QFA380
Topic Author
Posts: 2013
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:38 pm

Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 7:18 am

I have some questions about emergency doors. Please don't flame me if this topic has been discussed before, I did a search and I couldn't find anything.

First of all, on widebodies are there certain censors that will open the doors, does the pilot push some button or does the computer do it?

Secondly how do the doors open, does someone have to open the doors themselves or do the have rockets underneath that blow the door off?

I went on a Dash 8 a while ago and noticed that their are small panels around some windows, I wasn't allowed to sit their as I'm still a kid.What if a stupid pax decided to open one of the emergency exits at 25 000ft? Are the doors locked and the pilots need to unlock via some switch?

Thanks in advance.

QFA380

Happy New Year
 
DouglasDC8
Posts: 264
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:57 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 7:35 am

Emergency exit doors usually will have a simple mechanism to open them. Some widebody aircraft have electrically assisted doors (they also have a manual backup). The switches are near or on the doors, they can't be remotely operated. There's nothing there to blow the doors off, it's not needed.

Of course, due to the design of the doors, it's impossible to open them when the cabin is pressurized. No matter how hard a person tries to open the door handle it won't open. The door itself is pressed against the aircraft's door frame by the huge amount of air pressure in the cabin. This is called a "plug" type of door. Even doors that swing out are larger than the doorway's opening when they're closed. They usually will have some part of the door that folds inward to allow it to open.

Hope that answers your questions.

Happy New Year
 
Matt72033
Posts: 1589
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 10:03 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 7:45 am

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):
First of all, on widebodies are there certain censors that will open the doors, does the pilot push some button or does the computer do it?

handles on the inside of the door, airbus use a vertical handle, pulled from the bottom up to open the door on the a340 anyway, whereas boeing use a horizontal rotating handle, that moves 180 degrees to open the door! on the 744

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):
Secondly how do the doors open, does someone have to open the doors themselves or do the have rockets underneath that blow the door off?

theres a switch on the door, its moved from manual or disarmed (on the ground) to automatic or armed, depending on manufacturer, just before take off! you normally hear the captain on the PA "doors to armed and cross check"

when in the armed, or automatic position, if you opened the door, the slide will deploy. the dorr will be pulled open and out of the way first by compressed nitrogen!

if the aircrafts on the ground and you open a door and hear a whoosh! let go immedietley or the door WILL take you with it!

if the door is in manual or disarmed it can be opened with no problems!

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):
went on a Dash 8 a while ago and noticed that their are small panels around some windows, I wasn't allowed to sit their as I'm still a kid.What if a stupid pax decided to open one of the emergency exits at 25 000ft? Are the doors locked and the pilots need to unlock via some switch

impossible! for the reasons mentioned above!
 
lincoln
Posts: 3133
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:22 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 9:10 am

I beleive, though in thinking about it I have no good reason to belelve, that on the 737NG series (specifically -800s and -900s, can't remember about -700s) that if you start yanking on the outer cover of the handle for the over-wing exits that an alarm winds up sounding somewhere (not sure if it would be flightdeck or one of the Flight Attendant positions.

I know on the ground, my curiosity has -almost- gotten the better of me ("Well, the handle said 'Pull' and I didn't see any fire when I looked out the window, so I pulled it....oh, you're only suposed to do that in an emergency?!?!? Someone really should tell you that...") but I figured it would be somewhere between "very, very bad" and "FBI involved bad", even if the exit wasn't actually opened, so...

(No, I would never actually considered opening an exit window, but I would like to see what happens some day, especially since on the 737NGs the door seems to open up and out (A FA told me once it was spring loaded so once you pull you let go, or it takes care of evacuating you from the aircraft...but not sure how true that is))

On one of my flights, the little cover that's velcroed on at the bottom of the window (covering what looks like it would be a handle to pull the thing back closed) had popped off (or fallen off, it was like that when we boarded...I did point it out to the FAs) and I noticed a stamp on the back side of it...made by a company just down the street from my former employer in San Marcos, CA.
CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
 
Cadet57
Posts: 7174
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2005 2:02 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 9:38 am

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 2):
"doors to armed and cross check"

What does "cross check" mean? I hear it all the time and always wondered what it ment.
Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
 
User avatar
antoniemey
Posts: 1229
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:38 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 9:47 am

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 4):
What does "cross check" mean? I hear it all the time and always wondered what it ment.

