N231YE
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Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:10 am

While browsing around the database, I found this aircraft, an MD-90: P4-MDG, was delivered in 1998:


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Photo © Andries Waardenburg



...stored in 2000 (only 2 years of flying), and was scrapped eight years after it was built:


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Photo © Jeffrey S. DeVore



My question is, what other aircraft have lived short lives (excluding crashes), and why? I understand from the photographer's comments this aircraft was supposed to have a new registration and start a new life, but that did not happen.

[Edited 2006-11-29 22:26:51]
 
keego
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:16 am

Quoting N231YE (Thread starter):
...stored in 2000 (only 2 years of flying), and was scrapped eight years later:

So it was scrapped in 2008????
 
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jetjack74
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:17 am

Maybe the RG 777 that's on the chopping block
Made from jets!
 
stirling
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:26 am

Many DC-7s had very short life-spans coming at the dawn of the jet-age.
Most went to secondary carriers or cargo carriers.

Quoting Keego (Reply 1):
So it was scrapped in 2008????

Maybe he meant "Months"?
Delete this User
 
N231YE
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:29 am

Quoting Keego (Reply 1):
So it was scrapped in 2008



Quoting Stirling (Reply 3):
Maybe he meant "Months"?

My mistake, the sentence originally read that it was scrapped eight years after it was built, then I did some editing when I found out its service life and storage date, so the math got a little "out-of-whack." But I fixed the sentence.
 
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N707PA
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:30 am

1958 build 1649 Lockheed Constellations were scrapped in the early 1960's.
 
joemac547
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:31 am

I believe what was said was that the airframe it was scrapped 8 years after it was built (which would be 2006) not 8 years after it was put in storage.
 
spartanmjf
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:50 am

What happened to the DH Comet I aircraft [BOAC etc] that had the structural design fault - the ones grounded after the final Comet I accident?
"Nuts to the man in 21D!"
 
TrijetsRMissed
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:56 am

Quoting N231YE (Thread starter):
I understand from the photographer's comments this aircraft was supposed to have a new registration and start a new life, but that did not happen.

Does anyone know why this aircraft was scrapped? A shortage of parts maybe? Just seems odd that this relatively new and advanced aircraft couldn't find a home with an airline.
There's nothing quite like a trijet.
 
BrettFromCLT
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 7:02 am

I love how they have the wing propped up with a dog house and a railroad tie.
 
A340Spotter
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 7:42 am

As the photographer of the airplane at MZJ, and a former Pro Air employee, I can add some further info to this forum.

All 3 MD-90s, and this has been discussed in a couple of threads previously, were worth more for their parts than the leasing company was going to get for the entire airframe leasing it out. P4-MDF, MDG and MDH all had around 5,000hrs and met their makers during the early parts of the summer '06. When I was there, the blue tailed one (MDH) had already been completely broken up as there was no signs left of it. The green one, MDG, was as the photo showed, down to the tube, while the orange one, MDF, still had the flight deck attached (photos are available on this site but not going to plug it)...

The engines alone were worth more than the leasing company was going to get. In reality, there were only a couple of airlines even interested in these frames (Lion Air and Ghana were rumored)...

JSD
"Irregardless, it's a Cat III airplane, we don't need an alternate!"
 
bond007
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 7:51 am

I think the A380 might be the winner  Wink


Jimbo
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OHLHD
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 7:52 am

My pick is the A330 of MH which was w/o after transporting undeclared dangerous goods and was parted out completly and scrapped.

AFAIK it was only a few months in service.
 
N231YE
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:43 am

Quoting A340Spotter (Reply 10):
The engines alone were worth more than the leasing company was going to get. In reality, there were only a couple of airlines even interested in these frames (Lion Air and Ghana were rumored)...

So I take it that low demand is what 'killed' these birds? Since nobody wanted them, their value to lease was lower than that of their parts (laws of supply and demand), so they were subsequently scrapped...
 
scaledesigns
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 9:52 am

After WWII the Consolidated type 39 Liberator(B24 wings) was only in
service for 3 months with American Airlines.It was scrapped several months
later.
The Republic Rainbow was only around for a few years before being scrapped
after AA dropped the order.

