bhxdtw
Posts: 1035
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 7:28 pm

FAA's Ageing Airplane Program

Thu Apr 20, 2006 8:26 pm

I was watching the National Geographic channel the other day and saw a documentary on the Aloha 737 incident in '88 ..
Amazing how only one life was lost...
It really intreagued me how going at that speed with no side fuselage or roof that the majority of pax were able to remain seated with out getting sucked out...

I just did some research on the FAA website and found the article on the ageing airplane program, I didnt know it had been revised because of the Aloha incident and also the tragic TWA '96 and Swissair '98 Incidents.

heres part of the article..

FAA’s Aging Airplane Program

The FAA’s Aging Airplane Program for transport airplanes includes several regulatory initiatives related to structural fatigue and corrosion as well as aging systems or ‘wiring.’

Three major factors prompted the FAA’s actions:

*Airplanes are being operated beyond original design service goals.
*Original maintenance plans were not required to address potential age-related issues.
*1988 Aloha accident.

Airworthiness Directives
The FAA has issued more than 700 Airworthiness Directives (ADs) to address specific safety concerns or ‘unsafe conditions’ on specific airplane types. Separately, the agency continues to promote far reaching safety measures through general rulemaking that provide a safety net beneath the ADs already mandated.

Of the more than 700 ADs already issued:

*more than 540 ADs were for airplane structural issues since 1990,
*more than 85 ADs were for fuel tank safety issues since 1996, and
*more than 110 ADs were for wiring safety issues since 1998.

were these AD's issued to individual planes or incidents ?

heres the complete article:
http://www.faa.gov/news/news_story.cfm?contentKey=4027

Joe
 
Tod
Posts: 1709
Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 6:51 am

RE: FAA's Ageing Airplane Program

Thu Apr 20, 2006 11:25 pm

Quoting BHXDTW (Thread starter):
were these AD's issued to individual planes or incidents ?

AD's are typically written to apply to whatever group of aircraft the issue is applicable. If the concern is unique to a single airframe, then that would be it, but the ones I see mostly apply to an entire model or groups of models.

Tod

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