start will be held in English, though both are native German speakers).
As pointed out above, English, due to it´s geographical spread, has become the ACCEPTED language of aviation, but local languages and the other official languages of the ICAO are perfectly acceptable. Obviously, if there is international air traffic around, communications between ATC and aircraft should be held in one common language, which more often than not will be English, but it is by no means mandatory that communications will solely be held in English.

Jan
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jambo
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:21 am

Well, pretty soon HINGLISH will takeover as the international Aviation Language....

Recently came across an article on HINGLISH -
http://us.rediff.com/news/2004/oct/17hing.htm
 
ACDC8
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:26 am

Quoting Jambo (Reply 28):
Well, pretty soon HINGLISH will takeover as the international Aviation Language....

As long as I get my chai as I airdash around the world with my would-be wearing only her chaddis!  Smile

cheers,
Patrick
A Grumpy German Is A Sauerkraut
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:56 am

Quoting AirWillie6475 (Thread starter):
It must be strange for different pilots of different countries trying to speak 2 different languages while flying and communicating. Imagine if the language was Russian, can you speak all the flight related conversation Russian while talking in English to your crew? I guess thats what Int Pilots do! I never thought about this much till today. Any comments?

I can speak 4 languages and switch between sentences. If you're used to it  Wink

Quoting AFinMIA (Reply 4):
It may just very well change one day. The way I was taught to always put "Por Avon" on my overseas mail.

Shouldn't that be "Par Avion"?
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
backfire
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:51 am

That contradicts: The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recently introduced a new mandatory testing requirement for language proficiency for pilots holding Private Pilot or higher licences, air traffic controllers and radio station operators.


It doesn't contradict at all. ICAO is introducing a multi-level proficiency scheme to ensure that pilots and controllers are able to speak English clearly - because English can be requested on demand from pilots.

That doesn't mean that pilots have to speak English to ATC. It simply means that, in cases where English is necessary to communicate - because there's no other common language shared by the pilot and ATC - the proficiency must be such that it's clear and effective.
 
COSPN
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 8:01 am

Quote:
Cause Americans Invented the Airplane...

this isn't true completely. The same as they haven't invented the internet.

Cheers

matt

ok www invented in Geneva...so who had a "aeroplane" flying before the Wright brothers mabe my American History is wrong  Smile
 
beechnut
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 8:25 am

In Canada, in Quebec and a couple of airports outside Quebec (Ottawa for one), traffic may communicate with ATC in either French or English. I was out flying my Beech today and all my radio work was in French (although I only flew in a Mandatory Frequency area at an uncontrolled airport) because all local traffic was French-speaking.

Moreover, on Air Canada, the flight deck language can be either French or English provided both pilots agree on and understand the chosen language. When I fly through Montreal Class C and D airspace, it's routine to hear AC and Jazz flights speak to ATC in French.

There's this mistaken notion that English is the ONLY acceptable language in aviation. It is not. It is however the international language in the sense that when, for example, a Russian plane is flying through French airspace, English will be used as the common language.

It's been this way in Canada since the late 70s. There was a HUGE outcry when this was introduced, that this would lead to planes falling out of the sky due to miscommunication. To my knowledge there has not been any accident attributed to the use of French in Canadian skies. It can make situational awareness a challenge; I'm fluently bilingual so it doesn't matter to me. On the other hand, if ATC speaks to a PPL who's English is marginal, in French, the PPL is much more likely to understand and comply.

And ATC does a wonderful job of refereeing the skies. You'll hear a controller rattle off "Tango Lima Mike, traffic, 4 miles 10 o'clock just above you at 5000, a Regional Jet----Air Canada 123 traffic, 4 milles à deux heures, un Beech à 3500 pieds", in one go.

Mike
 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 8:52 am

Quoting COSPN (Reply 32):
so who had a "aeroplane" flying before the Wright brothers mabe my American History is wrong Smile

Actually the basic work on aerodynamics was done by the Lilienthal brothers, Otto and Gustav, in Berlin, Germany. After studying the flight of storks, and building a wind tunnel they discovered the importance of camber in airfoils.
Otto Lilienthal was by profession an engineer and had some spare money to use for experiments due to having invented a new steam boiler design, which he built in his own factory and which sold quite well. Gustav was a successfull architect. From birds and windtunnel experiments (they discovered e.g. the formula for lift and drag which is still being used today and developed the polar diagram, which shows the behaviour of lift or drag over angle of attack and shows when an airfoil starts to stall), they went to build man carrying gliders.
Following their wind tunnel experiments and experiments with models, they built a series of hang gliders, which were definitely flying in the 1890s. They were about to install a CO2 engine on one of their gliders (Otto had an artificial hill built in the Berlin district of Lichterfelde, it still exists today, with a memorial on top), when Otto Lilienthal crashed with one of his gliders and died next day on August 10, 1896.
Here is more:
http://www.wam.umd.edu/~stwright/WrBr/inventors/Lilienthal.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Lilienthal

The Lilienthal brothers wrote a book about their aerodynamic discoveries, which inspired the Wright brothers to try themselves in flying and gave them a theoretical background. Their achievement was
a) to invent the aerodynamic three axis control (Lilienthal´s gliders were controlled by shifting weight, a factor which contributed to Otto´s crash during a gust of wind)
b) to build an engine which was light and powerfull enough to propel a plane.