Im sure the list is very long as they used to design and build alot more
airliner types back in the 1940s-1960s.
F1 Tommy
 
LMP737
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 10:05 am

Quoting N231YE (Thread starter):
While browsing around the database, I found this aircraft, an MD-90: P4-MDG, was delivered in 1998

Wow, I saw this MD-90 delivered when I worked at Douglas. Sad to see it scrapped so soon.  Sad
Never take financial advice from co-workers.
 
N231YE
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 10:11 am

Quoting Scaledesigns (Reply 14):
After WWII the Consolidated type 39 Liberator(B24 wings) was only in
service for 3 months with American Airlines.It was scrapped several months
later.

Come to think of it, although WWII military; some of the short-lived B-32 Dominators (arrived in the war too late) were flown directly from the factory to the scrapyard...
 
aeroweanie
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 10:13 am

Martin built an airliner called the 303 in 1946-47. It was a pressurized version of the 202. Customers included United Airlines, Braniff and Panagra. After problems were experienced with the 202 in flight test, the airlines cancelled their orders for the 303 and this led to the program being cancelled. The first two 303s were complete at the time and 87 flight hours had been amassed. To get a $15 million tax carry-back credit, Martin scrapped the aircraft and destroyed all records pertaining to the program. Only two photos are known to survive of the aircraft.
 
concentriq
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 3:18 pm

Quoting OHLHD (Reply 12):
My pick is the A330 of MH which was w/o after transporting undeclared dangerous goods and was parted out completly and scrapped.

anyone has more on this?? sounds interesting!
Mobilis In Mobili
 
keego
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 5:35 pm

Quoting N231YE (Reply 4):
My mistake, the sentence originally read that it was scrapped eight years after it was built, then I did some editing when I found out its service life and storage date, so the math got a little "out-of-whack." But I fixed the sentence

ahh only a bit of light hearted banter stirthepot , I guessed that's what it meant (ie scrapped in 06)
 
flyingnanook
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 5:49 pm

Quoting Concentriq (Reply 18):
Quoting OHLHD (Reply 12):
My pick is the A330 of MH which was w/o after transporting undeclared dangerous goods and was parted out completly and scrapped.

anyone has more on this?? sounds interesting!

I assume that this is the incident he's talking about.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20000315-0
Semper ubi sub ubi.
 
LH648
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:01 pm

Some Tupolev-144 were build but never flown or flown once.

Two 330-200 of Sri Lankan were build in 2000 and burnt on the ground in 2001.
 
GlobalVillage
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:13 pm

Quoting LMP737 (Reply 15):
Wow, I saw this MD-90 delivered when I worked at Douglas. Sad to see it scrapped so soon.

Sad to see Douglas scrapped as well.  Wink
 
SNA350
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 9:05 pm

Quoting Concentriq (Reply 18):
anyone has more on this?? sounds interesting!

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20000315-0&lang=en

it was delivered in '95, so it had 5 years of flying
Aircraft flown: B733, B734, B736, B737, B738, B744, B752, B763, B772, A319, A320, A321, A343, A346, Do328, CRJ7, E190
 
MEA-707
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 9:48 pm

Quoting SNA350 (Reply 23):
anyone has more on this?? sounds interesting!

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20000315-0&lang=en

it was delivered in '95, so it had 5 years of flying

Plus you can consider it a "write-off" even while not in an actual aircrash. There have been more new frames damaged in hangar fires etc. We are looking here for frames which are not damaged but didn't even reach the first D check yet.
nobody has ever died from hard work, but why take the risk?
 
cricket
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 9:58 pm

Quoting MEA-707 (Reply 24):
Plus you can consider it a "write-off" even while not in an actual aircrash.

The compound was a Mercury based compound and Mercury and Aluminium (Aluminum for some) don't mix too well - so it was an incident, which is why it is on the Aviation Safety site and that isn't what the thread starter is asking.
A300B2/B4/6R, A313, A319/320/321, A333, A343, A388, 737-2/3/4/7/8/9, 747-3/4, 772/2E/2L/3, E170/190, F70, CR2/7, 146-3,
 
OHLHD
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 10:53 pm

Quoting FlyingNanook (Reply 20):

Yes it is!  Smile
 
D950
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Thu Nov 30, 2006 11:07 pm

Quoting N231YE (Reply 13):
So I take it that low demand is what killed these birds? Since nobody wanted them, their value to lease was lower than that of their parts (laws of supply and demand), so they were subsequently scrapped...

