Cory6188
Topic Author
Posts: 2609
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 12:29 am

Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 6:42 am

When I flew down to PBI this past weekend on CO, I was able to get exit row seats in both directions.

It sounds like a stupid question, but the door said the words "Pull" and "Hale". In Spanish, the verb "jalar" means to pull, which means that the logical usted command form (for any of you who know Spanish) would be "jale".

Why do they use "hale" instead?
 
MAH4546
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Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2001 1:44 pm

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:09 am

Jalar means "to pull" as in "to haul/tow", like "the truck pulls the cargo" . "Halar" means "to pull" as into to "pull foward", as in "pull the exit door foward".
a.
 
ikramerica
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Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 9:33 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:11 am

What are they in Swedish? Just out of curiosity.
Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
 
Cory6188
Topic Author
Posts: 2609
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 12:29 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:12 am

Huh - I never knew that. Thanks for pointing that out. I asked my Spanish teacher, and she had never heard of halar versus jalar.
 
DCAYOW
Posts: 542
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2003 3:24 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:27 am

On Southwest I think it said "Jale" - but it was for the device that you pulled to disengage the exit window.
Retorne ao céu...
 
luisca
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Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2001 11:37 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:30 am

JALE is mainly used in Mexico, in almost all of the other spanish speaking nations the correct form is HALE from the verb HALAR which means to pull.
The doors in comerciall places usually say push or pull, I have only seen JALE in Mexico, in the rest of latin america all doors say HALE

The "Real Academia de la Lengua Espanola" Dictionary (equivalent to Websters in English) gives both words the same definition, it does not specify which term is correct.

Each country has its own local office of the Real Academia, they each publish their own dictionary, in the Panamanian dictionary which is the one I know HALE is the correct word. JALE is not even mentioned.

JALE is a regionalism. HALE is the most common form and used in the majority of countries. That said, the fact that each country has its own dictionary is proof of how diverse spanish is. You really appreciate this here in Miami, were I learn a new word all the time.

[Edited 2005-11-16 23:34:15]
If it ain't Boeing (or Embraer ;-)) I ain't Going!
 
ContnlEliteCMH
Posts: 1376
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2005 8:19 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:31 am

I find it ironic that you must speak English to sit in an exit row on an American carrier. And yet, the instructions are in Spanish as well. Funny, funny...
Christianity. Islam. Hinduism. Anthropogenic Global Warming. All are matters of faith!
 
sflaflight
Posts: 494
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 12:33 pm

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:37 am

You are correct MAH4546. I never knew that either. As a latino who grew up in the US, I never even knew there was a difference. But here is the catch.... I'm confused... My vox dictionary from Spain has both entries, but my North American English-Spanish dictionary doesn't make the distinction. Could it be dialectal or is one dictionary just wrong? But, remember that the pronunciation would be different. The letter j is pronounced h in Spanish, which would be [hale] phonetically. The letter h is silent, so hale would be pronounced [ale] phonetically. So, while the look similar in English, they're not even the same word. Ah, the things we learn on this board!!! See, and mom says I waste my time on this thing!
 Confused
 
luisca
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Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2001 11:37 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 7:52 am

Quoting Sflaflight (Reply 7):
But here is the catch.... I'm confused... My vox dictionary from Spain has both entries, but my North American English-Spanish dictionary doesn't make the distinction. Could it be dialectal or is one dictionary just wrong?

Read my post #5
Mexicans pronounce haalei the rest pronounce aalei

it is a regionalism
If it ain't Boeing (or Embraer ;-)) I ain't Going!
 
Lan_Fanatic
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Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2001 11:41 am

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:08 am

Quoting MAH4546 (Reply 1):

Wow, I didn't know that! Thanks for the info.

The words jalar and halar are practically non existant in the chilean spanish vocabulary. Instead we use for push/pull empuje/tire
 
AR1300
Posts: 1686
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 1:22 pm

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:13 am

ditto here  Smile


Mike
You are now free to move about the cabin
 
sflaflight
Posts: 494
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 12:33 pm

RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:24 am

Quoting Luisca (Reply 5):
JALE is a regionalism. HALE is the most common form and used in the majority of countries. That said, the fact that each country has its own dictionary is proof of how diverse spanish is. You really appreciate this here in Miami, were I learn a new word all the time.

Trust me Luisca, living and working in Miami as well, I go through this quite often also. And thanks to Reggaeton, still changing by the minute!
 Wink

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 9):
The words jalar and halar are practically non existant in the chilean spanish vocabulary. Instead we use for push/pull empuje/tire

Absolutely, actually, because I also speak French and Italian, they would be my first choice. Tirez, Tirare!
 
PDPsol
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RE: Spanish Language On Emergency Exit Doors

Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:48 am

Quoting Lan_Fanatic (Reply 9):
The words jalar and halar are practically non existant in the chilean spanish vocabulary. Instead we use for push/pull empuje/tire

As with Chile, no one uses the term "jale" or "hale" in Argentina or Uruguay when referring to "pull".

Regional accents and terms are radically different in various parts of Latin America. Someone from say, Mexico, would most likely need quite some time in Bs.As. if he/she wanted to pick up the 'rioplatense' accent and learn all the local terms [and vice-versa].

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