mypaks
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 4:40 am

Belly Landing

Thu Mar 15, 2007 8:11 pm

Pakistan news paper www.dawn.com reporting the following:

=======================
Airport closed after plane makes belly landing




By Our Staff Reporter

ISLAMABAD, March 14: Islamabad Airport was closed down after a South African plane coming from Muscat made an emergency landing on Wednesday. The plane was carrying three crew members all of whom remained unhurt. The accident took place at around 7am when the special cargo plane (G-159 type) made a belly landing on runway No 30 after its wheels failed to open.

Ground emergency crew gathered around the aircraft which left black skid marks on the runway. The plane was then tugged away to the PAF base.

When the spokesman for Pakistan Air Force was contacted, he simply said: “It was a non-PAF aircraft”.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) took all necessary measures for the emergency landing after the pilot informed the control tower that the plane’s front landing gear had malfunctioned.

Due to the emergency landing, the airport was closed at 7:03am and cleared at around 8:30am, the spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority, Mubarak Shah, told Dawn.

One PIA flight (PK-366) coming to Islamabad from Karachi was diverted to Lahore, however, no other flight was disturbed, the spokesman said.

==========

Are pilots trained for such emergency?
How does the AC sustain such a landing?
 
oly720man
Posts: 5740
Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 7:13 am

RE: Belly Landing

Thu Mar 15, 2007 9:23 pm

Quoting Mypaks (Thread starter):
Are pilots trained for such emergency?

They'll train for how to prepare for such an eventuality, i.e. what buttons to press, what to turn off (fuel pumps, electrics, presumably). Not something you can train for for real.

Quoting Mypaks (Thread starter):
How does the AC sustain such a landing?

Aircraft are designed with structural hard points in the fuselage, engine nacelles, etc to support the weight of the aicraft if the wheels can't be lowered. Like the Q400 in Japan, the area around the nose undercarriage area would be stronger so it could land safely if the nose wheel failed to lower.

What happens to the props on a Gulfstream 1.... I presume they're set to a particular pitch and the engines turned off to minimise the risk of them failing or causing engine damage because they will hit the runway.
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