Possibly, but in this instance the leasing company was charging 2-3x more than some were being leased at. Hello initially had interest, and eventually leased six MD90's and would have loved these low hour birds, but again, between the deals they received from SAS, and Boeing Capital they deemed the offer exorbitant.
Resting on your laurels is a synonym for flirting with disaster
 
D950
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:44 am

But the aircraft itself continues for Aerolineas Argentinas!!
Resting on your laurels is a synonym for flirting with disaster
 
oly720man
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:48 am

The attempt to re-engine the BAe146/RJ only lasted a couple of years


2001

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2003 arriving at MAN on the last flight to go into the air museum on the AVP

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Photo © Airsnaps - WorldAirlineImages

wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
 
UpperDeck79
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:51 am

Quoting D950 (Reply 29):
But the aircraft itself continues for Aerolineas Argentinas!!

Lol, i missread the title as being Shortest life of an airline. Big grin Sorry about that...
AY and ANA rock!
 
irobertson
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:06 am

Good thing this isn't for "any" aircraft, or all the experimental fighters and bombers would take up pages and pages of space.

I'm going to nominate the Avro Canada Jetliner, just for the sake of mentioning it. Taken from: http://www.avroland.ca/al-c102.shtml


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"The first prototype, CF-EJD-X christened the Jetliner, first flew 10 August 1949, just 25 months after the design of the Derwent-engined verstion was started! The crew consitited of Avro UK Chief test pilot Jimmy Orrel; Avro Canada Chief Test Pilot Don Rogers; and flight engineer Bill Baker. The first flight was without any problems and the only problem in over 500 hours of flight occured on the second flight (16 August 1949) when the aircraft had to make an emergency belly-landing because the main gear would not extend (the damage was so minor that the aircraft was flying within three weeks).

By December 1950 the Jetliner had reached 39,800 feet and had exceeded 500 mph in level flight!

Howard Hughes was so impressed with the Jetliner that he wanted to manufacture it under license at Convair and using it on TWA routes, but the U.S. government would not agree to Convair devoting effort and spce to a civil project in view of the Korean crisis.

The Jetliner never did go into comercial use but was used as the aerial survey & photo platform for the CF-100 project, as orders were never placed, construction on the partially built secont prototype was abandoned. On 10 December 1956 the Jetliner was ordered distroyed, and after contacting the National Aviation Museum turned up no interest in obtaining the aircraft due to a lack of space, the Jetliner was cut up on the 13th of December 1956 with only the cockpit section surviving (in the Canadian Aviation Museum in Ottawa)."
 
isuA380B777
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:07 am

Quoting LH648 (Reply 21):
Two 330-200 of Sri Lankan were build in 2000 and burnt on the ground in 2001.

This was a deleberate terrorist attack which lead to burn down of these planes.

Reference: http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20010724-0&lang=en
 
CRJonBeez
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:15 am

Quoting Oly720man (Reply 30):
The attempt to re-engine the BAe146/RJ only lasted a couple of years

good find! is that a garrett tfe 731 strapped to the wings?

thanks for the pictures! it brings back fond memories of air wisconsin for me. if anybody has ever seen the fuel panel of a 146/avro, be sure to watch your hands! it seems when you hit a specific switch on the right side (iirc) that shiney noise maker in the back of the airplane shuts down!  rotfl 
 
trintocan
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:28 am

Back in the 1950s and 60s the faster turnover of airliner designs meant that planes became obsolete much more quickly than they do now. A classic example is the Lockheed Starliner, the last model of the Constellation. Some examples which were built in the early 1960s were scrapped by the late 60s after just 6 or 7 years. The advent of the jet age had made the slower piston powered machines lumbering dinosaurs.

The ex-BA, ex-RG 772 will be gone after less than 11 years in service and while that is sad, it did last longer than these 3 MD90s. Ultimately aircraft are business tools and so sentiment matters little in their respective fates.

TrinToCan.
Hop to it, fly for life!
 
dtwclipper
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:13 am

Quoting Scaledesigns (Reply 14):
The Republic Rainbow was only around for a few years before being scrapped
after AA dropped the order.