Means the flight attendents check each others' doors to make sure they're properly armed.
Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
 
Cadet57
Posts: 7174
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2005 2:02 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 9:52 am

Oh, cool, thanks for clearin that up for me.

Later,
Justin
Doors open, right hand side, next stop is Springfield.
 
VHXLR8
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:58 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:02 am

Quoting Matt72033 (Reply 2):
when in the armed, or automatic position, if you opened the door, the slide will deploy. the dorr will be pulled open and out of the way first by compressed nitrogen!

True, arming a door engages the slide/slideraft and the power assist. There is, however, no compressed nitrogen, the doors are foreced open by the power assist mechanism.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 3):
I beleive, though in thinking about it I have no good reason to belelve, that on the 737NG series (specifically -800s and -900s, can't remember about -700s) that if you start yanking on the outer cover of the handle for the over-wing exits that an alarm winds up sounding somewhere (not sure if it would be flightdeck or one of the Flight Attendant positions

Nope, there's no alarms invovled in these exits.

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 5):
Means the flight attendents check each others' doors to make sure they're properly armed

It should also be noted that cross-checking is an airline specific procudure, not an overall thing, as many airlines do not cross-check, but rather have other checks in place.
 
EMBQA
Posts: 7798
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 3:52 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:20 am

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
There is, however, no compressed nitrogen, the doors are foreced open by the power assist mechanism.

Not true. The new Embraer 170-190 family have a nitrogen pre-charge that blows open the door when opened in the armed position.
"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
 
lincoln
Posts: 3133
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:22 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:26 am

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
Nope, there's no alarms invovled in these exits.

Thanks for setting me straight on that, like I said in my original post, I don't know how I got that idea in my head...

On the subject, what's involved in "Arming" or "Disarming" a floor-level exit? I know one part is snaping the orange strap across the window, but beyond that...

Lincoln
CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
 
EMBQA
Posts: 7798
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 3:52 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:46 am

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 9):
On the subject, what's involved in "Arming" or "Disarming" a floor-level exit? I

Most doors have an 'Armed' handle which is moved into a locked position prior to take off. When doing this, the Grit Bar is engaged into a locked position in the floor. It is the grit bar that when the door is opened in the armed position rips the slide pack from its stowed position and inflates the slide.
"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
 
aa757first
Posts: 3140
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2003 11:40 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 12:07 pm

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):

First of all, on widebodies are there certain censors that will open the doors, does the pilot push some button or does the computer do it?

No. Doors are always operated by flight attendants.

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):

Secondly how do the doors open, does someone have to open the doors themselves or do the have rockets underneath that blow the door off?

As I said before, doors are always operated by flight attendants. That includes emergency situations.

Quoting QFA380 (Thread starter):

I went on a Dash 8 a while ago and noticed that their are small panels around some windows, I wasn't allowed to sit their as I'm still a kid.What if a stupid pax decided to open one of the emergency exits at 25 000ft? Are the doors locked and the pilots need to unlock via some switch?

Doors are almost always bigger than the opening, so the pressure differences keep the door firmly in place. It is impossible for any human being to open up a cabin door once the aircraft is above a few thousand feet.

---


MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © Gage Donovan



That is an Airbus A319 door. Doors on the A318, A319 and A320 are the same. All but one pair of doors on the A321 are the same as well.

To open that door, you push that orange lever up to the "Open" position. The door pops out and you slide it out of the way, kind of like a mini-van door. To close it, you depress a lock called a "gust lock" (a lock that prevents to door from slamming shut when it's windy out, on this door it is that tan button), slide it back in the opposite direction, and pull that orange handle back down.

To arm the door, you would push that yellow lever behind that red strap down so it is flush to the fuselage. To disarm, push it back up.


MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © MT



This is the "plain" door. To open, pull that silver lever to the "open position" and push the door out. To close, depress the gust lock (on a hinge) and pull the door back in. Then, rotate that silver lever in the opposite way (where it is in the picture).

