N60659
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Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 1:25 am

Did not see another thread on this topic. My apologies if it is a duplicate.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...aerospace/2002825298_boeing24.html

It looks like this is another area which shows a fundamental shift in philosophy. I can't help thinking that last year's machinist strike helped steer this decision. I guess the goal is to reduce the impact to the supply-chain if we see another work stoppage like we did last year, especially considering the fact that Boeing is looking to ramp production to 112+ 787's beginning 2008. Just my  twocents .

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Cruiser
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 4:45 am

Quoting N60659 (Thread starter):
It looks like this is another area which shows a fundamental shift in philosophy. I can't help thinking that last year's machinist strike helped steer this decision. I guess the goal is to reduce the impact to the supply-chain if we see another work stoppage like we did last year, especially considering the fact that Boeing is looking to ramp production to 112+ 787's beginning 2008.

If there is a machinist strike like we saw last year, then production would be stopped. Even having the parts suppliers on site and working would not prevent a work stoppage on the actual assembly. This is probably a way for Boeing to become more efficient and crank out even more planes, especially if they eventually go to two production lines.

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flydreamliner
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 4:48 am

Boeing is competing too tightly to miss a beat, they have to make sure the 787 launch is perfect, and that they can supply them quickly and consistantly. If they build 100 of them a year, starting 2008, there could be nearly 300 flying before you see an A350 in anyone's livery. That's a powerful thing.
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DAYflyer
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 4:48 am

An interesting move in a few ways. Hope it works out to speed production and reduce problems.
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 5:22 am

Quoting FlyDreamliner (Reply 2):
If they build 100 of them a year, starting 2008, there could be nearly 300 flying before you see an A350 in anyone's livery. That's a powerful thing.

They will have 112 of them flying by the end of 2009. In 2010 they will be at full production, whilst the A350 will just be ramping up production. The 787 will also have more planes coming off the line at full production compared to the A350.

James
Leahy on Per Seat Costs: "Have you seen the B-2 fly-by at almost US$1bn a copy? It has only 2 seats!"
 
TinkerBelle
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 5:27 am

Quoting FlyDreamliner (Reply 2):
Boeing is competing too tightly to miss a beat, they have to make sure the 787 launch is perfect, and that they can supply them quickly and consistantly. If they build 100 of them a year, starting 2008, there could be nearly 300 flying before you see an A350 in anyone's livery. That's a powerful thing.

It wasn't too powerful of a thing for the A340 as far as the T7 goes since it started flying 2 yrs before thus I think you're oversimplifying it. I know the T7 out-performed the A340 eventually (Don't tell that to LH, SA and VS) but we don't know what will happen to the A350/787 since they're not flying yet. Let's just wait and see.
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whitehatter
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RE: Boeing Goes Outside For 787 Parts Delivery

Sat Feb 25, 2006 5:45 am

Quoting N60659 (Thread starter):
It looks like this is another area which shows a fundamental shift in philosophy. I can't help thinking that last year's machinist strike helped steer this decision. I guess the goal is to reduce the impact to the supply-chain if we see another work stoppage like we did last year, especially considering the fact that Boeing is looking to ramp production to 112+ 787's beginning 2008.

read it again then, you've completely missed the point.

Parts supply means nothing if the assemblers are not putting them together. This is a cost cutting exercise, nothing else. Obviously Boeing doesn't see the need to directly employ people at inflated union rates when a subcontractor can do the job cheaper with a Service Level Agreement to the contractor.

From what I can read into it, the existing jobs which are comparable on the Boeing books are unionised and probably paying rates which would more properly be paid to higher skills employees. A bit like paying cabin crew at flight deck rates because it's an overall rate for anyone in the air.

It's an allegation that has been made against Boeing's structures for years now. Top heavy with people drawing big bucks which are often undeserved. Cutting back on the fat makes them a leaner competitor and cuts down the factory gate price.
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