Curtiss improved the Wright´s control system (they used wing warping) by installing ailerons, an invention of a French designer).

After the Wrights flew successfully, they soon got involved more in lawsuits about patent infringements (they tried to keep a monopoly on motorised, controlled flight, which greatly inhibited further development in the US) than to continue to develop their plane. Up to late WW1 most aircraft development was actually done in Europe, especially France, Britain and Germany. New interest in aviation developed in the US only late during WW1, when the American government discovered how far back they had fallen in the development of aircraft.


Jan

Edit for typos

[Edited 2005-04-10 02:08:27]
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
COSPN
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 9:02 am

Thank u very much...makes sense the Wrights had something to base upon..

they didnt just wake up one day and make the "flyer"..
 
leelaw
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 9:13 am

Quoting BeechNut (Reply 33):
Air Canada 123 traffic, 4 milles à deux heures, un Beech à 3500 pieds"

Reminds me of what my old Latin teacher used to say..."those 'Gauls' never did learn to speak or spell properly!"  Smile
Lex Ancilla Justitiae
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 4:41 pm

Quoting Mrniji (Reply 17):
Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 11):
French used to be historically the language used by diplomats.

I thought that was Italian??

Latin - Roman hegemony->Late Middle Ages
Italian - Late Middle Ages->Renaissance
French - 17th->18th Centuries
English - Grew with the British Empire

I think you'll find that diplomats have always had a good proficiency in several languages.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
MD11Engineer
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 9:04 pm

I think English only really kicked in as international diplomatic language after WW2, due to both, the American influence and the British empire.

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 9:10 pm

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 38):
I think English only really kicked in as international diplomatic language after WW2, due to both, the American influence and the British empire.

I will amend my earlier statement and agree with this. German was very important internationally up until the end of WWII.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
atmx2000
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Sun Apr 10, 2005 11:17 pm

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 15):
The WWW as we know and use it today, was invented by scientists from the European nuclear and high energy physics research institute CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. This brough the breakthrough for the internet in so far that also no-geeks were able to use it.

Strictly speaking, the WWW as we know and use it today required further development. The original browsers that were developed weren't completely user friendly. It really wasn't until the NCSA at University of Illinois-Urbana-Champagne developed and released Mosaic that there was a widely available client that resembled the browsers that we have today in terms of both user interface and capability.

It should also be noted that the original work done at CERN was in some ways a derivative of existing work. For example HTML is a modified subset of SGML, which was an ANSI and ISO standard that evolved from IBM's GML from the 70s.
ConcordeBoy is a twin supremacist!! He supports quadicide!!
 
eilennaei
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:49 pm

The Internet is an American "invention".

At the end of the day, there's no such thing as "the Internet". There's just a huge set of hardware and software using a jungle/maze of "compatible" protocols. Who fathered this thing can not be resolved, although names have been named. Many people who will never be indentified have contributed, most in good faith, but increasingly with malicious intentions more recently.

Take this forum, for instance. There can be said to be an "inventor", but you would not get very far without the contributors.

-Eilennaei
 
tockeyhockey
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RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Mon Apr 11, 2005 10:09 pm

Quoting Jush (Reply 9):
Quote:
Cause Americans Invented the Airplane...

this isn't true completely.

oh, i can't wait to hear your explanation for this one. do tell, if the americans didn't invent the airplane, who did?
 
FriendlySkies
Posts: 3540
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2004 3:57 pm

RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Mon Apr 11, 2005 10:55 pm

Quoting Wukka (Reply 13):
Good point, Matt. Who *did* invent the Internet?

It's obviously Al Gore........  sarcastic 
 
MD11Engineer
Posts: 13916
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:25 am

RE: English, Int. Aviation Language

Mon Apr 11, 2005 11:11 pm

Quoting Tockeyhockey (Reply 42):
oh, i can't wait to hear your explanation for this one. do tell, if the americans didn't invent the airplane, who did?

Check post #34. There were also otherinventors earlier at work, like Cagley in Britain during the early 19th century. The Wright brothers made valuble contributions, but they were not the only ones and used a lot of data and information gained by others.
Most progress between 1906 and 1917 came actually from Europe, this is the reason why there are so many French terms in aviation (aileron, empenage, nacelle etc.)

Jan
Je Suis Charlie et je suis Ahmet aussi