The red strap indicates to ground crew that the door is armed. In the past, ground crew members have been seriously harmed by flight attendants forgetting to disarm doors. With that red strap, ground crew members know that the door is armed, and not to open it until flight attendants give them a thumbs up. Some doors automatically disarm when opened from the outside. Just off the top of my head: BAe 146, 747, 767, 777, L-1011 and all Airbuses.

To arm this door, there is a metal bar ("girt bar") that is placed into the door ("girt bar holders") and that will inflate the slide. To disarm, do the opposite.


MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © Jacob Griffin



This is a tailcone. It is found only on aircraft that have the exits at the back of the aircraft. DC-9, MD-80, MD-90 and 717 are the only ones I know of that have these.

There are actually two different handles on this door. One is used when you want a slide to deploy, one is used when you don't want a slide to deploy.

Right now, that door is disarmed. The exposed handle is used for situations where you don't want the slide to deploy. To arm the door, you would slide that piece of fabric (the one square above the other two squares) over the exposed handle. There would be a smaller handle that is used for slide inflation.

http://www.filefactory.com/get/f.php?f=e0922b9e6318d2f01c699743
This is a video about how to open a 767 door. The L-1011 operates in the same basic way. It is 7 MB.

AAndrew
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 1:03 pm

It's actually a good thing the doors are not opened "all at once" by a push of a button. In an emergency, it's important to assess "outside conditions" before opening a door; if there was a fire outside, you most certainly would not want to open the exit since...
1) Flames and smoke could enter the cabin which is bad
2) Passengers may evacuate into the flames and smoke without realizing it which is also bad
3) The flames may burst the evacuation slide, which is also very bad

Additionally, other conditions which may not be the best idea to open the door is...
1) Sharp debris that may cause the slide to be ripped or interfere with the evacuation
2) Water above the lower door sill.
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
 
qqflyboy
Posts: 1618
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 1:47 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 1:23 pm

The window exits on 737 NG's (-7. -8, -9) are not plug type exits. In fact, they are spring loaded and when the handle is pulled down, the window exit goes out and up, staying attatched to the aircraft. When the pilots apply takeoff thrust there is an automatic locking mechanism to prevent these windows from being opened inflight. When the weight of the aircraft settles on the landing gear, these locks release.

Airbus A300 aircraft also have a similar locking mechanism and if you attempt to open the door when the lock is engaged, a red warning light will flash at you on the door. Some have aural warnings, but not all.

Above someone referred to the "grit bar." It's actually called a "girt bar." Close enough, just a spelling error. On all 737s, MD-80/90 and 717 aircraft, these girt bars are manually engaged by the flight attendant. There is a bar that sticks out from under the slide pack. The bar is placed in two brackets on the door when it is open, but when the door is closed flight attendants manaullay attatch the girt bars to two brackets on the floor. This is probably one of the least favorite things of flight attendants because it involves putting your hands on the dirty galley floor. Ick!
The views expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect my employer’s views.
 
User avatar
jetjack74
Posts: 6585
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 6:35 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 1:45 pm

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
Nope, there's no alarms invovled in these exits.

On some late-model DC10 aircraft, and MD11's, there is evacuation horn at the fwd and aft FA stations, that is activated by the FD crew manually. Not sure if it has an auto-mode.

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 11):
No. Doors are always operated by flight attendants

There are different policies for different airlines. At NW, we the FA's are not allowed to touch the doors, other than to arm/disarm the doors, and in emergency situations. On the ground, the CSA's open and close the doors. When I was at World Air, we operated the doors because of the lack of contracted support at most places we flew to.

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 11):
opened from the outside. Just off the top of my head: BAe 146, 747, 767, 777, L-1011 and all Airbuses.

The 757, DC10/MD11 also.
Made from jets!
 
VHXLR8
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:58 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 1:53 pm

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 9):
On the subject, what's involved in "Arming" or "Disarming" a floor-level exit? I know one part is snaping the orange strap across the window, but beyond that...