Sorry, but the Republic Rainbow never flew as a Civil Aircraft.

"The Rainbow was over 25% faster than the competition. It was to have been the fastest of the post-war airliners until jet powered airliners were brought into service. Eighteen were ordered by Pan Am, and twenty were ordered by other airlines at $1,250,00 apiece......Pan Am and the other airlines cancelled their orders for the airplanes."

http://www.air-and-space.com/Republic%20XF-12.htm
Compare New York Air, the Airline that works for your Business
 
scaledesigns
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:54 am

Thats true,but the airliner version was basically the same without
bomb bays.What a great looking aircraft that was!!

AA was the last airline to drop its order causing the program to be
cancelled...I have a book on the airplane.
F1 Tommy
 
dtwclipper
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 9:57 am

Quoting Scaledesigns (Reply 38):
AA was the last airline to drop its order causing the program to be
cancelled...I have a book on the airplane.

What's the title of the book...I'd be interested in finding a copy.
Compare New York Air, the Airline that works for your Business
 
N231YE
Topic Author
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 12:15 pm

Quoting Dtwclipper (Reply 37):
The Rainbow was over 25% faster than the competition. It was to have been the fastest of the post-war airliners until jet powered airliners were brought into service.

Now that I think about it, I believe the Bristol Brabazon had some of the same fate as shown above with other airliners.

Quote:
The Bristol Type 167 Brabazon was a huge airliner designed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company to fly transatlantic routes from the United Kingdom to the United States. The prototype was delivered in 1949, only to prove a complete commercial failure when airlines felt the plane was too large and expensive to be useful. Despite its huge size, comparable to a Boeing 747, it was designed to carry only 100 passengers (ref. Bristol's brochure), albeit in roomy conditions not generally found on modern aircraft. In the end only one example would be built and that was broken up in 1953 for scrap, along with an uncompleted second fuselage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Brabazon
 
Unicorn
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:56 pm

I believe that there was a quite new A330 (cannot remember the carrier) that suffered a spill of mercury within the cargo hold.

The mercury did so much damage the aircraft had to be scrapped.

Unicorn
 
oly720man
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:37 pm

Quoting Unicorn (Reply 41):
I believe that there was a quite new A330 (cannot remember the carrier) that suffered a spill of mercury within the cargo hold.

The mercury did so much damage the aircraft had to be scrapped.

Malaysian, reply 12.

Quoting CRJonBeez (Reply 35):
garrett tfe 731 strapped to the wings

Honeywell AS977, apparently.

http://www.aerospace-technology.com/projects/avrorjx/

Very sad times when it was cancelled.... the last British Civil transport plane.
wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
 
vv701
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RE: Shortest Life Of An (non-crash) Airliner?

Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:35 am

Quoting Spartanmjf (Reply 7):
What happened to the DH Comet I aircraft [BOAC etc] that had the structural design fault - the ones grounded after the final Comet I accident?

There were eleven DH Comet 1s built:
MSN 6001 G-ALVG ff 27/7/49. Broken up Farnborough 7/53
MSN 6002 G-ALZK ff 27/5/50. Broken up Hatfield 7/57
MSN 6003 G-ALYP ff 9/1/51. Crashed Elba, Italy 10/1/54
MSN 6004 G-ALYR ff 28/7/51. Damaged beyond repair Calcutta, India 25/7/03
MSN 6005 G-ALYS ff 8/9/51. Broken up Farnborough 55
MSN 6006 [DH Comet 2]
MSN 6007 G-ALYU ff 13/12/51. Broken up Stansted 63
MSN 6008 G-ALYV ff 9/4/52. Crashed in extreme turbulence Calcutta 2/5/53
MSN 6009 G-ALYW ff 25/5/52. Broken up 6/55 with fuselage used for Nimrod mock-up
MSN 6010 G-ALYX ff 9/7/52. Broken up Farnborough 6/55
MSN 6011 G-ALYY ff 10/9/52. Crashed in sea north of Stromboli, Italy 8/4/54
MSN 6012 G-ALYZ ff 23/9/52. Crashed Rome, Italy 26/10/52

(There were also 10 DH Comet 1As built.)