Alee
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Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2001 3:44 pm

Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 3:03 am

Once a brand new plane (from an existing series) rolls out of the assembly factory, how many hours is it tested in flight? And who delivers it? Boeing ,Airbus whoever or the airline pilots come and pick them up?
 
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Stitch
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 3:17 am

When it's time for delivery, the airline sends a crew to pick it up. When I worked for Boeing, I used to interface with them on occasion in my role.

As to how long the test regimen is, I can't say.
 
474218
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 10:42 am

A new aircraft usually gets between one and three check flights and then a customer acceptance flight, prior to delivery. As stated by Stitch after acceptance the airline provides a flight crew to fly the plane home.
 
AirCop
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 10:49 am

Question regarding taking possession; It appears all of Southwest aircraft come to Sky Harbor first. Frontier used to bring all their new Airbus aircraft here first and then fly them to Colorado, where they would be classified as used aircraft for tax purposes, is it the same for Southwest?
 
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RobK
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 12:07 pm

Quoting AirCop (Reply 3):
Question regarding taking possession; It appears all of Southwest aircraft come to Sky Harbor first. Frontier used to bring all their new Airbus aircraft here first and then fly them to Colorado, where they would be classified as used aircraft for tax purposes, is it the same for Southwest?

Quite a number of Southwest's deliver into Dallas.

R
 
roseflyer
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 12:14 pm

I don't know how airplanes as a whole are tested, but engines are tested up to six (although it could be eight) hours before delivery. All systems have to be functional before those six hours are up (and yes troubleshooting does have to happen on engines). If an engine maker delivers an engine with more time on it than that, it is considered a used engine and the manufacture takes a hit in the sales price. It is often a challenge to get things working. I have never seen how a large 777 engine is built, but for smaller jet engines, they are done in a surprising low tech way. Essentially they are put on a podium that moves up and down and are pieced together individually. They are not made on a fancy moving assembly line as production quantities are not that high (compared to automobiles and other mass produced items for example).
If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
 
SLUAviator
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 12:32 pm

Quoting Stitch (Reply 1):
As to how long the test regimen is, I can't say.

The test regime is as long as it takes to make sure that particular airplane will do everything the book says it will. If we know from the initial flight testing process that a 737 will do X KTAS at FL350 at a particular power setting and a plane from the line will not there is a problem. It has to go through tweaking until it does meet those specs. They check the numbers for all phases of flight. That's why Boeing, Airbus, Cessna, Piper and all aircraft builders employ production test pilots. It makes no sense for someone like WN to accept their 500th 737NG (and that is a number I am totally pulling out of my ass) if it does not perform along the lines of the other 499.
What do I know? I just fly 'em.......
 
3DoorsDown
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RE: Q About New Planes

Thu Feb 02, 2006 1:50 pm

I won't go into any specifics, but for the 737, the planes roll out of the factory and are towed over to Renton Field (RNT) The Renton plant is on the other side of the river from RNT, so it's a short tow. There they do engine runs and prepare the plane for B1 (first Boeing flight. Pilot, Co-pilot on board. no one else). When the functional tests are complete and everything checks, the plane is flown on its B1. This flight usually lasts about 2.5 hours and goes through numerous standard tests. The plane always lands at Boeing Field International (BFI) at the end of B1. At BFI any annomolies and flight squawks are worked out. More engine runs, as required. Then the B2 flight is flown. If there are no more flight squawks or any other issues, the C1 (First customer flight) flight is next. If that has no problems, delivery is next. If it does have issues, B3, B4, C2 and so on can be flown, if necessary, until no problems exist. After all is taken care of, DELIVERY!!! Delivery flights with a very, very, rare few are flown by the airline pilots.

3DD