As mentioned by other posters, the placing of the orange strap across the viewing window is a sign to ground staff that the door is armed. The actual arming of the door involves the positioning of the girt bar into the floor. This is the procedure on 737s (and others, but i'm not exactly sure which)
Many airlines also 'crack' their doors on 737s (opening them slightly) as a further sign that it is all okay to open the aircraft doors. At QF, this is done when the seatbelt sign is switched off.
On other aircraft, particularly widebodies, opening an armed door from the outside automatically disarms it, hence no need for the orange straps or the carcking of the doors. A simple 'knock knock' and a thumbs up from the F/A is adequate  Smile

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 8):
Not true. The new Embraer 170-190 family have a nitrogen pre-charge that blows open the door when opened in the armed position

Cool, thanks for that info dude!! Did not know that, in fact, know very little about that aircraft, but learning more everyday  Smile

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 11):
This is the "plain" door. To open, pull that silver lever to the "open position" and push the door out. To close, depress the gust lock (on a hinge) and pull the door back in. Then, rotate that silver lever in the opposite way (where it is in the picture).

Well, yes and no. It's actually slightly more involved than. On the 737 doors, you in fact rotate the silver handle; but as you do, you feel the door coming inwards towards you, then at a certain point, you grab the assist handle (as seen on the upper left of the door) and push (and belive me, in the armed mode, you REALLY have to push) the door outwards.
During training, it's not uncommon for F/As to do themselves wrist injuries with these particular doors.

Quoting QQflyboy (Reply 13):
This is probably one of the least favorite things of flight attendants because it involves putting your hands on the dirty galley floor. Ick!

Hahaha, tell me about it.... girt bar 'water', ewwwww!!
 
aa757first
Posts: 3140
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2003 11:40 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 2:22 pm

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 14):

There are different policies for different airlines. At NW, we the FA's are not allowed to touch the doors, other than to arm/disarm the doors, and in emergency situations. On the ground, the CSA's open and close the doors. When I was at World Air, we operated the doors because of the lack of contracted support at most places we flew to.

What I meant by that was that a pilot or a machine will never operate the door. I wasn't very clear on that. I know at American, flight attendants operate narrowbody doors and ground crew operate widebody doors.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 14):

The 757, DC10/MD11 also.

I figured the DC-10 and MD-11 did that, but I didn't think the 757 did that.

AAndrew
 
User avatar
jetjack74
Posts: 6585
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2003 6:35 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 2:32 pm

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 16):
I figured the DC-10 and MD-11 did that, but I didn't think the 757 did that.

Yup, it's stated in my FA manual.

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 16):
What I meant by that was that a pilot or a machine will never operate the door. I wasn't very clear on that. I know at American, flight attendants operate narrowbody doors and ground crew operate widebody doors.

We can't be trusted to open doors at NW. We're taught to fear the doors, so we don't dare touch them.
Made from jets!
 
VHXLR8
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:58 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 3:14 pm

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 16):
What I meant by that was that a pilot or a machine will never operate the door. I wasn't very clear on that. I know at American, flight attendants operate narrowbody doors and ground crew operate widebody doors

At QF, F/As don't open any doors (except in emergencies of course), and we only close the 767 and 'semi-close' the 737 doors.
 
lincoln
Posts: 3133
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:22 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 3:38 pm

Thanks to those who answered my question about arming/disarming doors, it was most enlightening readling the replies... always nice to learn something new.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 17):
We can't be trusted to open doors at NW. We're taught to fear the doors, so we don't dare touch them.

"Oh....my....God....The door...It's coming after me, nooooooo!" (sorry, I just have this image of a flight attendant curled up in a ball in the galley trying to "hide" from the door  Smile). I wonder what drives various airline's policies on the matter, for example, why doesn't Northwest want FAs operating the doors? If (on many models, at least) the FA has to arm/disarm the slide anyways, why not go the extra step of opening or closing?
CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
 
N405MX
Posts: 1156
Joined: Sat May 01, 2004 1:46 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 3:39 pm

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
There is, however, no compressed nitrogen, the doors are foreced open by the power assist mechanism.



Quoting EMBQA (Reply 8):
Not true. The new Embraer 170-190 family have a nitrogen pre-charge that blows open the door when opened in the armed position.

Also the A318/19/20 has the same mechanism, and believe me, it really works.....

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
Nope, there's no alarms invovled in these exits.

On the A319 appears a warning on the ECAM when you unplug the cover of the handle of the overwing exit, also when the slides are armed one page of the ECAM shows it.

Happy New Year.
Life is what happens when you have other plans.....
 
VHXLR8
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:58 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 3:47 pm

Quoting N405MX (Reply 20):
On the A319 appears a warning on the ECAM when you unplug the cover of the handle of the overwing exit, also when the slides are armed one page of the ECAM shows it.

I was referring to the 737s when I made that statement.
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 4:05 pm

On Airbus A319/320/321, there is a white "slide armed" light that illuminates before the door is opened as a warning. On overwing exits, the light (usually next to the window somewhere) illuminates when the hatch handle cover is removed. On emergency doors (light located under the door viewing window next to the red "Cabin Pressurized" light), the light illuminates when the door handle is rotated upwards when it is in the "armed" mode. This light is meant to serve as a warning to cabin crew that the door is indeed armed, and continued action of opening the door will deploy the slide...giving you a second to decide not to open the door or hatch. Inadvertant slide deployment is very very expensive...not to mention dangerous.

On the note of evacuation alarms:
No, aircrafts do not sound evacuation alarms when the emergency doors are opened. It needs to be manually commanded by the flight crew or the cabin crew. On most aircraft (but not all) evacuations can be commanded at each crew station; on others, only the in-charge flight attendant has the command switch at their station. It depends on the make of the aircraft. Cabin crew are responsible for silencing their alarm before proceeding with the evacuation. Having said that, the deployment of slides can be VERY loud, and the pneumatic assist and slide inflation sound is quite recognizable-- upon hearing these loud hisses, the cabin crew may realize that an evacuation has been initiated elsewhere in the cabin, since EVAC alarms have been known to fail...
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 4:14 pm

Quoting EMBQA (Reply 8):
The new Embraer 170-190 family have a nitrogen pre-charge that blows open the door when opened in the armed position.

I have a feeling this makes it sound like the the door is blown off the aircraft; to make it clear, the EMB 170/190 doors do not "explode" off the hinges like you see in the movie "Air Force One". When we say the gas "blows open" the door, it simply means that gas is used to help push the door to the fully open position.

The pneumatic or emergency power assist is sometimes needed because when a door is armed ready for slide inflation, the door becomes much harder to open. For example, if an armed Boeing 747 door has its emergency pneumatic assist fail, it can take up to 210 lbs of force to open the door, whereas normally it is only 22 lbs.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/co...96/scheduleA/section2.htm#section5
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
 
AerospaceFan
Posts: 6990
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 1:43 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 5:23 pm

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 23):
The pneumatic or emergency power assist is sometimes needed because when a door is armed ready for slide inflation, the door becomes much harder to open. For example, if an armed Boeing 747 door has its emergency pneumatic assist fail, it can take up to 210 lbs of force to open the door, whereas normally it is only 22 lbs.

Just an innocent question: Why would the door become harder to open when it's armed?
What's fair is fair.
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 6:05 pm

When the girt bar is engaged into the floor bracket, you now have the slide pack (containing, among other things, the evacuation slide) attached to the floor. The slide pack can be very heavy; subsequently it can take a lot of force to move the door out...especially with particular door designs.

Some of the slides are HUGE (e.g. dual-lane slides) which translates to VERY HEAVY!
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
 
Matt72033
Posts: 1589
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 10:03 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 6:40 pm

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 7):
True, arming a door engages the slide/slideraft and the power assist. There is, however, no compressed nitrogen, the doors are foreced open by the power assist mechanism.

which is powered by compressed nitrogen!
every door ive come accross has nitrogen emergency power assist!
each door has two nitrogen bottles! one for the slide and one for the door!!
 
EMBQA
Posts: 7798
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 3:52 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:12 pm

Quoting N405MX (Reply 20):
Also the A318/19/20 has the same mechanism, and believe me, it really works.....

That's because the same people designed and built the door.
"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
 
andz
Posts: 7627
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 7:49 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:04 am

Quoting Cadet57 (Reply 4):
What does "cross check" mean? I hear it all the time and always wondered what it ment.

SAA will say "physically cross check" which means that the cabin crew on opposite sides of the aircraft must go across and check the opposite arming lever instead of just looking across.

I'm surprised this thread hasn't seen the usual pathetic "oh my God don't discuss how doors work, the terrorists are watching!" yet.
After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
 
eddieho
Posts: 223
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 11:09 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:07 am

During the Air France 358 two of the four slides didn't deploy properly. Actually one of them didnt deploy at all - even with the door opened. What could have caused that?
 
corsairf/a
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2000 12:01 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:30 am

Correction on A330 and A340, in the between the door window, you got a white light flash when trying to open the door while still armed and the red light is cabin pressure light meaning that the aircraft is still pressurized and at Corsair we got to inform the chief purser and who will inform the Captain who will depressurized the plane. The Chief purser got at panel called CIDS (cabin Information display panel) from where he or she can see the state of all doors (red armed, orange disarmed and closed and green disarmed and opened). Though we still do the cross-check and report to the chief purser, to keep the same procedure as the B747 and B737. And only the cabin open and close the aircraft doors. When you start the job, you are really scare of it.
 
Matt72033
Posts: 1589
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 10:03 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 3:21 am

Quoting Eddieho (Reply 29):
During the Air France 358 two of the four slides didn't deploy properly. Actually one of them didnt deploy at all - even with the door opened. What could have caused that?

they may not have been armed!
Girt bar may not have stayed attached!
nitrogen pressure may have been low
quite a few reasons
each carrier has to blow a certain amount every year, just to show that they do work! sometimes when people blow them by accident they count that in there years quota, other times when a slide goes time X they'll blow it instead of just removing it! slides blown in emergencies also count towards this!
 
aa757first
Posts: 3140
Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2003 11:40 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 3:37 am

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 17):

Yup, it's stated in my FA manual.

I wasn't doubting you. I just was surprised. I shouldn't have been, though, since most doors with a handle instead of a manual girt bar do disarm when opened from the outside.

Quoting Jetjack74 (Reply 17):

We can't be trusted to open doors at NW. We're taught to fear the doors, so we don't dare touch them.



Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 18):

At QF, F/As don't open any doors (except in emergencies of course), and we only close the 767 and 'semi-close' the 737 doors.

I never understood this, isn't opening doors normally at least "semi-practice" for opening doors in an emergency?

Just in case any of you were interested, this is information about who opens doors at TWA (or used to, at least):
747: opened and closed by ground crew
L-1011: opened and closed by flight attendants
767: opened and closed by flight attendants
DC-9 and 727: not specified.

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 22):
On Airbus A319/320/321, there is a white "slide armed" light that illuminates before the door is opened as a warning.



Quoting Andz (Reply 28):

I'm surprised this thread hasn't seen the usual pathetic "oh my God don't discuss how doors work, the terrorists are watching!" yet.

Me too.

Quoting Eddieho (Reply 29):
During the Air France 358 two of the four slides didn't deploy properly. Actually one of them didnt deploy at all - even with the door opened. What could have caused that?

Commerical airplane slides frequently, actually.

AAndrew
 
User avatar
antoniemey
Posts: 1229
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:38 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Mon Jan 02, 2006 6:45 am

Quoting Andz (Reply 28):
I'm surprised this thread hasn't seen the usual pathetic "oh my God don't discuss how doors work, the terrorists are watching!" yet.

Yeah, well, if the terrorists want to know how the doors work all they have to do is read the passenger safety cards. Not like it's restricted information or anything.
Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
 
VHXLR8
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:58 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Tue Jan 03, 2006 7:47 pm

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 32):
I never understood this, isn't opening doors normally at least "semi-practice" for opening doors in an emergency?

To be honest, I don't really understand it either. The only reasons that I can really think of would be to prevent injury to F/As during opening or closing doors.
Alternately, perhaps the airlines don't trust F/As not to damage the doors; given that the only training we do on doors involves 'forcefully' opening doors, as opposed to everday operations.
By the way, thanks for the TWA info  Smile
 
tothestars
Posts: 217
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 11:52 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Tue Jan 03, 2006 11:35 pm

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 32):
DC-9 and 727: not specified.

At TWA our flight attendants also opened the doors on the DC-9, MD-80 and 727, and the 757 and the agent closed them. We were trained to open them in an emergency and in routine situations.
TWA-Airline To the Stars
 
debonair
Posts: 2708
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2004 10:50 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 2:07 am

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 15):
As mentioned by other posters, the placing of the orange strap across the viewing window is a sign to ground staff that the door is armed. The actual arming of the door involves the positioning of the girt bar into the floor. This is the procedure on 737s (and others, but i'm not exactly sure which)

ATTENTION!!!Its not true!! Its a customer OPTION. E.g. Lufthansa is flying the B737fleet without strap...  thumbsdown 

But also, this strapis availbale on B757, MD 80, MD 90... Most of a/c have it with slides which are not getting automatically disconnecting if opened from the outside!!

WITHOUT:

MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © Geoncarlos Colon
MyAviation.net photo:
Click here for bigger photo!
Photo © dinosat

 
S5FA170
Posts: 528
Joined: Sun Sep 18, 2005 3:04 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 2:39 am

Quoting VHXLR8 (Reply 34):
Alternately, perhaps the airlines don't trust F/As not to damage the doors; given that the only training we do on doors involves 'forcefully' opening doors, as opposed to everday operations.

On the Embraer 170 I work on, we are taught both how to open and close the door in normal, everday operating procedures (ie - at the gate) and then once that is taught and learned, we learn how to open them in an emergency (basically giving us practice on opening an armed door which will have the Power Assist Function). I'm sure not all airlines teach their crews this, but at my airline, the Flight Attendant always closes the Main Cabin Door. However, the Gate Agent always opens the door from the outside. This removes the possibility of the Flight Attendant accidentally blowing the slide on the main cabin door at the gate, as the door automatically disarms from the outside (as previously mentioned on some other aircraft types!)

Additionally, at my airline - "Crosscheck Complete" does not mean the two F/A's checked the other's doors. It simply means the F/A responsible for those two doors armed (for example) 1L, checked it, armed 1R, checked, then checked 1L and 1R again. Thats a crosscheck at Shuttle America.

-Tony
Prepare doors for departure and cross-check.
 
TUNisia
Posts: 1515
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:24 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 2:53 am

Didn't the L-1011 have doors that slid up into the body of the plane, instead of swinging outside?
Someday the sun will shine down on me in some faraway place - Mahalia Jackson
 
debonair
Posts: 2708
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2004 10:50 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:44 am

Quoting TUNisia (Reply 38):
Didn't the L-1011 have doors that slid up into the body of the plane, instead of swinging outside?

Yeap, like many others! B767, DC-10, L1011...
 
TUNisia
Posts: 1515
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:24 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:51 am

Quoting Debonair (Reply 39):
Yeap, like many others! B767, DC-10, L1011...

Thanks! I was going to say 767 too. I remember seeing those when flying TWA and I always thought it was soo cool. In the TW safety cards the doors going up are clearly dipicted. Why didn't the 777 have this feature? Or was it not considered worthy any longer?
Someday the sun will shine down on me in some faraway place - Mahalia Jackson
 
flyboy80
Posts: 1827
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2001 8:10 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 4:07 am

I have to say all airplane doors are fun to operate, they make cool sounds, some are heavy and unpredictable! And about the terrorists...lol, well...forget about the safety card, I think the big red arrow on all doors pointing towards the word "open" is pretty instructive of how to open the door!
just my .02!
 
A319XFW
Posts: 1519
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 5:41 am

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 4:29 am

I'm sure I've heard stories/read reports on mx crew or f/a getting hit/blown out by doors when they opened them when there was still some residual pressure difference?
The worst I read was that someone opened it during a delta p test and was flung down the stairs and died.

Quoting MarkHKG (Reply 22):
On the note of evacuation alarms:
No, aircrafts do not sound evacuation alarms when the emergency doors are opened.

A sly trick of getting people fast out of the cockpit when working there on the ground is sounding the evac alarm - it's a wee bit louder in the confined space of the cockpit...  angel 

Quoting Antoniemey (Reply 33):
Yeah, well, if the terrorists want to know how the doors work all they have to do is read the passenger safety cards. Not like it's restricted information or anything.

And I'm sure you could probably find out the tricks on how to open the cockpit door when it's locked here on a.net too.....
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 12:19 pm

Quoting A319XFW (Reply 42):
I'm sure I've heard stories/read reports on mx crew or f/a getting hit/blown out by doors when they opened them when there was still some residual pressure difference?

At least 2 people have been killed by Airbus 300 doors because they did not realize the cabin was still pressurized-- in two seperate incidents, no less. The cabin crew did not recognize the symptoms of a "overpressurized" cabin (i.e. the exit handle rotates up, but the door does not open) and there are no warning lights that warned the crew of the situation unlike the Airbus 319/320/321 series which has a red "cabin pressurized" light at each door. Unlike other aircrafts, the A300 doors "do not have built-in systems to relieve pressure before the door is opened."

http://www.ntsb.gov/Recs/letters/2002/A02_20_23.pdf

Quoting TUNisia (Reply 40):
I was going to say 767 too. I remember seeing those when flying TWA and I always thought it was soo cool. In the TW safety cards the doors going up are clearly dipicted. Why didn't the 777 have this feature? Or was it not considered worthy any longer?

One of the possible reasons is that this particular door design is not very forgiving if you should accidentally attempt to open the exit and realize the door is still armed. When you open a B737 door, you will feel the increased weight of the slide pack, so you could have enough time to stop yourself and realize it was armed and thus re-close the door. When you open an Airbus 319/320/321 door, the white "slide armed" light illuminates, and gives you just a second to close the door if you opened it without disarming the door. On the 767/L1101/DC-10/MD-11 type doors, when they are armed, they are spring loaded (or other power assist), so you can't "crack" the door open when you pull the emergency handle when the door is armed. The door will open upwards, and the slide will deploy...very, very fast. It's my understanding that the 767 is notorious for inadvertant slide deployment because of this design, as well as its arm/disarm handle mechanism which can be confusing. (The yellow "slide armed" placard which comes up can be hard to see, and can break off.)
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!
 
AT
Posts: 889
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2000 12:16 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 1:12 pm

This is a fascinating and informative post.

Does anyone have pics/diagrams of the "slide-up" door- the type on the 767 and DC10/L1011, that shows how they operate.
 
lincoln
Posts: 3133
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:22 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 1:28 pm

Quoting Debonair (Reply 39):
DC-10,

Do all doors on the DC-10 slide up or is it just L1? I was in First on a NW DC-10-40 about 5 years ago, and remember watching the L2 door being opened at LAX (including the FA flashing an interesting* "two thumbs up" to the agent on the jetway), and I don't recall it opening up... but now that I think about it, I don't remember it opening in or out either.

Lincoln
* Both thumbs started out horizontal (pointed at each other and parallel to the floor) and then were quickly rotated up, at which point the door was opened [ --> <-- to ^ ^, for those who are more visual]
CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
 
AT
Posts: 889
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2000 12:16 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 1:38 pm

all doors on the Dc10 open upward. THe L1 and R1 doors are smaller then the remaining doors, presumably due to the narrowing of the fuselage up front.
 
Markhkg
Posts: 838
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:13 pm

RE: Emergency Doors On Planes

Wed Jan 04, 2006 9:36 pm

Quoting AT (Reply 44):
Does anyone have pics/diagrams of the "slide-up" door- the type on the 767 and DC10/L1011, that shows how they operate.

Probably the best source is...safety cards! Check out the following website which has the scanned pictures of the cards, so you don't have to go taking cabin safety cards!  Smile

Entire List:
http://www.angelfire.com/pokemon2/aerokimchi/planelist_e.html



Boeing Widebody A/C that have doors that open upwards (B767):
http://10-buck.tripod.com/safelist_boeing_w_e.html
Lockheed Widebody A/C that have doors that open upwards (L1101):
http://hk.geocities.com/aeroinsam/safelist_lockheed_e.html
MD Widebody A/C that have doors that open upwards (DC-10/MD-11):
http://10-buck.tripod.com/safelist_md_e.html
Release your seat-belts and get out! Leave everything!